Jon Stewart Puzzled Why Combat Medics Can't Apply for Nursing Jobs - pg.3 | allnurses

Jon Stewart Puzzled Why Combat Medics Can't Apply for Nursing Jobs - page 3

A friend of mine posted this on Facebook, and it made me scratch my head a bit. Combat medics undoubtedly serve an important and difficult role, but Stewart appears to be comparing apples and... Read More

  1. Visit  Jackleroy profile page
    1
    Just received this and there are some positions available with the Department of Veterans Affars where a combat vet can apply for a pilot program called Intermediate Care Tech and they would work in an Emergency Room setting under the supervison of an MD. Hope this helps.




    Quote from kabfighter
    A friend of mine posted this on Facebook, and it made me scratch my head a bit. Combat medics undoubtedly serve an important and difficult role, but Stewart appears to be comparing apples and oranges. It seems that states' licensing bodies for emergency medical technicians are more to blame for the problems experienced by these two fine people than the fact that medic experience is not sufficient to qualify for the NCLEX and become a nurse. Jon Stewart correctly points out that combat medics are obviously qualified for EMT-P certification, but starts the segment reading qualifications for nursing positions. Additionally, the physician assistant position was designed to give medics from the Vietnam era an avenue to civilian employment, but that now takes six years of education rather than the two it required when the occupation was born.

    I think there should be better opportunities for veterans, but I don't think that nursing is the problem here.


    http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/we...n-for-veterans
    SummitRN likes this.
  2. Visit  CountyRat profile page
    2
    An important issue is that the military can do something that is not possible in civilian healthcare: they can create a medic's scope of practice as needed to suit his or her mission. As a result, military medics might have the same training and rank, but be assigned to very different missions. Some medics will serve there entire "hitch" in a military outpatient clinic, while another might be assigned as a combat medic. Most will do neither, but rather, work in some intermediate capacity where their clinical experience might vary tremendously. All will leave the military as experienced medics, but the nature of their experience will vary tremendously. That, I think, is why medics should complete a nursing education before sitting for the board exam. As for giving vets preference in enrollment and hiring, I am all for that. They have served their country, and I think that in doing so, they have earned a place at the head of the line. And no, I am not a vet, just a grateful civilian nurse.
    JillyRN and LearningByMistakes like this.
  3. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    0
    Quote from CountyRat
    As for giving vets preference in enrollment and hiring, I am all for that. They have served their country, and I think that in doing so, they have earned a place at the head of the line.
    Nope... simply take the best, most talented applicants.
  4. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    1
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Nope... simply take the best, most talented applicants.
    Yes, them most qualified should be accepted but if 2 people are equal it should go to the vet.
    SycamoreGuy likes this.
  5. Visit  SycamoreGuy profile page
    0
    I think we have covered the standard "medic" (i.e. Army 68W, and Navy Corpsman) but if we look at the special forces medics and independent duty corpsman, they are really on a different level and about as close to a PA as you can be without actually being a PA. Not that their training translates directly to a nursing job or degree either.
  6. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    1
    Quote from jeckrn
    Yes, them most qualified should be accepted but if 2 people are equal it should go to the vet.
    Not in my opinion.

    Not all vets are created equal nor are all of them worthy of a step in front.

    If you want to say decorated combat veteran, I'd be inclined to agree... but just being a vet is nothing special... and I'm one.
    gypsyd8 likes this.
  7. Visit  jeckrn profile page
    2
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    Not in my opinion.

    Not all vets are created equal nor are all of them worthy of a step in front.

    If you want to say decorated combat veteran, I'd be inclined to agree... but just being a vet is nothing special... and I'm one.
    If a vet is "qualified" they should get a leg up on someone who is not a vet.

    Just because you are not a "decorated combat veteran" does not mean that you have not made sacrifices for the country. Many have served in a combat zone and have not been decorated but were in harms way.
    anie10 and CountyRat like this.
  8. Visit  CountyRat profile page
    0
    Quote from jeckrn
    Yes, them most qualified should be accepted but if 2 people are equal it should go to the vet.
    I could live with that.
  9. Visit  mrobinson69600 profile page
    0
    It depends on what kind of corpsman or medic they were. I tell you what I was a corpsman for 5 years and I agree. I should be given some kind of civilian certification where I got nothing. But I am so thankful for serving because I experienced some things some civilian nurses never will. Also because the military has paid for my degree. I do know that in California you can take the nclex to becone an lvn both during and after service.
  10. Visit  FrancineRNfrannie profile page
    0
    Please sign the petition at Change.org to ask Jon Stewart to make amends for his comments
    Petition | Jon Stewart: Make amends for ridiculing nursing on The Daily Show | Change.org

    Thank you!
  11. Visit  psu_213 profile page
    0
    I agree with most of the comment on here so far; however, the one thing that really struck me as I listened to this:

    I would be really PO'ed if I were a school nurse.
  12. Visit  ncox1 profile page
    2
    I have been a combat medic and EMT-B instructor for 8 years. I am currently a AECP Soldier who is in nursing school and will be finishing in MAY. My "medic" training only helped me maybe in the first couple of months of nursing school. I worked before at Madigan in the ER as a shift leader of my medics with the nurses there. That basically is my background and based upon my own personal experience the medic training taught me the "how's" and nursing school is now teaching me the "why's".

    I can't speak for LPN/LVN training (68WM6) but my nursing school (BSN) is way more advanced than medic training. You see a lot as a medic but nursing school really sets you up for a higher standard of care. There is a reason that medic's don't diagnose but nurses can (nursing diagnosis). Now medic training can be recognized as a civilian school can transfer some of your medic training to credits toward prerequisites for nursing school but believe me being a medic (even an advanced one with lots of experience) from my experience is not the same caliber as BSN.
    Pixie.RN and SummitRN like this.
  13. Visit  ncox1 profile page
    1
    One more thing, as a medic I was trained on a specific skill (trauma) on a specific demographic (relatively healthy service members). Yes in EMT school you go over briefly stuff like delivering a baby in an emergency situation but that's not the same as nursing school when you have 72 hours of clinic on a OB/GYN unit on top of a 3 semester hour class. That's just one example of many, nurses are trained on a wide range of patient populations and have many hours of clinical training to re-enforce it.
    Pixie.RN likes this.


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