Questions for new Navy nurses - page 3

Hello all, I've been lurking here for some time and I've noticed a recent upsurge in Navy topics. With that, I thought I might jump in and get some questions answered. First, a little about... Read More

  1. by   DanznRN
    Sorry, just got around to getting here today, not ignoring. Anyway, I agree with what ENS PM has said. As far as CEUs, check with your individual state because my state doesn't require me to submit CEUs for my license because I'm military. I got audited about 4 years ago and when they found out I was Navy, they marked my record and filed it, no more audits. I do want you to keep in mind some things though. ENS PM works at one of the biggest hospitals, no, the biggest on the West Coast. Therefore, they may or may not be, more staff to help staff the unit so she can attend her classes. However, she is new and needs to get it done. I was stationed in Sicily where some classes were held once every so often, so from time to time you did have to go to class after a night shift or go to class plus your shifts. With things like this it will vary from place to place. The bad thing is, no overtime. DivOs will try to keep track of whenyou go above and beyond, but when you work in a unit that has 5 nurses to cover 4 shifts like I did, it doesn't always happen. Just keep it in mind. I don't tellthings like this to discourage, my goal is make sure you are as informed as possible. My opinion is that if you are informed from the get go, you are less likely to leave down the road, I like keeping nurses in the Navy. Let me know if I can be more help.

    LCDR Dan

    P.S.- Happy veterans day y'all
  2. by   navynurse06
    Happy Veteran's Day to you, too!
  3. by   DanznRN
    You West Coasters and your being 3 hours behind us, it's almost past my bedtime. Have a good evening.

    LCDR Dan
  4. by   MCHnurse
    Quote from DanznRN
    I agree, most units do 12s with a 3-on, 2-off, 2-on, 3-off weekly rotation. nice thing is you get about 2 weekends off a month.
    Okay, you are going to have to pardon my stupid question here. I was looking at a calendar trying to figure this out, and if what I'm doing is correct, then there are weeks that you might work 5 12s but then the next week you might work 2 12s. Does that sound right?

    I obviously have too much time on my hands now that school is out for the break. If I don't hear from my recruiter soon I may explode.
  5. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from MCHnurse
    Okay, you are going to have to pardon my stupid question here. I was looking at a calendar trying to figure this out, and if what I'm doing is correct, then there are weeks that you might work 5 12s but then the next week you might work 2 12s. Does that sound right?

    I obviously have too much time on my hands now that school is out for the break. If I don't hear from my recruiter soon I may explode.

    That is the typical rotation for 12hr shift workers in nursing. It doesn't matter if it is civilian or military. You end up working 84hrs every two weeks, but don't forget that in the military you also have extra duties to do on your "days off".


    Capt E, USAF,NC
  6. by   DanznRN
    Here is what a typical week looks like, I'm a visual guy. The Ds stand for days and Es are days off. The military loks at its schedule as Sunday to Saturday. Following that miltary logic, you work 3 shifts (36 hours) one week and 4 (48 hours) the next.

    D D E E D D D E E D D E E E

    M T W TH F SA SU M T W TH F SA SU

    It does look wierd, but once you do it, it makes some sense.

    LCDR Dan
  7. by   MCHnurse
    Quote from DanznRN
    Here is what a typical week looks like, I'm a visual guy. The Ds stand for days and Es are days off. The military loks at its schedule as Sunday to Saturday. Following that miltary logic, you work 3 shifts (36 hours) one week and 4 (48 hours) the next.

    Visuals are something I can relate to. Wery well explained. Now I got it! Thanks.

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