Jon Stewart Puzzled Why Combat Medics Can't Apply for Nursing Jobs - page 3

by kabfighter

11,528 Views | 49 Comments

A friend of mine posted this on Facebook, and it made me scratch my head a bit. Combat medics undoubtedly serve an important and difficult role, but Stewart appears to be comparing apples and oranges. It seems that states'... Read More


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    Hmmm, I didn't know that. Where I'm at school nurses have BSNs, I believe. I love my kiddo's school nurse.
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    You don't even have to have a CNA to be a "nurse" in my kids' school district. It's horrible. There should be some standard regulation about that across states
  3. 1
    Quote from jt43
    You don't even have to have a CNA to be a "nurse" in my kids' school district. It's horrible. There should be some standard regulation about that across states
    that not good. my mother is a school nurse and has her msn, and years of experience. granted its more of a retirement job, but she makes good money for it. (high cost of living area, of course). With all the things I hear her dealing with, I have no idea how a CNA would do that job and not let someone get seriously injured.
    medic9872 likes this.
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    Quote from kabfighter
    . Jon Stewart correctly points out that combat medics are obviously qualified for EMT-P certification, but starts the segment reading qualifications for nursing positions. Additionally, the physician assistant position was designed to give medics from the Vietnam era an avenue to civilian employment, but that now takes six years of education rather than the two it required when the occupation was born.
    Sorry but as a soldier and seen the training that 68W's recieve they are just over EMT-B trained. Then can do some advance treatments but have no training on medications, EKG rhythms etc. It was not until the last couple of months that flight medics started to recieve paramedic training. This was a shame because about all they could do was but in a IV and patch the wounds, and not much else. Most medics would not take much education to get them up to an EMT-P level.
    wooh likes this.
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    PMFB RN,
    Thanks for posting this. I have encouraged many of our corpsmen to do the same. Then do a LPN-BSN type program. We also have nurses working with us who were able to test the AD program too. I believe they were E-6's and above though (IDC chiefs). Great program!
  6. 2
    Quote from moneybarb

    Do you want those such as the mayor, governor and FEMA to run your health care?

    Makes as much sense as the current situation: some health insurance bureaucrat making my health care decisions.
    elkpark and wooh like this.
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    Just received this and there are some positions available with the Department of Veterans Affars where a combat vet can apply for a pilot program called Intermediate Care Tech and they would work in an Emergency Room setting under the supervison of an MD. Hope this helps.




    Quote from kabfighter
    A friend of mine posted this on Facebook, and it made me scratch my head a bit. Combat medics undoubtedly serve an important and difficult role, but Stewart appears to be comparing apples and oranges. It seems that states' licensing bodies for emergency medical technicians are more to blame for the problems experienced by these two fine people than the fact that medic experience is not sufficient to qualify for the NCLEX and become a nurse. Jon Stewart correctly points out that combat medics are obviously qualified for EMT-P certification, but starts the segment reading qualifications for nursing positions. Additionally, the physician assistant position was designed to give medics from the Vietnam era an avenue to civilian employment, but that now takes six years of education rather than the two it required when the occupation was born.

    I think there should be better opportunities for veterans, but I don't think that nursing is the problem here.


    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/we...n-for-veterans
    SummitRN likes this.
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    An important issue is that the military can do something that is not possible in civilian healthcare: they can create a medic's scope of practice as needed to suit his or her mission. As a result, military medics might have the same training and rank, but be assigned to very different missions. Some medics will serve there entire "hitch" in a military outpatient clinic, while another might be assigned as a combat medic. Most will do neither, but rather, work in some intermediate capacity where their clinical experience might vary tremendously. All will leave the military as experienced medics, but the nature of their experience will vary tremendously. That, I think, is why medics should complete a nursing education before sitting for the board exam. As for giving vets preference in enrollment and hiring, I am all for that. They have served their country, and I think that in doing so, they have earned a place at the head of the line. And no, I am not a vet, just a grateful civilian nurse.
    JillyRN and LearningByMistakes like this.
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    Quote from CountyRat
    As for giving vets preference in enrollment and hiring, I am all for that. They have served their country, and I think that in doing so, they have earned a place at the head of the line.
    Nope... simply take the best, most talented applicants.
  10. 1
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Nope... simply take the best, most talented applicants.
    Yes, them most qualified should be accepted but if 2 people are equal it should go to the vet.
    SycamoreGuy likes this.


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