Physical Fitness!!

  1. I just found out that I passed my boards!! I'm all set to head out for OBC on 09 April, and then to Tripler for my first assignment as an Army nurse! First, I need to get into shape. Any tips or suggestions for how to get in shape for OBC? I consider myself pretty healthy. I eat right, workout and/or jog occasionally, but I don't feel at all prepared to take on OBC or the PT test yet.
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  2. 23 Comments

  3. by   Cherish
    Work on sit ups and CORRECT push ups. You need to pass the 2 mile run in a certain time for your agegroup. Work on sprints, trust me it helps. Try running on a track and figure out the two miles, sprint on the corners. Do jumping jacks and more calesthenics since thats what they usually do in Army. I just got out in Sept.
  4. by   mckenzie4891
    When it comes to sit-ups and push-ups, do you think it's best to focus on those two exercises, or would I be better off augmenting them with some weight training? If so, what should I be working on?
  5. by   Rme4life
    I would stick with focusing on the pt test: pushups, situps and the 2 mile run. I will soon be in your shoes, I am slotted for obc in august. For a start I would find out what your requirements are (you at least need a 60% in each grp for your age to pass). The only way to get better at pushups is to do pushups. Just do as many as you can and then try to add to it. Most women are lucky that even if they don't really do situps, this is something that will be easy to improve on. Has something to do with our center of gravity or so I have read. For the run, depends on what you need help with. It can be just as embarrassing to fall out of a formation run because of the distance as it can be to do poorly on a pt test. You should be able to pass the 2 mile run in your time and if you can't then work on speed (as posted early by someone else, sprinting helps). If you don't have a problem with speed but have a hard time running longer than 2 miles, then work on distance. You only need to run about a 10 min. mile for the distance thing and usually around 4 or 5 miles is about the norm. Maybe a faster pace for the first mile or so, but they usually slow down because they want you to stay in the formation and not drop out. My opinion on doing anything else, sure if you need variety, otherwise stick to passing the pt test. you don't need to lift weights to iimprove your pushups, situps or run. you will always have time for this after you know you can pass and/or get the score you want.

    So I have heard many different stories about obc and the pt test. They give you one within the first week. The obc web site makes it sound like if you don't pass you are out. Not really clear if that means out of your class and they just keep you around doing pt until you can pass or what. Everyone else (older officers and recruiters) I have talked to makes it sound like as long as you can pass before graduation you are ok and that the first one is not that important, so if you fail you still keep going on in the class. So does anyone know the real deal????

    by the way CONGRATS!!!
  6. by   Gennaver
    Quote from mckenzie4891
    I just found out that I passed my boards!! I'm all set to head out for OBC on 09 April, and then to Tripler for my first assignment as an Army nurse! First, I need to get into shape. Any tips or suggestions for how to get in shape for OBC? I consider myself pretty healthy. I eat right, workout and/or jog occasionally, but I don't feel at all prepared to take on OBC or the PT test yet.

    Congratulations!!!

    How soon did you know where you were going in relations to passing your boards? Did you know ahead of time?

    I am so curious because I won't sit for NCLEX until July/August and am so curious as to when I find out where my base assignment will be.

    Meanwhile you may want to check out military women dot come to read their advice in the columns about pt.

    I have heard that to train for the pushups and situps that those are the best exercises to do for them.

    For the run, I would say to work only on a base distance now you have until April and you do not want to injur yourself with any speedwork now!

    I have been a runner off an on for over 20 years, (three marathons not racing but, some smaller races and cross country).

    Build a base gradually with not more than 10% increase in distance a week and occasionally take a break, (a couple days).

    You do not want to show up to OBC with shin splints and injuries right? Okay, when you have about six weeks or so of base build up add in some short intervals, (sections of your run where you go at a higher tempo for a minute to three minutes or even from 100 meteres to 400 meters). You ought to do much better than you think you could for the run! Before you know it you can make your interval tempo for an entire mile, then two, (for the pt run!)

    Good luck and keep us updated, okay?
    Gen
  7. by   Cherish
    For pushups I worked on it in basic by at night they had a mirror that was perfect level with your shoulders when you were in the down position. Try to put a cheap mirror up that if your in the down position your shoulders will be flat, and your butt down but not bent down but perfectly aligned. Go to the gym and look at the mirrors your body needs to be one straight fluid movements. Do over 22, thats usually the minimum. Then work on 25 super straight while looking in the mirror. You need to keep your head aligned with spine do no look at ground. You will perfect your sit up this way no close hands or far when taking pt test. You can bend up or down to relax but no knees or ground or lifting up your hand. Or you will be disqualified. You can move hands or feet by SLIDING them. Your situp, you must interlock or at least touch fingers behind head. If you unlock them you can be disqualified they only count when you go back down and lower back hits ground, not in up position. So if your on your last one immediately hit back to the ground, don't finish it upright.

    I have had the PT patch since 02. I always get the maximum so trust me this works. You can work on you situps by actually working your hip flexors too since situps do not work your abs. Try doing hip raises or look online for exercises that work this, or go to your local gym. Push ups can be worked on by doing push ups but military presses can help too. If you want to work on close hand then work out your pectorals. They will do this during PT time, which is usually more than 3-4 times a week. You do not want to be in remedial PT. Plus as an officer if you fail it looks REALLY bad to your soldiers.

    Oh yea if you are over the weight requirement for your sex and age you WILL be taped. You can get flagged (it means that you can not get special treatment like go to school, have personal leave, basically some freedoms will be withdrawn) for failing PT test and/or weight. When you are taped because your over there maximum if your BF% is over theres you will be flagged. Even if your MUSCULAR I have seen people who weight train fail because its a TAPE measure not calipers. They could have technically 5% body fat but the tape says they have 24%. I know the Army is really oldschool with the weight requirements and tape measure. At gyms they don't even use that anymore, calipers are more accurate then tape but its still is not that accurate.

    So if your over 10-15lbs of your max weight, try to lose weight or tone up so your muscle isn't bulky but more lengthy. You can call the recruiter or search online for weight requirements.

    If you pass your PT test but fail weight you are flagged and put on the Army Weight Control Program. If you fail your PT test but pass weight you are still flagged. So it is best to PASS both.

    If you want the PT Patch like I had just max or get over 290 on the PT test. I never wore the Patch only had it sewn on one uniform, but you can sew it on your PT's. Also, there are running groups in formation A-D, I was in A or B depend on how I felt that morning LOL. But A is the fastest about 6-7 min mile. B was about 7-7.45. C was about 8-9 and D was usually 9. Could be faster...on C or D don't know cause never ran with them.

    http://www.hooah4health.com/4You/apft.htm

    P.S. DO not train on treadmile...Army DOES not run on a treadmile find a track. Army runs on concrete, but a track is better on your feet and knees. You need the experience of running outdoors. Even if its cold outside run...Army saying...if it ain't raining we ain't training...

    You will run in cold, or rain.

    Most of the time PT Test is in the rain...I have no idea why LOL.

    Try in the morning or late afternoon...PT starts at 0615-0630 in the Army so if you want to get used to Regular Army try running at those times.
    Last edit by Cherish on Jan 11, '07
  8. by   mckenzie4891
    wow! thanks for all the great tips! I'll definitely put it into practice, especially the info on the HOOAH website!
  9. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Cherish
    For pushups I worked on it in basic by at night they had a mirror that was perfect level with your shoulders when you were in the down position. Try to put a cheap mirror up that if your in the down position your shoulders will be flat, and your butt down but not bent down but perfectly aligned. Go to the gym and look at the mirrors your body needs to be one straight fluid movements. Do over 22, thats usually the minimum. Then work on 25 super straight while looking in the mirror. You need to keep your head aligned with spine do no look at ground. You will perfect your sit up this way no close hands or far when taking pt test. You can bend up or down to relax but no knees or ground or lifting up your hand. Or you will be disqualified. You can move hands or feet by SLIDING them. Your situp, you must interlock or at least touch fingers behind head. If you unlock them you can be disqualified they only count when you go back down and lower back hits ground, not in up position. So if your on your last one immediately hit back to the ground, don't finish it upright. ...
    Hello,

    I am GLAD to read you.

    I have also been working on my pushups and sit ups and have questions.

    How far down do we need to go for our pushups? I do not think I am going down far enough, (only until a 45degree angle of my arms, that can't be enough!).

    Also, I am really not sure if my sit ups are good...will we have anyone holding our feet down or do we need to figure out how to keep them down on our own? If so, then I am definately in need of work!

    Thank you for your advice,
    Gen
  10. by   Rme4life
    you should look up fm 21-20. this is the field manual for the army physical fitness program. chapter 14 has the standards for the pt test and if you click on the figure link you can see pictures of what a correct pushup and situp looks like.

    for pushups you can have hands shoulder width apart or wider, your feet can be together or up to 12 inches apart and you need to keep your body in a straight line while lowering to where your upper arms are parallel to the ground.

    for situps, feet can be together or up to 12 inches apart and someone holds your feet. you start in the down position with your hands laced behind head (at least fingertips laced) and hands touching the ground. legs have to remain in a 45 degree angle and the base of the neck has to be above the base of your spine to count. 1 rep is from the down position - all the way up -and back down until the bottom portion of your shoulder blades touch the ground. you do not have to have your hands touch the ground again to count as a rep.

    i hope this helps but reading the fm will further clarify any questions.
  11. by   RN BSN 2009
    Good luck!
  12. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Rme4life
    you should look up fm 21-20. this is the field manual for the army physical fitness program. chapter 14 has the standards for the pt test and if you click on the figure link you can see pictures of what a correct pushup and situp looks like.

    for pushups you can have hands shoulder width apart or wider, your feet can be together or up to 12 inches apart and you need to keep your body in a straight line while lowering to where your upper arms are parallel to the ground.

    for situps, feet can be together or up to 12 inches apart and someone holds your feet. you start in the down position with your hands laced behind head (at least fingertips laced) and hands touching the ground. legs have to remain in a 45 degree angle and the base of the neck has to be above the base of your spine to count. 1 rep is from the down position - all the way up -and back down until the bottom portion of your shoulder blades touch the ground. you do not have to have your hands touch the ground again to count as a rep.

    i hope this helps but reading the fm will further clarify any questions.
    Hi,
    Thank you!
    Gen
  13. by   armyvet
    What are the runs like at OBC as far as distance and pace are concerned. Do you do 5mi everyday or more like 3-4mi? Also what is the pace?Faster than 9 min miles?
  14. by   Rme4life
    i would also love to hear the answer to this question. i am not a great runner and would love to find out what i am in for.

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