Military Nurse

  1. 0
    Risking sounding like an idiot... here goes:
    I want to do something involving the military, whether that be military intel/ intelligence analyst or a nurse. Most likely nurse, but I have a few questions if anyone can help me out!! I am looking at becoming an RN at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville's nursing.

    1. What exactly is the difference between a military nurse and a civilian nurse that works on the base, can you be a civilian nurse working on a base?

    2. is my BSN enough?

    3. Can anyone enlighten me on what EXACTLY the military nursing experience is like.. are you always with the military? how do you choose a branch? what do you usually do?


    Thanks!!!
    Last edit by keegs13 on Apr 28, '10
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  3. 29 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    You are sure starting from scratch here. lol.
    A BSN is the appropriate degree to commission as a nurse in the AF, Army, or Navy. It is competetive to get in, so watch your GPA.
    Start by looking at the various service sites (airforce.com, etc) and review what each says about their branch.
    You sign up initially for a set number of years and re-sign as you go. You can sign up for as few as 3 years to start (which is a good way to test the waters).
    I hope that starts answering your questions. Good luck.
  5. 0
    Yeah pretty much starting from scratch.. but that's ok i have time, I'm applying to college this year. Thank you so much! Your answers did help!!
  6. 0
    I choose AF because I like the bases and their mission. From what I hear your day to day job in the AF is like a civilian job except you are taking care of airmen, their families, and retirees. The difference comes in when you are deployed and we will all deploy.

    You can be a civilian nurse working on a military base but they usually require experience. On the other hand they will let you come in active duty without experience.

    1st yo uneed to get a BSN, I love nursing. With a nursing degree the options are endless. Nurses are everywhere. Some never see a patient and some never see blood. Others are in critical areas and love it. We are educators, researchers, scientists, patient care givers, practitioners, consultants, sales reps, and more. If you think of something you want to do, a nurse can tie into if they wanted too. But you do have to make it through school and nursing school can be quite tough. Good luck
  7. 0
    Thank you very much for your input!! all the info i can get helps!! Looking at nursing, i really like it because i like to travel, help people, and to me, our military are my heroes and i just want to help! Would I be able to get experience in college if i did an internship or something of the like while working at a hospital? (University of Tennessee, Knoxville hospital). How competitive is nursing school? avg. GPA?


    Thanks again!,
    Kaitlyn.
  8. 0
    And if you consider going Reserves - keep in mind that many if not most reserve medical staff are seeing deployment in one form or another.
  9. 0
    Thank you for all the responses so far,they are really helping to guide me - i have a few more:

    1. with a BSN, would i be able to do ICU, or is further education required, if i do get experience working/volunteering at a hospital on campus or near by?

    2. Personally, what degree would you recommend?
    Last edit by keegs13 on Apr 30, '10
  10. 0
    Quote from keegs13
    risking sounding like an idiot... here goes:
    i want to do something involving the military, whether that be military intel/ intelligence analyst or a nurse. most likely nurse, but i have a few questions if anyone can help me out!! i am looking at becoming an rn at the university of tennessee, knoxville's nursing.

    1. what exactly is the difference between a military nurse and a civilian nurse that works on the base, can you be a civilian nurse working on a base? as far as being a nurse there is no difference. but the difference is civilian nurses get ot, night diff etc. military nurses do not get this but they can take time off without using benefit time etc. also military nurse can go on deployments where civilian nurses will not.

    2. is my bsn enough? for a start, but if you stay in and want to get promoted you will need a masters. each service has its own requirments. it might not be in the reqs. that a masters is required, but if you do not have one you will not be considered by the promotion board as being "qualified" to be promoted.

    3. can anyone enlighten me on what exactly the military nursing experience is like.. are you always with the military? how do you choose a branch? what do you usually do? to me there is not much of difference in the two. each has its pluses & minuses. in order for you to choose which you will need to investigate each service and find the best fit for you. your first hitch is 8 years, depending on your contract your active duty time can be as little as 3 years with the other 5 in the reserves. one thing about being a officer, you are a officer until you resign your commission. what i mean about this is say you have done your 8 years and do not resign several years later you might be getting a phone call stating you need to report because you are being activited.


    thanks!!!
    good luck with finishing school.
  11. 0
    Thank you so much for the answers! I just have one more to add on to the last question : The first contract is always 8 years? and what does deployment consist of?

    if it helps i am seriously considering either air force (in flight nurse/icu) or army(icu).etc.
  12. 0
    The first contract can be as little at 3 years active duty. There will be tagged onto your paperwork that you will be inactive reserves for 5 years. this means you will end your active duty time in service and be released to be a civilian again, but... if they need your occupation, you are may get a call and need to stay active for that additional time. I was inactive reserves in the army for 5 years back during desert storm. I never got called, but knew I would have to go if they did call.

    In the Air Force, as a new grad RN, you choose 1 of 2 paths. OB or med/surg. After the initial 5 week commissioned officer training (COT), in Alabama, you will be going to the nurse transition program (NTP) for like 3months. then you get your first duty station. You get a preference list where you can hope you get a certain base, but the military will place you where they need you. Most people seem to get a place on their lists. At airforce.com, you can look at potential bases. A long term goal to be ICU or flight nurse would take a few years investment in your career, you won't go in to that immediately.

    I am signing up for 4 years and get a $30,000 bonus. there are many different bonus options that may serve you well. 6 years can mean $20,000 bonus and $20,000 student loan repayment.

    Good luck. Keep researching.


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