Which branch is better for nursing? - page 2

I hear that a certain area of the miltary for nursing is better. I need to know which one is better and why I haven't done thorough research but. I want to do the Nurse Navy Corps. But a friend of... Read More

  1. by   `M3.
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hello,
    From what I understand you would be able to work as an officer in the Army Rerves when you have your Associates of nursing and then when you earn your BSN could transfer, (not sure of the detail on it) to the Active Duty. Either way, you would be an officer and not enlisted.

    Good luck,
    Gen
    oh okay thanks
  2. by   DUECSON
    I've served in both the Navy(active) and Air Force(reserves), believe it or not I liked them both. I do agree the Air Force is going to take care of its people. You can go into the Air Force reserves with an ADN and become an officer. With the Navy Nurse Corps you have to be in your last two years of earning a BSN. 20k sign-on bonus for 3 yr obligation, 25k for 4yr, and/or 30,671 for loan repayment for 5 yr obligation. As far as the AF after completing your BSN then you're able to go active duty. Now let's look at the Army. With your ADN you can become an officer in the reserves. When completing your BSN you can go active. The Army does have more to offer, but they are the first branch to be deployed. Please correct me if i'm wrong about any of this information. I too am talking to a recruiter about the Navy Nurse Corps. and the Air Force.
  3. by   amy0123
    I am also looking into joining the navy/air force as a nurse. The first main reason is because I would like to become more assertive and stand up for myself. Second reason, I have 50k BSN school loans to pay back not including the interest that needs to be paid along with the time it'll take to pay it all off... I do not know if this is for the reserves also, but I was told that living expenses are given monthly. That sounds like my life would be taken care for. :redpinkhe

    I was told that in time, after working for a year or two, that I would be able to become more assertive and also balance my steep debt, especially if I work night shift. Then I would not even need to join the military.

    I'm still deciding and looking into my options... Ofcourse, I would love to have no debt ASAP! And gaining confidence in the nursing field would be priceless.
  4. by   Care&Joy
    Quote from DUECSON
    I've served in both the Navy(active) and Air Force(reserves), believe it or not I liked them both. I do agree the Air Force is going to take care of its people. You can go into the Air Force reserves with an ADN and become an officer. With the Navy Nurse Corps you have to be in your last two years of earning a BSN. 20k sign-on bonus for 3 yr obligation, 25k for 4yr, and/or 30,671 for loan repayment for 5 yr obligation. As far as the AF after completing your BSN then you're able to go active duty. Now let's look at the Army. With your ADN you can become an officer in the reserves. When completing your BSN you can go active. The Army does have more to offer, but they are the first branch to be deployed. Please correct me if i'm wrong about any of this information. I too am talking to a recruiter about the Navy Nurse Corps. and the Air Force.
    Hello there, let me cut & paste a response I gave about the info. I've been aquiring from all the nursing recruiters....

    Army -You have to have a BSN for Active Duty, BUT they will allow you to join the Reserves w/ an ASN/ADN & pay you a monthly stipend to go to BSN school (plus GI bill) while in the Reserves. During this time, though you'd be in Reserves, you are nondeployable in "student status" until you're finished w/ your BSN. After you're done, you can stay in the Reserves or join Active Duty...both w/ a minimum obligation.

    Navy -You can have just your ASN/ADN on entry, but they want you to get your BSN. I had conflicting info here, as one recruiter told me you will be working Full Time while at the same time aquiring your BSN (which takes time), & the other info I got was the same as the Army, in that you will just be focusing on your BSN program the whole time & then will go into working full time after that. They will pay you for your BSN schooling.

    Air Force -You can't join until you have your BSN, period. They will, however, reimburse you for your school loan once you're finished & then you can join the A.F. Be sure to send your application to be processed about 10 months before you plan to join, I was told by the recruiter.

    You must have a GPA above 3.0 for all of these, I believe. Also, you must work your way up from there. I hope this helped!!!

    Also, since you're looking at Navy, here is a doc. my Navy Nursing Recruiter sent me about the ASN-BSN program they have:

    Nurse Candidate Program (NCP)
    Could you use $34,000.00 while attending School?
    Would you be interested in receiving over $170,000
    within 4 years?

    Program Description: Financial incentive program designed for nursing students in their junior year, attending an NLNAC or CCNE accredited BSN program. Must be accepted to an accredited BSN program and be more than 6 months from graduation to apply.

    Physical: In good health and within Navy weight and body fat standards.

    Marital: No restrictions

    Educational Requirements:
    1. Must be enrolled full time or accepted to an NLNAC or CCNE approved Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program.
    2. Must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
    3. BSN must be completed within 24 months if accepted into the program.

    License: Must take the NCLEX-RN prior to reporting to Officer Indoctrination School (OIS)

    There is no drill; you do not even wear a uniform while in the program. Your job and main focus is attending school and graduating with your BSN.

    The Benefits of Joining the Navy Medical Team
    • Opportunities for professional development
    • Career-related training
    • No/low cost medical for you and your family
    • Tax free allowances for food and housing
    • Retirement after 20 years
    • 30 Days of vacation with pay each year
    • Opportunity for world travel
    • Duty assignments at Navy Hospitals and Medical Facilities (acclaimed for developing new procedures and implementing new technology)
    • Military department store (exchange) and grocery store (commissary) privileges
    • Low-cost life insurance options (up to $400,000)
    • Management and Leadership Training

    Obligation:
    • If in the program for 1 to 12 months it is a 4-year Active Duty obligation.
    • If in the program for 12 to 24 months it is a 5-year Active Duty obligation.

    I hope that helps too! It can all be so confusing at times, ha! Also, always verify what the Nursing Recruiters are telling you by talking to other military nurses, etc. Recruiters can mess things up easily . Also, DON'T ENLIST as a nurse!!! It will take you forever to get anywhere in your career advancement & rank if you do. Make sure you go into any active duty as a BSN nurse, as a Commissioned Officer. Good luck! You're way young enough to not be pressured into any decision too fast, ok? :yeahthat:

    Holly

    P.S. I'm probably going Army just so I can get my specialty faster. But, those "creature comforts" of the AF have sure been appealing to me whenever I speak w/ my assigned AF nurse! So, the branch (or civilian side) you choose ultimately depends on where your focus & priorities are going to be in life -whether military, advancement, comfy/fun, family, humanitarian, money, career, etc.
    Last edit by Care&Joy on Oct 11, '06
  5. by   navynurse06
    "Navy -You can have just your ASN/ADN on entry, but they want you to get your BSN. I had conflicting info here, as one recruiter told me you will be working Full Time while at the same time aquiring your BSN (which takes time), & the other info I got was the same as the Army, in that you will just be focusing on your BSN program the whole time & then will go into working full time after that. They will pay you for your BSN schooling."

    Sir, You have to have your BSN upon entry into the nurse corps.
  6. by   windtraveler
    I have my BSN and have been practicing for 6 years, and I am itching for a change. I am 38 is this too "old" for any branch? This is probably a dumb question but is boot camp the same for nurses as for anyone coming into the service? Because I honestly can't see myself going through physical hell (yes I am a sedentary person) . What about overseas opportunities? Does one branch offer more of an opportunity than another?
  7. by   navynurse06
    Windtraveler,
    no you aren't too old. As an officer you do go through what's called OIS. And you do have to pass certain fittness requirements which is based on age and gender. There are lots of overseas opportunities it just depends on what branch you go into. But all branches offer opportunities for OCONUS. Esp with the war going on!
  8. by   windtraveler
    Quote from navynurse06
    Windtraveler,
    no you aren't too old. As an officer you do go through what's called OIS. And you do have to pass certain fittness requirements which is based on age and gender. There are lots of overseas opportunities it just depends on what branch you go into. But all branches offer opportunities for OCONUS. Esp with the war going on!
    Thank you for the response! I don't know why, but I am actually excited about this. I guess I should talk to a recruiter from each branch, but from what I've heard, they dont necessarily tell you the whole truth . Any suggestions? Thanks again.:wink2:
  9. by   navynurse06
    Just make sure you talk to an officer recruiter. If you do join up get everything in writing. Also, its good to speak with nurses from each branch. Good Luck!
  10. by   medicmama
    Hey. I am a ARNG soldier. It depends on what you are looking for. National Guard (both air force and army) allow commission with an ADN degree. Active duty requires a BSN. Regardless, you run a good chance of being deployed no matter what branch you join. I don't know about the other branches, but I know that the Army just isn't getting enough recruits. There are a lot of benefits to military service though. Talk to all of the recruiters and see what works best for you. However, if you have a familly, the Air Force seems to be more family friendly. I am in the process of switching over because of that.
  11. by   Cherish
    Air Force, you may not get promoted as fast as the Army, but they are definately more family orientated.
  12. by   olivedrab
    Quote from windtraveler
    I don't know why, but I am actually excited about this. I guess I should talk to a recruiter from each branch, but from what I've heard, they dont necessarily tell you the whole truth . Any suggestions?
    i share your excitement about serving! i will pass along the piece of advice that changed the whole direction of my research -- only speak to HEALTH CARE (OFFICER) RECRUITERS. anyone else will not have the most up-to-date info about stats, offers, requirements, etc.
  13. by   olivedrab
    Quote from `M3.
    Well I am working on getting my ASN...and along with that I recieve a diploma in Nursing..
    i've been researching things and was struck by this --- i know that an ASN is a 2 year degree and a hospital diploma is a 3 year thing. is that what you are getting? you are working on earning both? :mortarboard:

    Quote from `M3.
    ....I don't want to be deployed..But I really wanted to go to the Navy before but parents wouldn't allow me..And I want to work for the government.
    then i think you really shouldn't sign up at all, but especially during wartime, if you don't want to be deployed! there are other ways to serve the country.

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