Navy Nurses Corps- Nursing Student

  1. 0
    Hello all,
    I'm still in nursing school, graduate in December of 2013 with my BSN and am seriously (have been for a while) considering the Navy Nurses corps after graduation. I've spoken to a recruiter two years ago who was more interested in me applying to the Nurses Candidates Program. I opted out because at the time I was playing D1 water polo and couldn't take the additional stress. I'm done with polo now though, focusing on school and still playing around with the idea of applying for NCP my last year... however my questions are assuming I don't apply for NCP and go to join after graduation.

    -What exactly do they look at when determining if they'll accept you or not? (GPA, experience?)
    - is there a minimum graduating GPA required to be accepted? (all I've found was that they want you to be a US citizen, graduate from an accredited program and pass your boards.. but i feel like there's more to it then just that)
    - Should you apply before or after you take the NCLEX?
    - Will they accept new grads straight out of school?
    - do you get to choose your specialty or do they throw you where they need you?
    - if you get denied, can you reapply or is it a one time deal?

    My dad was in the navy, but doesn't know enough to definitively tell me about the med corps, Recruiters aren't always clear, I've asked the Nursing alumni association at my school if there was a navy nurse or any military nurse I could talk to (none apparently), and i'm from Arizona (not a lot of navy anything there) so I've never come across any to speak with. I see all the military posts and know that there are navy nurses who go on these forums.
    Thank you for taking the time to read this! ANY information/replies/advice etc. would be greatly appreciated!
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 17 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Check out some of the many similar questions on my thread titled: military nursing questions answered. Hope it helps.
  5. 4
    -What exactly do they look at when determining if they'll accept you or not? (GPA, experience?)

    There is a whole process of application, interviews, references, etc, Get started first by contacting the healthcare recruiter.
    - is there a minimum graduating GPA required to be accepted? (all I've found was that they want you to be a US citizen, graduate from an accredited program and pass your boards.. but i feel like there's more to it then just that)
    I believe that the minimum recommended GPA was 3.0. Of course, the better your qualifications, the more competitive you will be for selection.
    - Should you apply before or after you take the NCLEX?
    You can apply for the Nurse Candidate Program (NCP) upon being accepted to an accredited CCNE or NLNAC nursing school and any time during nursing school. You will incur an additional year of obligated service in the Navy for each year or part thereof that you are in NCP.
    - Will they accept new grads straight out of school? Yes, as direction accession, but then you are completing for a space against other experienced nurses as well as new grads. If accepted into NCP you basically have a slot reserved for you upon successfully graduation and NCLEX completion.
    - do you get to choose your specialty or do they throw you where they need you? You are able to voice your preferences and those will be taken into consideration, but the overwhelming drive will be the needs of the Navy.
    - if you get denied, can you reapply or is it a one time deal? Be positive, don't need a second chance.

    I went through NCP and graduated nursing school in May 2011. I have been working at a Naval Medical Center since August.



    hardline,

    ENS, NC, USN
    Sw88tpea, jcgrund, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  6. 0
    Thank you both for the resources and answers, definitely helps talking to someone who's gone through it!! I'll be talking to the recruiter when I get home
  7. 0
    So with what you were asking there are minimums, but with budget cuts and the nursing shortage finally being found out to be a myth, here is what you need to know.

    If you are not in the nurse candidate program, the Navy will not take you right out of school. I have seen several applications, including my own, not be taken. You especially should not apply if you don't even have your license yet. You're just asking to get rejected if you do that. In case you're wondering what my GPA was when i applied and got rejected, it was a 3.6.
    If you definitely without a doubt want to get in without being rejected, apply as a critical care nurse. What are the requirements for that? You have to have 4 months of ICU experience as a nurse. Now even though you will definitely get in the navy through that process, there is no guarantee you will be put into critical care. I ha 1.5 years of experience, CCRN, and TNCC and I almost got put into a med/surg unit. That was mostly because I'm stationed at Walter Reed, but it can happen to you too.
    If you get denied, it is not a one-time deal. You can apply as many times as you want to, but I just personally don't like rejection. Do critical care and you'll get in, seriously.
  8. 0
    Purple demon, please be more objective in your responses and less cocky. We really get tired of the self appreciation.
    Or better yet, don't post at all.
  9. 1
    Speechless
    oaktown2 likes this.
  10. 1
    I'm not sure what's going on between the two of you (and it seems Purple_Demon_RN doesn't know either?), but if you have an issue with someone, this is not the place for it. Address the post, not the poster. Fair warning. Also, the forum has an "ignore" feature. I encourage you both to check it out. Thanks.
    tnbutterfly likes this.
  11. 0
    Hi LunahRN,

    Hope all is well with you. I was wondering I see you have your CEN, can you tell me how difficult you thought that was? How long had you been in ER, etc? I see you are also a paramedic so i'm sure you have tons of experience. Obviously you are pretty smart as well
    So the test could have been a breeze for you. I have been a nurse for almost 15 years however, was an EMT and worked in the ER as a nurse for 4 years but it wasnt trauma. Any insight would be helpful. Thanks so much.
  12. 0
    I thought the CEN was pretty easy, but I studied for it -- used the Med-Ed audio lectures. I had 10 months of ER RN time, 4 years of total ER time, and 6 years of paramedic experience when I took it. I have spent the majority of my ER time in community hospital sized ERs, only a couple of months per diem in a trauma center before the Army took me away from Virginia.


Top