Burned out and feeling trapped

  1. 0
    I am a Navy nurse currently working in an undesirable department. For the past year, I have put in multiple requests to move to a preferred workspace. However, the "needs of the Navy" currently prevent any such workspace change. Over the past months, I have begun to experience many of the signs of nursing burnout. With no hope to change my workspace, management, or employer, does anyone have any suggestions on what I should do? I love nursing, but if things don't improve, I am seriously considering moving the to civilian, non-nursing world. Has anyone experienced the same things? Right now, my only respites are deployments to Iraq.

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  2. 12 Comments...

  3. 0
    I cannot even say I know how you feel. I know burn out but I have never served in the military-to old.

    I can say I have oriented recently a nurse back from Iraq and she told me that she was a military captain/nurse and thought our life here on the outside was alot harder. I just looked at her and thought wow/told her that/ I look at you and think you are one strong person and I think your life in the miltary is way harder than mine.

    I hope someone who has worn or is wearing your shoes comes along to help you. God Bless and thanks for serving our country.

    Hugs,

    renerian
  4. 0
    Quote from renerian
    I cannot even say I know how you feel. I know burn out but I have never served in the military-to old.

    I can say I have oriented recently a nurse back from Iraq and she told me that she was a military captain/nurse and thought our life here on the outside was alot harder. I just looked at her and thought wow/told her that/ I look at you and think you are one strong person and I think your life in the miltary is way harder than mine.

    I hope someone who has worn or is wearing your shoes comes along to help you. God Bless and thanks for serving our country.

    Hugs,

    renerian
    Renerian-
    Thank you for your comments, that is always nice to hear.

    You say you know burn out... what did you do to fix it? Or what do you know others have tried? Most of what I have read on solutions has been to change the work space, but since that isn't an option for me, I'm looking for other things to try.

    If anyone knows of other ways to like your job again, please share.
  5. 0
    I've never worked in one of the services, but I have worked in a difficult job that I could not leave due to circumstances. So you might try this:

    Write down all the reasons you like your job (add to this why you'd like to stay with the Navy). Put this list in a place you'll see it EVERY DAY, and be sure you read it every day.

    During the day, when something good happens, make a mental note of it; if you are consciously noting the good things in your day, you may not notice the bad things as much.

    Then write down all the things you dislike about your job, major and minor.

    Using your second list, make a list of things that could be changed -- either by you, your supervisor, building manager, or whatever.

    Try and get as many of the changes on your third list implemented as you can. You would be surprised at how the removal of a small annoyance can boost your morale.

    Going back to your second list, look at the things that can't be changed. Now think about the things on that list that you can live with and cross those off. Then take those last -- hopefully very few -- things and speak with your supervisor about them; s/he may be able to change some aspects of your job enough that you won't have to deal with these as much.
  6. 0
    How often do you PCS in the USN? Seems like in the Army, just when you hit maximal frustration/burn-out, it's time to move again (one of the benefits, I guess). I don't know where you are (location, wise), but I would suggest getting involved in outside activities or even activities within your organization (education, research, etc) to help pass the time. Like one of the other posts mentions, seriously evaluate the pros and cons of your situation before making a radical change. Military nursing is not the easiest route, but in my opinion, it is incredibly rewarding!

    Jana
    Graduate Student & Active Army Officer
  7. 0
    One way to get some relief is to go back to school and get the Navy to pay for it. If you go back to get your masters which might actually give you a promotion you will be working less or not at all and just going to school, just take leave to go to school I know people who have done this. I know people who the Navy has granted them leave for up to two years to back to school, though they didn't help with that schooling. It would be a relief to get away from the hospital for awhile, plus it might be fun and interesting to go back to school and expand your education. Good luck. Thanksgiving and Christmas is coming up see if you can get out of state for those holidays go on a vacation. Take some time to yourself, beat up a pillow, taking aerobics classes, do more PT, go to a spa, do something that will help release your tension.
  8. 0
    I'm with jhawk, put in for school. If you not sure what area to work in, get out, and get some more expirience. I've been in for 14 years (CPT), it may not get easier. If your leadership is not sympathetic to your feelings...get out. You are in demand everywhere. Good luck.

    matt
  9. 0
    Everyone-

    Thanks for your advice. School is not an option yet, since I am still at my first duty station and Navy DUINS is an option after a second duty station (yes, I know about the one exception). I have however, found another way out. My current difficulties working in an area I never wanted, and working for a chain that is unsympathic are now moot. In a few weeks, I will return to Iraq, where at least I will be doing the trauma nursing that I love to do.

    Thanks again to all who offered words of advice, they were much appreciated.
  10. 0
    Quote from USNRN309
    I am a Navy nurse currently working in an undesirable department. For the past year, I have put in multiple requests to move to a preferred workspace. However, the "needs of the Navy" currently prevent any such workspace change. Over the past months, I have begun to experience many of the signs of nursing burnout. With no hope to change my workspace, management, or employer, does anyone have any suggestions on what I should do? I love nursing, but if things don't improve, I am seriously considering moving the to civilian, non-nursing world. Has anyone experienced the same things? Right now, my only respites are deployments to Iraq.
    We are also feeling very burnt out here in our ICU. For months and months we have had every bed full, we have done time changes, OT to cover our area. The problem lies in that now as our census is slightly lowerer 1-2 open beds, we are having to float constantly to cover all other areas of the hospital, SDU, pysch, the NH floor and med-surg. We are trying to work out a plan to talk to administration again about our frustration! Any ideas that have worked?? Thank you all!!
  11. 0
    how long do you usually go to Iraq on deployment?


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