Military vs civilian nursing curicculum?

  1. 0 All,
    I'm a 91W in the reserves planning my next career move as I approach 60 college credits.

    I have been to a civillian nursing program but found the dominance of psychosocial curicculum to be disapointing. There is so much more to being a nurse than psychology and sociology but it was impossible to see that there. I could easily see myself as a nurse but never could I imagine that I could put up with that curicculum for 2 years.

    Are the military programs, by any chance different?
  2. Enjoy this?

    Join thousands and get our weekly Nursing Insights newsletter with the hottest discussions, articles, and toons.

  3. Visit  Weebils-Wobble profile page

    About Weebils-Wobble

    From 'Texas'; Joined Jun '05; Posts: 24.

    14 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  live4today profile page
    0
    If you "found the dominance of psychosocial curriculum to be disappointing", then you will not make a good nurse. Why? Caring for patients INCLUDES caring for their "psychosocial" behavior and problems. The two cannot be separated in nursing which is why those courses are required subject matters. From the patients admission to the patients discharge from the hospital, you will be up close and personal in their psychosocial issues no matter what unit you work on.
  5. Visit  Weebils-Wobble profile page
    0
    Quote from cheerfuldoer
    If you "found the dominance of psychosocial curriculum to be disappointing", then you will not make a good nurse. Why? Caring for patients INCLUDES caring for their "psychosocial" behavior and problems. The two cannot be separated in nursing which is why those courses are required subject matters. From the patients admission to the patients discharge from the hospital, you will be up close and personal in their psychosocial issues no matter what unit you work on.

    Caring for and about patients is not really all that complicated. Not only would I make a good nurse but I would excel apparently. I take knowledge for granted that it takes nursing programs years to teach. I see no reason for such tedious focus on common sense.

    There was a disconnect between what I observed nurses doing in the real world and what I found in the curicculum. I can't help but think that there must be a better way to train them. I carried a high "B" in the coursework but felt that I had learned very little new information except for the skills labs that were virtually free of the didactic work.

    I thought that I may find that difference in military curicculum as is found in other skills that I've observed.
  6. Visit  Weebils-Wobble profile page
    0
    BTW,
    Is there such a thing as a military nursing school?

    If there isn't, why has nobody mentioned that?

    It would explain the lack of response to the original question. I often take for granted what I perceive as obvious as being automaticly included universaly.
  7. Visit  Weebils-Wobble profile page
    0
    Well,

    Am I banned yet? Speaking one's mind is usually fatal in nursing.

    I tried to post a more specific question so I could avoid off-topic discussion but I can't post a new thread.

    I understand why nurses would feel protective of nursing theory but please don't expect me to lie to you so you will like me. I understand the need to avoid anything that is not pro-nursing.

    Never wanted a conversation about it actually. Just thought I could get some good information from those that would know.
  8. Visit  Nurse Ratched profile page
    0
    You're not banned. If you can't start a new topic, are you trying to start one in a premium member format? That's the only restriction you would have.

    I'm not at all sure that there is a military nursing curriculum. I always presumed someone would go to a "civie" program but have it paid for by the military. I'm looking forward to hearing if it's otherwise.
  9. Visit  RNPATL profile page
    0
    Why would you think that you would be banned? I have been on this forum and board for several years now and know that members post their views on many different topics and don't get banned. There are those that violate the rules and yes, they get warned and if necessary banned, but not for posting a respectful opinion.

    As far as military nursing schools, I am not aware of any. I would certainly be interested to learn if there are any.
  10. Visit  Weebils-Wobble profile page
    0
    I guess I had the wrong impression. I thought I had a straight-forward question. I tried to not put anything too controversial in it but wanted to provide a little background information.

    The only one that posted did so because they took exception to a comment. With all the views of my thread with no responses, I just figured I was getting the silent treatment. Military nurses gotta know the answer, so I think they aren't posting because they took exception too. A bunch of regulars on a BB taking exception to what you say seems bad juju.

    Anyhow, thanks for posting to me.
  11. Visit  RNPATL profile page
    0
    Quote from Weebils-Wobble
    I guess I had the wrong impression. I thought I had a straight-forward question. I tried to not put anything too controversial in it but wanted to provide a little background information.

    The only one that posted did so because they took exception to a comment. With all the views of my thread with no responses, I just figured I was getting the silent treatment. Military nurses gotta know the answer, so I think they aren't posting because they took exception too. A bunch of regulars on a BB taking exception to what you say seems bad juju.

    Anyhow, thanks for posting to me.
    As the moderator for this forum, I have found that the military folks here are very helpful if they know the answer. Perhaps many of the views were regulars passing by and, like you, were wondering if indeed there is a military training program for nurses. From what I have seen and read, I don't think there is, but perhaps someone out there might know.
  12. Visit  CPT_Jana profile page
    0
    There is no military nursing (i.e. BSN producing) program at this time. There have been programs in the past (WRAIN is the one that comes to mind) and I had heard that in light of the global nursing shortage from which the military is not immune there was a thought of bringing the concept back. The Army sponsors advanced training programs in critical care, emergency care, OB/GYN, community health, and psych. There are also military-run MSN programs for FNP, periop CNS, and CRNA. There is an Army LVN/LPN program. It produces an enlisted soldier with the credentials of combat medic + civilian LVN/LPN licensure.

    Sorry, but I can only really speak to Army-specific programs. Not sure if that answers your question or not - but there you go!

    Jana
  13. Visit  mwbeah profile page
    0
    1. Facts.


    a. The AMEDD Enlisted Commissioning Program (AECP) provides eligible active duty soldiers the opportunity to complete a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN), become a registered nurse (RN), and be commissioned in the Army Nurse Corps (active component). Participants continue to receive their current pay and allowances during school while in the program for up to 24 consecutive months of enrollment. This program funds academic costs of up to $3,000 per semester or $2,250 per quarter.



    b. Deadline for receipt of applications for FY is July. The selection board will convene on ____________. No exceptions for late applications will be considered.

    You may want to check this out, it is the only "military" option I know for RN.

    CPT Mike
  14. Visit  mwbeah profile page
    0
    Quote from mwbeah
    1. Facts.


    a. The AMEDD Enlisted Commissioning Program (AECP) provides eligible active duty soldiers the opportunity to complete a baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN), become a registered nurse (RN), and be commissioned in the Army Nurse Corps (active component). Participants continue to receive their current pay and allowances during school while in the program for up to 24 consecutive months of enrollment. This program funds academic costs of up to $3,000 per semester or $2,250 per quarter.



    b. Deadline for receipt of applications for FY is July. The selection board will convene on ____________. No exceptions for late applications will be considered.

    You may want to check this out, it is the only "military" option I know for RN.

    CPT Mike
    Here is the link:

    http://www.usarec.army.mil/AECP/
  15. Visit  Weebils-Wobble profile page
    0
    Thanks for the link,

    Since I have more school to do, an age waiver is the thing.

    Everything I've seen says that the Guard can only waive up to 35 y/o for a commission. A warrant officer goes up to 46(I'm 44)but you must complete WOCS before 46. I wouldn't be offered a commission until completing the BSN. That's at least 3 years from my credits now if I could get an online ADN.

    If there were such thing as an online ADN that would take my first semester for credit, I could get that done. All one has to do for the program is get accepted to an RN-BSN with <24 months to complete with 36 months service left.

    I have plenty of service left, my APFT scores are good(220s right now), I have some awards, My chain would write glorius LORs and I have the mental capacity to endure an accelerated program. The fact that the age waiver would be difficult to count on would make it impractical I think.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top