Best Branch for Military Nursing? - page 2

by Jennifer22

Hi Everyone, I will be graduating with a BS in Nursing this coming August. I am thinking about joining the military, but am unsure of which branch would be best. I'd like to get more information on which branch would offer... Read More


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    Don't forget the USPHS Commissioned Corps.

    http://www.usphs.gov/multimedia/duty...e/default.aspx

    Not exactly military, but you get the commission, uniform, pay and federal retirement.
    Last edit by POTR on Jun 28, '10
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    Don't take anyones word for what branch of service is the best. Research each branch of service and make a list of the pro and con on your own. All branches offer and promise the moon! I couldn't understand what the services meant by the saying that families were there at the CONVIENIENCE OF THAT INDIVIDUAL SERVICE".
    With deployment cycles becoming more frequent, if you do have a family,you will be required to have a plan of action when you deploy. Be sure that your spouse to be is strong enough to take care of the family and household issues that will come along!

    Families are brought along at the convieniece of the Goverment! Just know this and you will be ok!
    I put 150% in to my work, and neglected what my family needed! After 18 years of marriage, my wife left me and took our girls four hours away and when I got to Alaska, and now because I make one-half of what I was making originally, I can't afford to fly them up here or me fly to where they are!
    I spent time in both the Army and Air Force Nursing Programs.
    Also, make sure You stay well AND not get sick. Be physically fit is also priority to staying in each branch of service.


    Overall I had an Outstanding Time! Just be able to multi-task In both your job AND home life!
    Having a unbiased mind set and knowing what you have to be as a military nurse, you will be pro!
    Start researching your product! Know your expectations will ensurs a fantastic experience no matter what comes along you will be able to handle any challenging situations that may arise!
    RN318, lindarn, and athena55 like this.
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    Hello All!
    Ive been seriously considering joining the military as well esp. since I can not find a JOB. But I already have a family...I went in and spoke with the Army Recruiter he was nice and helpful...he told me to take my time and think about it...that was 6 months ago n Im still undecided. I dont wanna b away from my kids long periods of time and he told me that being in the actual army was better that army reserved. Im really just wanting stability. I do not have a degree but I do have my practical nursing license and eventually will be returning to school for my BSN...so what Im asking is basically the same except I dont do water so Navy is out and Im 29 so the Airforce is out as well...which would be best Army Reserve, National Guard or the full blown Army? Thanx for any insight in advance!!
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    Fantastic growth opportunities come from any Branch of Service. Each has a different mission. I would check out the Air Force since they do take age waivers. I belonged to the Active Duty Army Nurse Corps for over 4 years. I havn't participated in the Army Guard or Reserves. The Guard falls under whatever State jurisdiction you live. You might be called to provide nursing care during a national or state emergency (Take for instance the Midwest is flooding) You may also backfill nursing positions for the Active Duty. Yes, the Army Reserves do seem to be used much more than the other Branches.
    More
    Reserves wi
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    Make sure you read over each Services Regulations. They have all sorts of hidden ideas. Please make sure You understand what education level is required. i believe Active Army Nurses still require a BSN! Keep up the outstanding and caring nursing! We sure DO!
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    moved to our government and military nursing forum see the wisdom here.
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    Quote from CJEgglestonLPN
    Hello All!
    Ive been seriously considering joining the military as well esp. since I can not find a JOB. But I already have a family...I went in and spoke with the Army Recruiter he was nice and helpful...he told me to take my time and think about it...that was 6 months ago n Im still undecided. I dont wanna b away from my kids long periods of time and he told me that being in the actual army was better that army reserved. Im really just wanting stability. I do not have a degree but I do have my practical nursing license and eventually will be returning to school for my BSN...so what Im asking is basically the same except I dont do water so Navy is out and Im 29 so the Airforce is out as well...which would be best Army Reserve, National Guard or the full blown Army? Thanx for any insight in advance!!
    Joining the military because it is hard to find a job, wanting stability, and not wanting to be separated from your kids for long period of times are all bad reasons to join the military.

    The military is going to suck if you are just wanting a job. The demands are way to high for that.
    Stability is the last thing your going to have the majority of the time in the military. You will have unpredictable work hours, frequent moves, frequent changes in your kids schools etc.
    Deployments in active duty Army tend to be 12+ months and that doesn't include the 2-3 months training ahead of time where you are away from your family. Even the AF and Navy deployments are 6+ months.
  8. 0
    Quote from wtbcrna
    Joining the military because it is hard to find a job, wanting stability, and not wanting to be separated from your kids for long period of times are all bad reasons to join the military.

    The military is going to suck if you are just wanting a job. The demands are way to high for that.
    Stability is the last thing your going to have the majority of the time in the military. You will have unpredictable work hours, frequent moves, frequent changes in your kids schools etc.
    Deployments in active duty Army tend to be 12+ months and that doesn't include the 2-3 months training ahead of time where you are away from your family. Even the AF and Navy deployments are 6+ months.


    Thank You for your insight and perspective! But maybe I didnt clarify myself...i started entertaining the idea back in August '10 before I even finished nursing school my husband and I had already discussed it and by the time i went in and spoke to the recruiter in December '10 we were all prepared for the if, and's, buts, and maybe's of military family life, I didnt recieve my actual license until March of this year I didnt start looking for nursing employment until I rec'd my license...so i was considering the military long before i got my license or couldn't find a job, Ive just been thinking about it more since my jobhunt has gotten me nowhere so far...in my comment I just didnt wanna give a whole life story so I condensed it. True enough I dont wanna be away from my family but as my husband said to me sometimes we have to make sacrifices for the betterment of ourselves. I felt that the military would give me direction and yes stability not as far as staying in one place but as far as within myself. I know how military life can be on families I didnt plan on stayin for 30 years or so if it wasn't healthy on my family and myself. I planned on giving it the initial first run of whatever the obligation they require then once it was over if it was worth it signing back up of giving it up...so thank you guys for the advice and insight its still a serious decision and Im still weighing all my options
  9. 3
    I can't tell you what it is like to be an Army Nurse Corp Officer but I am married to one.
    My husband Chris has been in the Army Nurse Corp and Commissioned as an Officer in 1999.
    Prior to that time he was enlisted in Armor as a Tanker, enlisting at the tender age of 17 in 1987.
    He left Active Duty and went National Guard to obtain his BSN. Upon completion of his BSN he re-joined Active Duty. He has always been Active Duty during the time I have known him. We met in 2000, right after he returned to full time service and we married in 2001. Our 10 year Anniversary is coming up this September.
    During our 10 years together, we have lived in 4 states and he has deployed 3 times. Iraq, Afghanistan, and currently he is in Iraq again. The "good" think about Army Nurse Corp is that you are generally Profis'd and since new regulations were passed a few years ago, the vast majority of Profis deployments are 6 months (boots in sand time - gone about 7 months total as you need pre/post deployment briefings/trainings and travel time).
    His first deployment of our marriage was two back to back deployments and he was gone for a total of 13 months. I was 4 months pregnant with our son Noah when he left for Iraq. He was in Iraq 5 months, came home after the baby was born for 10 days R&R, went back to Iraq only to "Jump" to Afghanistan for 6 months for a back to back deployment. He left this time in February and was supposed to be home in September although there is an excellent chance he will be home in early August. The only good thing about deployments is a bit of extra income and the homecoming. The homecoming is usually pretty great. (Think "honeymoon") He has been on a Forward Surgical Team twice and is the OIC of the ICU and ICW at a CSH this deployment. He said living conditions are much better at the CSH then on the FST because he has his own CHU with a personal shower and internet access. He works ALOT of hours during this deployment and he works ALOT of hours when he is stateside. I will say though, that my husband goes above and beyond his senior officers expectations and doesn't quit until he feels the job is done. Fortunately we instant message almost every day, occasionally going a few days between interaction (which I abhore) and we usually video chat (skype) about twice a week.
    PROS
    1. He makes great money with Base Pay and BAH, BAS, etc - after 11 years in Active Duty as a Major and with his current deployment reducing his taxes, I think it would be rude to say how much he makes on the forum, but it is double what I make as a civilian RN.
    2. We have lived in some nice places. Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio was a great post. We live in Georgia now, in the Augusta region as he is stationed at Fort Gordon, and I like it here also. We also lived at Fort Knox (which is where he was stationed when we met as KY is the home state for both of us) and he did 2 years of recruiting duty in Kansas City (which had some definite positives) and he did 2 years at Fort Leavenworth as the OIC of on post clinic.
    3. He looks HOT in his uniform. (That's something I like...lol)
    4. The retirement benefits will hopefully be worth his last 20+ years of service.
    5. You won't deploy if you are pregnant and immediately post partum. In fact, my husband was slotted for this deployment in place of a mother who had her baby a year ago. Although, I have seen women deploy with a baby under a year of age.
    6. Most of your deployments will be 6 months and when you are gone you will likely have regular contact with your family and you will be "Safe" for the most part. Very, very, VERY few nurses are ever KIA. (Maybe 1 in the past 50+ years)
    7. You will get management responsibilities and training you might never get in the civilian sector and see/do things you would never have the opportunity to do without having been in the service.
    8. Your time in service looks great on a resume.
    9. Student loan repayment.
    10. As a single woman, you will work with alot of very attractive, very polite, very educated men.
    NEGS
    1. Deployments stink no matter how short or long you're gone.
    2. Being far from family is sometimes hard for me to deal with. I don't go "home" when my husband deploys. I feel it's more important for the kids to stay in one place and have stability plus I can't quit jobs at the drop of a hat but it's damn hard to have no support system.
    3. This is not an easy life.
    4. You will work alot of hours as your responsibilities increase. Initially though, you will work about 3 12 hour shifts a week in most instances, although as an OR Nurse you might do 5 8's.
    5. This lifestyle is not easy on families. The spouse and children must be or become very independent whether they want to or not.
    I'm sure there are more than this but I am too tired to think straight.
    I don't think any area of the military is better or worse than another. It is what it is.
    Good luck in your decision making process.
    RN318, coconutzz, and Pixie.RN like this.
  10. 0
    As a active nurse in the Army I would agree for the most part with DelannaRN's post. The one big thing the military does make you do is take responsibility for your life and not rely on others to do it for you. I have worked as a civilian nurse for over 10 years before going on active duty so I have seen both sides. In the civilian world you can skate along & not take responsibilty for career and rely on others or grow in leadership for your whole career. In the Army they make you do both. As you become more senior you will take on more of a leadership role & if you do not take charge of your career they will eat you up & spit you out. This would make your time in the military miserable.


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