Navy Nurses Corps- Nursing Student - page 2

by zonzabug

7,864 Views | 17 Comments

Hello all, I'm still in nursing school, graduate in December of 2013 with my BSN and am seriously (have been for a while) considering the Navy Nurses corps after graduation. I've spoken to a recruiter two years ago who was... Read More


  1. 0
    Thanks LunahRN for such a timely response. I have a manual that was given to me by a friend. It also has CD's although not sure which ones. Yes, you did have alot of experience. That's ironic I'm in VA too!!!!! Can you say where you are in the Army? Or perhaps PM me. May i ask also why you chose the Army? You can PM me on that too if you need too. I would love to hear more about your experience and your reasonings. Thanks again, you are a kind one!!
  2. 0
    I'm stationed in Georgia now. I chose the Army because I had too many tattoos for any other branch of service, but I'm glad I ended up with the Army, all things considered -- I think I would have chosen it regardless. There is a link to my Army Nursing blog in my signature: Army Nursing - Nursing Community for Nurses
  3. 0
    Hey,

    oh ok gotcha. I will go to your blog. Thanks! Go Green
  4. 1
    This is an email from my email box from a nursing officer hope this helps ...



    Thank you for your interest in the Nurse Candidate Program (NCP)! The Nurse
    Candidate Program is designed for full time students at a brick and mortar
    school (on-line curriculums do not qualify) within 24 months of completing
    their BSN degree. It offers a $10,000 entry bonus that is paid in two
    $5,000 installments, one at the start of the program and the second 6 months
    later. In addition, you receive $1,000 per month given as $500 twice per
    month. There are no other financial incentives for this program. It does
    not cover tuition, fees, books or equipment. The maximum participation in
    the program is 24 months. While in the program, you are officially in an
    Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) status. You do not drill, and cannot be
    deployed. For up to 12 months of benefit, you are obligated to the Navy to
    serve 4 years on active duty and 4 in the Individual Ready Reserve. For 13
    – 24 months of benefit, you are obligated to the Navy to serve 5 years on
    active duty and 3 years in the IRR. Once you graduate and pass your NCLEX
    examination, you are commissioned and attend Officer Development School in
    Newport, Rhode Island for 5 weeks and from there you move on to your first
    duty station. New nurses are often assigned to one of our medical centers
    in Bethesda, MD; Portsmouth, VA; or San Diego, CA, but you could also be
    assigned to one of our larger community hospitals. You work with an
    assignments officer, which the Navy calls a "Detailer," to obtain your
    assignment once on active duty. We do not often send new nurses to our
    overseas hospitals.

    To be eligible for the NCP, you must be a US citizen, be at least 18 years
    old and able to complete 20 years of commissioned service before the age of
    62 (so you must graduate from your BSN degree program and be on active duty
    by the age of 42), be enrolled or accepted into a full time ( not on-line)
    accredited (by NLNAC or CCNE accrediting bodies) BSN program, be within 24
    months of completing your BSN, have a GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale,
    be a full time student in 2 semesters or three quarters a year, and must
    pass the physical requirements (female standards available at:
    http://www.navy-prt.com/femalestanda...tandard.html); male standards:
    http://www.navy-prt.com/malestandard/malestandard.html). Here is the site
    for NLNAC accreditation: http://www.nlnac.org/Forms/directory_search.htm .
    Here is the site for CCNE:
    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/CCNE/report...w.asp?sort=sta
    te .

    Here is the information on our Website regarding the Nurse Candidate
    Program:
    http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/navmed...eCandidateProg
    ram_Prospective.aspx
    CSUnursegirl2b likes this.
  5. 0
    Just wanted to clarify what my recruiter told me, trauma and critical care are not needed in the Navy right now. He told me to stick with med-surge. Psych is good as well, however; you must have experience and they are not taking as many psych nurses. Not sure if this is what others have been told, but I am currently seeking Med-surge for now because of this.
  6. 0
    My recruiter tells me that med surg is at 100% capacity right now. He said the Navy isnt looking for med surg, they are looking for critical care and trauma nurses, including periop and operative. I'm not sure where your recruiter is getting his/her information CaitsMommy, but Critical Care has ALWAYS been a need in military nursing.
  7. 0
    People, please remember to take EVERYTHING from the recruiter with a grain of salt. I can tell you first hand that our med/surg floors are understaffed as well as the critical care areas. Your assignment in the hospital depends on many things. Apply regardless of where they say that they need nurses. Every hospital is going to be different in there needs. Your placement will ultimately depend on where the new nurse coordinator puts you, which can be negotiable depending on your long term goals.
  8. 0
    Quote from navyman7
    People, please remember to take EVERYTHING from the recruiter with a grain of salt. I can tell you first hand that our med/surg floors are understaffed as well as the critical care areas. Your assignment in the hospital depends on many things. Apply regardless of where they say that they need nurses. Every hospital is going to be different in there needs. Your placement will ultimately depend on where the new nurse coordinator puts you, which can be negotiable depending on your long term goals.
    Thank you, i am glad you clarified that. I have accepted a med-surg position and would hope that the basis of what I learn on the floor will help me in whatever role I assume when I apply and hopefully get accepted into active duty.


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