Kind of a weird question...

  1. OK, so you all know I got medically disqualified for applying for the NCP because I have a few kidney stones...boo hoo. I'm working with a new recruiter now, so hopefully he'll work some magic...

    Anyways, I have been reading some military books like "flags of our fathers" and some others and they all seem to think "lying" to get into the military is a heroic thing. LIke, "oh, he said he was 18 but he was really 14 so he could enlist in the marines..." or "he used someone else's urine sample to pass the medical test..." and I keep reading how they could have taken the easy way out and used their medical problems to not go into the military but that they "found a way around it" and got in. (this being back in WW2 time...)

    But I keep hearing about how you have to disclose every itty bitty piece of medical history you have and if you don't they'll find out (although I know this isn't always true) and you'll go to jail, etc.

    Do you think I should have not said I had kidney stones? I mean, I know the answer to that is no if i want to be honest, but it seems like if I "really" wanted to be in the military I would have said no. So does my recruiter think I really didn't want to join by disclosing that info?

    I'm just rambling here...any thoughts?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   live4rachael
    Here's my two cents... Being in the military and having gone through the entire MEPS process and revealing my medical history, etc., I don't see any need to lie. You do want to disclose your history, not only because it can be a fraudulent enlistment, but also because it may be important down the road should something surface that is related. (You tell your civilian docs your medical history to better help you; same thing.) I can't imagine a recruiter thinking you didn't want to join because you revealed that information. They deal with folks all the time who reveal that stuff (and much worse!) Going to another recruiter wouldn't hurt, and you can always ping them about waivers and working around things like that... there's no guarantee, but if it's something you want, just keep plugging around as best you can.
    Again, just my 2 cents...
  4. by   Gennaver
    Quote from smattles1of2
    OK, so you all know I got medically disqualified for applying for the NCP because I have a few kidney stones.....

    But I keep hearing about how you have to disclose every itty bitty piece of medical history you have and if you don't they'll find out (although I know this isn't always true) and you'll go to jail, etc.

    Do you think I should have not said I had kidney stones? I mean, I know the answer to that is no if i want to be honest, but it seems like if I "really" wanted to be in the military I would have said no. So does my recruiter think I really didn't want to join by disclosing that info?

    I'm just rambling here...any thoughts?
    Hello,
    First, I hope that you get your waiver! I remember reading that if you have been stoneless for a certain amount of time that it is hopeful.

    Secondly, while we are required to disclose many things that are "relevant" I do believe that we need to be honest first and then to back up why we request a waiver.

    The meps website even says that while they want you to be honest they do not want you to "bring" up things that they do not ask about.

    I think if one were to be dishonest and then a pre existing condition were later discovered then it would be dishonorable grounds, versus being honest and getting a "clear" waiver upfront.

    Good luck!!
    Gen
  5. by   smattles1of2
    Thanks for the responses. I didn't want to lie or anything and i'm not going too I was just sitting around tonight reading a book and it got me thinking. So I thought maybe I would be looked at as taking the easy way out but I really do want to get in! Oh well...hopefully it'll happen but if not, I know I tried.
  6. by   navynurse06
    if you "really" didn't want to be in the military you wouldn't have gone to a recruiter in the 1st place! (at least i hope you wouldn't have ).
    so i don't think anyone would think that since you were honest about a pre-existing condition. also, another reason the military is so strict about being honest with you medical information is b/c it could be dangerous for many if you were in a certain situation where people's life were at stake and you medical problems affect your performance. (not that kidney stones could affect you in that way, but you get my point). furthermore, its costs the government a lot of money if someone who has a pre-existing medical condition (one that would not allow entry into the military) enters the service then gets medically discharged for said condition. does that make sense? if you are medically discharged you then stand the chance of getting a service connection disability; which means you get some or all healthcare paid for. plus any other pay you might receive from this discharge. see how i what i mean when i said it could cost the government a lot of money?
    any how....now that i’m off that soapbox...good luck with your new recruiter...i hope it works out for you.
    keep us updated.
    ens pm
  7. by   smattles1of2
    Thank you for your replies!

    Sorry I haven't been back to respond. Just started nursing school this week and it's been crazy.

    No new updates so far. My new recruiter just got permission from his OPO to be my recruiter and is now requesting my kit from my old recruiter. I hope it works out ok! If he can get me in, I'm going to have to think of something to thank him.

    Thanks all for listening to me go on and on

    edited to add...even if he can't get me in, i'm going to thank him for all his hard work. He's definitely been a big help!
  8. by   Gennaver
    Quote from smattles1of2
    Thank you for your replies!

    Sorry I haven't been back to respond. Just started nursing school this week and it's been crazy.

    No new updates so far. My new recruiter just got permission from his OPO to be my recruiter and is now requesting my kit from my old recruiter. I hope it works out ok! If he can get me in, I'm going to have to think of something to thank him.

    Thanks all for listening to me go on and on

    edited to add...even if he can't get me in, i'm going to thank him for all his hard work. He's definitely been a big help!
    Good luck!
    Try to be patient, that is soooo hard.

    Also, if for any reason your stones keep you out, (this time around) why not try again after you are stone-free for a year?

    I've read reports online, (sure you can google Kidney stones and Iraq) that there had been problems with soldiers having kidney stones while serving in the desert due to dehyrdation or insufficient hydration and it was troublesome. So, it makes sense about the stones.

    Good luck! and again, Good luck!! (with both nursing school and getting in!)
    Gen
  9. by   DanznRN
    Smattles-

    I gotta say who cares about kidney stones. My wife had them before she came on active duty and they didn't bat an eyelash about it. How many stones are we talking and how often are they occurring? I know kids who have gotten in the Navy with Asthma and that's huge. Something else has to be up for them not to take you, get the new recruiter to THOROUGHLY review your package, that just doesn't seem right. Let us know.

    LCDR(s) Dan
  10. by   cinja
    Have you heard of anyone get in after they had gastric bypass surgery?
  11. by   Gennaver
    Quote from cinja
    Have you heard of anyone get in after they had gastric bypass surgery?
    Hello,
    Most likely it seems like it would fit in the category at Meps where you must disclose all hospitilizations, operations and documentation of release from your doctor, (post surgical).

    If this was elective I would imagine that it would be similar to any other elective surgery.

    However, whatever conditions may have precluded this elective surgery may have been dq'able, not sure at all. Best to give it a shot.

    Not sure if it requires a waiver though but, may indeed require documentation. You will get a chance to speak with the Meps physician regarding your paperwork that you fill out in the beginning of meps.
    Gen

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