Student Considering Air Force Nursing - page 6

Hello Everyone, I am a nursing student trying to decide whether joining the Air Force is the right way for me to begin my nursing career (graduation may 2006). I have found this discussion very... Read More

  1. by   killionj
    I am also considering the Air Force after I graduate - I am willing to deploy I just would like to know more about it. What are the living conditions like, the lifestyle, work load etc. I'm usually good with accepting things I just like to know more about them. Can anyone help me out
  2. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from killionj
    I am also considering the Air Force after I graduate - I am willing to deploy I just would like to know more about it. What are the living conditions like, the lifestyle, work load etc. I'm usually good with accepting things I just like to know more about them. Can anyone help me out
    Deployments in the AF are generally 6 months at a time, but other than that it all depends on what base you deploy to. You could be living in a tent or you could be living in dorms. Work load and lifestyle are just as variable.
  3. by   killionj
    Are nurses who are deployed to the Middle East often directly in harms way? Again, it doesn't really change what I want to do - I just like being informed
  4. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from killionj
    Are nurses who are deployed to the Middle East often directly in harms way? Again, it doesn't really change what I want to do - I just like being informed
    No, generally nurses are not near any direct fighting.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Apr 19, '12
  5. by   midinphx
    During deployments as an AF nurse, we are pretty much kept in the relatively safe area of the hospital, sleeping quarters, dining facility, and gym. There are times when there are mortars and such lobbed into our areas, but the risk of other attack is pretty low. I told my family that I was in greater danger to get in a car accident here in town than get injured in Iraq.
  6. by   Yammar
    Sometimes at night we can hear the boom and then wait for the announcement before donning the IBA. There have been a few that where a bit close to where you could feel the ground shake. One in particular was a little close for comfort, but even with that one I know of only one person who was hurt and they only had a shrapnel frag come through the B-hut. Still all in all I am pretty thankful at the enemies very bad aim.
  7. by   killionj
    Thank you for your response - it helps to be informed about what goes on, what life is like (deployed and on base). I really am eager to be accepted into the NTP and I want to learn as much as I can about EVERYTHING. I want to learn for myself and for my uneasy family/friends...I'm guessing your family midinphx was worried about deployment as well? Have you been deployed before if so how many times/to where?
  8. by   killionj
    Quote from Yammar
    Sometimes at night we can hear the boom and then wait for the announcement before donning the IBA. There have been a few that where a bit close to where you could feel the ground shake. One in particular was a little close for comfort, but even with that one I know of only one person who was hurt and they only had a shrapnel frag come through the B-hut. Still all in all I am pretty thankful at the enemies very bad aim.
    That is also helpful to hear thank you very much
  9. by   midinphx
    I was in Iraq and Afghanistan last summer. It's definitely an experience that you'll never forget. We got mortared a lot. And they actually hit things, amazingly no one got killed from any mortar fire on that base while I was there, despite being hit several times a week. The hospital itself took a rocket one night during the draw down. It hit the lab directly where 2 people were working. They heard the alarms and got down just as we are taught. No injuries! None. A friend of mine hit the ground and under a foot over where he was lying was a 12in hole in the wall. We actually evacuated the hospital that night for structural safety in under 30 minutes. Patients and workers all safe. No one needed so much as a stitch. There is some danger anywhere though, even at the places you go everyday.

    My deployment band comes up again in October this year. As an ICU nurse, we get get tasked each time. I haven't met anyone in the ICU who didn't get tasked when their bucket came up unless he/she had a medical reason. My family didn't really like me being gone. And they really don't want me to go again. But they still support that this is the life I chose. It's not perfect and always great; neither was being a civilian nurse. I missed plenty of holidays and family things then too. Now I'm just gone a bit longer - it goes quick. It's only 6 months.
  10. by   Yammar
    Only six months?? Maybe that sounds like less on the other side but when you are in the middle of it..it sounds like an eternity. It is groundhog day everyday! Everyday! I mean everyday!!
  11. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from Yammar
    Only six months?? Maybe that sounds like less on the other side but when you are in the middle of it..it sounds like an eternity. It is groundhog day everyday! Everyday! I mean everyday!!
    l was kinda of thinking of the same thing. I am tired of the desert and being away from home, and this is as nice of deployment as you can get.
  12. by   killionj
    Quote from wtbcrna
    l was kinda of thinking of the same thing. I am tired of the desert and being away from home, and this is as nice of deployment as you can get.
    Are you deployed currently?
  13. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from killionj
    Are you deployed currently?
    Yep, hanging out in the desert for the last few months.

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