Rank upon entry

  1. Are there any nurses out there who had civilian expereience before going on active duty with the navy or any other branch of service with just a BSN. If so here is my question. what rank where you awared upon coming on active duty and is the formula 6 month for every 1 full year of civilian experience?




    KaineTx
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   navynurse06
    I can tell you that if you have a BSN then you will come into the Navy as an O1/ENS. As far as I know it doesn't, matter how much civilian experience you have. But if you have a MSN you will come in as an O2/LTJG.
    If I am mistaken someone please correct me.
    ENS PM
  4. by   MCHnurse
    Quote from navynurse06
    But if you have a MSN you will come in as an O2/LTJG.
    Actually, it depends on your experience in this case as well. For those like myself who complete a "bridge" MSN program (where you have a BS in something other than nursing but have an MSN), starting out as an Ensign is pretty standard. That's not to say that MSNs with good experience would start at the bottom. Obviously there would be good reason for them to start with higher rank.

    This does not answer the question about the BSN, but I thought I'd just throw my limited knowledge out there.

    Jennifer
  5. by   navynurse06
    If you have your MSN that followed a bsn you will come in as an O2/LTJG. For example, a nurse that I work with came in as a PNP, master prepared nurse who was an rn proir to becoming a PNP. She came in as an O2
    Also, I've heard of a few nurses with several yrs of prior experience that had a BSN, but upon entry into the Navy still became O1/ENS.
    LCDR Dan could shed some more light on this subject!
    ENS PM
  6. by   KAINETX
    Civilian experience does matter and does count towards promotion to LTJG. I am just trying to verify what I have been told by a recruiter. Every branch of the military give credit for civilian experience. Just trying to see how the Navy calculates its time. Not that I dont trust the recruiter, I just belive in Trust , but Verify.
  7. by   DanznRN
    This is one of those areas wher the military meets the civy world. Yes, nurses are given credit for their time as a BSN. My wife was an ADN for 5 years and got nothing when she came in with her BSN. NOw did her BSN miraculously change her nursing experience, no, it's just one of those military things. Also, remember that you have 2-fold job in the military, one as an officer, two as a nurse. Therefore, when you get bumped up in rank for your nursing experience, you will be expected to show the same experience as an officer in the Navy, hard to do when you just came in. So it is not always a good thing to get those years, although it looks much better on payday. As far as I know there is no formula for figuring out what counts for what. Yes, I have heard the 1 year nursing = 6 months military, but don't bank on it. I would negotiate with the recruiter for the best deal. Just remember, if you come in as a LTjg and people see you with your silver bar on, people will expect you to conduct yourself as if you have been in for 2 years already. In the end people will expect more out of you based on your rank, easy when it comes to nursing, harder when it comes to miltary.

    LCDR Dan
  8. by   KAINETX
    From what i was told there is a DoD regulation that governs how the civilian time is calculated and all branches use this method. i know right now i have around 18-19 months total and was told i would get 9 months and some days towards LTjg at that point and i was pushing for more, but was informed nothing more can be done is a DoD policy. From what LCDR DAN has written coming in with about 15 time to prepare for LTjg would be a good thing. Thanks for all of your responses they are greatly appreciated.


    Thanks,



    KaineTX
  9. by   Gennaver
    Quote from navynurse06
    If you have your MSN that followed a bsn you will come in as an O2/LTJG. For example, a nurse that I work with came in as a PNP, master prepared nurse who was an rn proir to becoming a PNP. She came in as an O2
    Also, I've heard of a few nurses with several yrs of prior experience that had a BSN, but upon entry into the Navy still became O1/ENS.
    LCDR Dan could shed some more light on this subject!
    ENS PM
    Hi,
    I can only speak about one specific thing that I know but, I agree with you. Someone I know has her MSN, FNP and over 13 years of experience and went in as a Captain, (Army).

    When I graduate as a new nurse I will have my MSN but, it will be an entry degree and I will be a new nurse so I go in as a 2LT, (as do all new nurses). So I do believe experience is a factor in rank as well as education.

    Gen
  10. by   IraBeaOasis
    Hey, KAINETX,
    My experiance on gettin' a commission in October into the ANC as a reservist was as a 1st Lt. O-2, with 18 months time in grade towards Capt., O-3. That's with 13 years experience as Rn with a critical care certification. What my recruiter told me was that the medical board that selects applicants for commisions into the health care field uses no set standard for specifying rank awarded to direct commissions other than O-1, brownbar, for entry level ( graduate ) RNs. On any given day the board uses prior experience, prior service, specialty / education level, and Army needs to arrive at a decision for rank.
    Hope that helps a little, good luck in the Navy.

    Regards,
    Eric
    Last edit by IraBeaOasis on Nov 14, '06 : Reason: spelling
  11. by   traumaRUs
    It is always, always what the needs of the military are at the time of joining!

    I was seriously interested in going back to active duty and I was offered 0-4. I have 2.5 years enlisted, an MSN, licensed APN, 16 years experience as a nurse. What they liked was the 10 years in a level one trauma center.
  12. by   teiladay
    Quote from KAINETX
    Are there any nurses out there who had civilian expereience before going on active duty with the navy or any other branch of service with just a BSN. If so here is my question. what rank where you awared upon coming on active duty and is the formula 6 month for every 1 full year of civilian experience?




    KaineTx
    Yes. You are on target with the .5 years of credit per every year of experience that you have.

    Remember.. never go by what a recruiter tells you unless he/she can show it to you in an official publication.

    My mantra for those in the military or thinking about joining is, "If you don't see it in writing, then it isn't so... If you don't see it in your contract, then it won't happen." Now obviously there are exceptions, but I tell you with all sincerity, that you won't ever go wrong with those words in your pocket I coined it for myself nearly 15 years ago and I still approach everything important in that manner.

    ** The publication that covers "Constructive Credit" , etc., etc.. is VERY comprehensive and covers pretty much every question a person would have as related to how much credit the military MUST give for various education levels and or work experience.

    REFERENCE: Department of Defence (DoD) Instruction Number 6000.13
    Dated: June 30, 1997

    See para: 6.1.2.2.5

    This covers all branches of the military.

    The military also gives day-day constructive credit as well for certain situations. Be sure to read very, very, carefully as this (like most if not all DoD instructions) are very, very specific and to the point, leaving little room for interpretation.

    Remember.. education usually trumps work experience when it comes to your initial rank/pay grade (check the reference)

    Good Luck to everyone!
  13. by   Gennaver
    Quote from teiladay

    Remember.. education usually trumps work experience when it comes to your initial rank/pay grade (check the reference)

    Good Luck to everyone!
    Hello Teiladay,

    I am glad that you listed "usually" and not "does".

    Currently my application is before the third review board. The first time it was rejected in one day due to my having applied as a student nurse candidate. I was told that they only accept BSN students as student nurse candidates and not MSN entry students.

    Repackaged for regular Army and got a call a week later requesting my cna state registry information from 1989, (It was before my state requested a state test and I am listed as not having taken the test-oh I recently requested to take it and was denied by the state who claimed I was excempt from it due to it being added after my certification).

    Anyway, after I sent the cna certificate info I got an unofficial "welcome" from the person who packaged my information, she said that the next time she called me would be to schedule when I wanted to take my oath.

    Three weeks later I get a call that the board passed over my application with no reason.

    I wanted to repackage it, update it since I've completed another quarter at school and some of my statements where still outdated due to being for the nurse candidate package.

    Recruiter and package organizer said, no, just leave it as it is so it can go right before the board.

    Well, I am rambling because this is stressful. I do not know why it was passed over since they didn't say.

    I made it clear in my statement that even though I will have an MSN upon graduation that I will still be a new clinical nurse in need of preceptorship.

    Sigh, so, I am waiting.
    Hoping to become a 2LT,
    Gen
  14. by   SRNA-Halothane
    When I joined the Navy I had three years ICU experience with one & half of those years as a traveling ICU nurse. I was only a ENS/O-1 for 6 months until I put on LTjg. I believe it is actually better for someone to come in as a ENS or a LTJG instead of a LT or LCMDR. Because unless you are prior enlisted getting used to how military promotions work and how to make yourself look good on Fit-reps you don't want to be passed for promotion at such a low rank. Passed two times and you are mostly be discharged. Keep in mind that promotion from ENS to LTjg to LT is automatic. They want you to learn how to be a nurse and how the military works and not stress about making rank as a young junior officer.

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