Can I join military as an LVN?

  1. 0
    Hi everyone. I am new to the boards here.
    I will be graduating LVN school in Aug.06' and sit the boards. My goal is to begin working toward my RN immediately(fall 06).
    I am currently looking into schools and various programs thru-out Texas.

    Befor I decided to begin a medical career, I worked as a commercial diver and hyperbaric tech. I have worked with the Coast Gaurd and Army Corps. of Engineers on many projects and have always wanted to join the military. I am quickly approaching 30.

    My question ( I can not seem to get specific info. from Gov. sites)-
    Basically need to know;
    Is it a possibility to join military as an LVN? and then pursue an RN?

    Thanks anybody,
    c.sides
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  4. 12 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    yes you can. You would be enlisted, and you prob would get higher rank. I think you would still have to go to 91w school, emt training... first responder stuff and all. You want to go to RN school right away go reserve, they do have a program that will send you to school for
    RN but you might have to wait and all... this program is for active.
  6. 0
    yes, it is possible. i was a navy corpsman before i went to LPN school. there were LPN's that still had to go through the medic school (about 4 months) but with you being an LPN it will be a breeze. they basically just teach you bedside care, injections, foleys, IV's, medication administration, very basic pharmocology, EMT stuff, documentation. it is no-where near what you have to learn in LPN school..... when you graduate you should come out as an E-4 (a 3rd class petty officer). i think it would be a good choice. i loved the navy, and the training was top-notch.. especially on the job. that is where you learn the most.... good luck to you.
  7. 0
    ohhh, another thing. after your corps-school in the USN (if that is the branch you decide to go in) they let the students pick their first duty assignment. and they go by grades. and trust me, they will have slots open for everywhere across the united states and abroad. if you are the type that wants to be stationed near home, you will probably want that option. your grades should be top notch, already being an LPN and all..... but for those less fortunate.... the ones with crummy grades,,,, well,,,, they get last dibs..... so that ought to be good news to you.
  8. 0
    Thanks, all, for responding. The info. is encouraging.
    C-
  9. 0
    I was a Navy Nurse for ten years, and I worked with alot of nurses who had initially been corpsmen, and were able to get into a program called MECP Medical Enlisted Commissioning Program), which once completed, allowed them to be commissioned into the Navy Nurse Corps as an officer. There are requirements for some college courses being completed on your own, and this, along with other factors are considered in the selection process. Your LVN status would give you a jump on this. This program will send you to school to complete your B.S.N. (while paying you). Some of the difficulties reported in going this route was having a schedule that allowed them to take and complete college courses and, of course, there is a war going on, and that is what corpsmen are trained for. So, you might have some detours on your way to becoming an RN. But, I will say, all the MECP nurses I worked with said they would have never done it any other way. There are alot of medical procedures corpsmen can do, that nurses can't as they are dictated by their license. So there experience is invaluable.
  10. 0
    Do not enlist as a med tech. You will be disappointed. Thats what I am!

    I loved my job while I worked in the ICU, but that was very short lived. They are very hard to get into! You do not get to choose your area. You could get stuck taking height and weight for the next few years instead. I was painted a far different picture of what my job actually IS from my recruiter. I am a reservist. We do flight physicals every month. Literally, height, weight, hearing tests, eye exams. I was very lucky and got put into immunizations, which is by far the most interesting job that my unit has. I think you would do your training a far better service to work as an LVN on the outside actually making DECENT money, and comission once you have your bachelors. You cannot commission with an associates.

    The only perks you would get is an extra stripe for being an LVN. Thats what I got. I'm an E-4 now, and only get $175 a weekend when I work. For 2 full days of work. I mean, its not bad, I love being in the Air Force, and I loved being a med tech when I worked in the ICU, but I am currently trying to get in YOUR position now! HA!

    There is a school called Pacific Union out here in California. It has an LVN to RN program designed for Air Force med techs. You can start without having your prereqs done, and it is designed so that you only meet once a month. It is also an 18 month program, much quicker than others. You will only get an associates, though. There is an accellerated bachelors that they offer in the same format. BUT-- this is a very rare program. The only one I know of, actually. The odds that you will get to a position to get into it and have your commander approve are low. Mine isn't even aproving of it just yet, because it will take away from the mission.

    I would kill to be in your shoes of fresh out of LVN school.

    If you DO want to enlist as a med tech, there is a really good program called air evac. It is a subdivision of the med tech program. You go to survival school and you're an LVN on a plane, basically. I wish I had known about that one, too!

    If you have any questions, I think I can answer them pretty well or find out for you. I don't mean to discourage at all, I just don't want you to make an uniformed decision.
  11. 0
    Quote from mistyz23
    Do not enlist as a med tech. You will be disappointed. Thats what I am!

    I loved my job while I worked in the ICU, but that was very short lived. They are very hard to get into! You do not get to choose your area. You could get stuck taking height and weight for the next few years instead. I was painted a far different picture of what my job actually IS from my recruiter. I am a reservist. We do flight physicals every month. Literally, height, weight, hearing tests, eye exams. I was very lucky and got put into immunizations, which is by far the most interesting job that my unit has. I think you would do your training a far better service to work as an LVN on the outside actually making DECENT money, and comission once you have your bachelors. You cannot commission with an associates.

    The only perks you would get is an extra stripe for being an LVN. Thats what I got. I'm an E-4 now, and only get $175 a weekend when I work. For 2 full days of work. I mean, its not bad, I love being in the Air Force, and I loved being a med tech when I worked in the ICU, but I am currently trying to get in YOUR position now! HA!

    There is a school called Pacific Union out here in California. It has an LVN to RN program designed for Air Force med techs. You can start without having your prereqs done, and it is designed so that you only meet once a month. It is also an 18 month program, much quicker than others. You will only get an associates, though. There is an accellerated bachelors that they offer in the same format. BUT-- this is a very rare program. The only one I know of, actually. The odds that you will get to a position to get into it and have your commander approve are low. Mine isn't even aproving of it just yet, because it will take away from the mission.

    I would kill to be in your shoes of fresh out of LVN school.

    If you DO want to enlist as a med tech, there is a really good program called air evac. It is a subdivision of the med tech program. You go to survival school and you're an LVN on a plane, basically. I wish I had known about that one, too!

    If you have any questions, I think I can answer them pretty well or find out for you. I don't mean to discourage at all, I just don't want you to make an uniformed decision.
    $175? I make that in 7 hours as a civilian LVN here in California. You need to go PLDC and get promoted to staff sergeant fast.
  12. 0
    Quote from csides
    Hi everyone. I am new to the boards here.
    I will be graduating LVN school in Aug.06' and sit the boards. My goal is to begin working toward my RN immediately(fall 06).
    I am currently looking into schools and various programs thru-out Texas.

    Befor I decided to begin a medical career, I worked as a commercial diver and hyperbaric tech. I have worked with the Coast Gaurd and Army Corps. of Engineers on many projects and have always wanted to join the military. I am quickly approaching 30.

    My question ( I can not seem to get specific info. from Gov. sites)-
    Basically need to know;
    Is it a possibility to join military as an LVN? and then pursue an RN?

    Thanks anybody,
    c.sides
    First of all, the Army's trying to change the whole LPN classification from 91WM6 to some other MOS classification (I remember when Mike 6's where 91Charlies). I forget, don't really care. Secondly, you'll need PHTLS and EMT to become a fully qualified 91WM6, otherwise they'll tag you as a "Y2" or a non-MOS qualified soldier. You could end up being a 88Mike (truck driver) rather than a warrior medic/nurse if you don't get qualified by 2007 (rumors...rumors). I also heard PHTLS was getting merged with EMT or something to that effect (Google it or ask your recruiter).

    This is assuming you're going reserves. Active, they'll probably send you to Fort Sam Houston and you'll finish all the training you need to become a 91WM6 (Healthcare Specialist). Maybe.

    91WM6 Converts to MOS 68W in Oct 06
    Last edit by Jedi_Iatros on Jan 23, '06
  13. 0
    Quote from Jedi_Iatros
    $175? I make that in 7 hours as a civilian LVN here in California. You need to go PLDC and get promoted to staff sergeant fast.

    I'm a reservist, so pay is hardly worth your time, if at all. I am waiting on my time in service requirement for staff.


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