Jon Stewart Puzzled Why Combat Medics Can't Apply for Nursing Jobs - page 4

by kabfighter

11,594 Views | 49 Comments

A friend of mine posted this on Facebook, and it made me scratch my head a bit. Combat medics undoubtedly serve an important and difficult role, but Stewart appears to be comparing apples and oranges. It seems that states'... Read More


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    I think we have covered the standard "medic" (i.e. Army 68W, and Navy Corpsman) but if we look at the special forces medics and independent duty corpsman, they are really on a different level and about as close to a PA as you can be without actually being a PA. Not that their training translates directly to a nursing job or degree either.
  2. 1
    Quote from jeckrn
    Yes, them most qualified should be accepted but if 2 people are equal it should go to the vet.
    Not in my opinion.

    Not all vets are created equal nor are all of them worthy of a step in front.

    If you want to say decorated combat veteran, I'd be inclined to agree... but just being a vet is nothing special... and I'm one.
    gypsyd8 likes this.
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    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Not in my opinion.

    Not all vets are created equal nor are all of them worthy of a step in front.

    If you want to say decorated combat veteran, I'd be inclined to agree... but just being a vet is nothing special... and I'm one.
    If a vet is "qualified" they should get a leg up on someone who is not a vet.

    Just because you are not a "decorated combat veteran" does not mean that you have not made sacrifices for the country. Many have served in a combat zone and have not been decorated but were in harms way.
    anie10 and CountyRat like this.
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    Quote from jeckrn
    Yes, them most qualified should be accepted but if 2 people are equal it should go to the vet.
    I could live with that.
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    It depends on what kind of corpsman or medic they were. I tell you what I was a corpsman for 5 years and I agree. I should be given some kind of civilian certification where I got nothing. But I am so thankful for serving because I experienced some things some civilian nurses never will. Also because the military has paid for my degree. I do know that in California you can take the nclex to becone an lvn both during and after service.
  6. 0
    Please sign the petition at Change.org to ask Jon Stewart to make amends for his comments
    Petition | Jon Stewart: Make amends for ridiculing nursing on The Daily Show | Change.org

    Thank you!
  7. 0
    I agree with most of the comment on here so far; however, the one thing that really struck me as I listened to this:

    I would be really PO'ed if I were a school nurse.
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    I have been a combat medic and EMT-B instructor for 8 years. I am currently a AECP Soldier who is in nursing school and will be finishing in MAY. My "medic" training only helped me maybe in the first couple of months of nursing school. I worked before at Madigan in the ER as a shift leader of my medics with the nurses there. That basically is my background and based upon my own personal experience the medic training taught me the "how's" and nursing school is now teaching me the "why's".

    I can't speak for LPN/LVN training (68WM6) but my nursing school (BSN) is way more advanced than medic training. You see a lot as a medic but nursing school really sets you up for a higher standard of care. There is a reason that medic's don't diagnose but nurses can (nursing diagnosis). Now medic training can be recognized as a civilian school can transfer some of your medic training to credits toward prerequisites for nursing school but believe me being a medic (even an advanced one with lots of experience) from my experience is not the same caliber as BSN.
    Pixie.RN and SummitRN like this.
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    One more thing, as a medic I was trained on a specific skill (trauma) on a specific demographic (relatively healthy service members). Yes in EMT school you go over briefly stuff like delivering a baby in an emergency situation but that's not the same as nursing school when you have 72 hours of clinic on a OB/GYN unit on top of a 3 semester hour class. That's just one example of many, nurses are trained on a wide range of patient populations and have many hours of clinical training to re-enforce it.
    Pixie.RN likes this.
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    Wow............how absurd.......ridiculous and slightly hilarious! I have been both. Joined the Army after 9/11 and trained as a combat medic which they had just changed the title to "healthcare specialist." By far an awesome MOS to hold in the Army and proud to serve to the core. When I discharged, the experience gave me the nudge to pursue nursing. I now have my RN license. It is not the same. I have also been an LVN. I will say this about an LVN too with the combat medic...."it is not what we do, but what we know." I can go on with the elaborate details of the difference in the depth of patho physiology, treatments, care plan process, pharmacology, disease process, interventions, evidence based practice, and yes even Anatomy. Anatomy in the other didactic training is generalized and on other topics: it's barely even touched if at all. Combat medics are trained in emergency medicine to generalize and LVNs are are trained in practicality with general foundation of the process. An LVN is more equipped to challenge the NCLEX than a combat medic but still not appropriate.
    jeckrn likes this.


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