Yikes! Another bad observation at an LTC facility - page 3

YIKES!!!!! That's about the only word I can express about this one. Got off a weekend night shift (through my agency) at a nursing home I have never been to previously. I prefer to stick to... Read More

  1. by   renerian
    Thanks summer! I do consider myself lucky. Looking for a job is such a pain though.

    renerian
  2. by   BadBird
    I would also consider notifying the family and telling them that I would testify in court for them, that should shut the administrators up. Good luck
  3. by   Youda
    BadBird, bad idea. Although I sympathize completely with the sentiment, this is a violation of patient confidentiality which can get you in trouble with your BON. Only the patient has the authority to approve the release of any medical information, even to his/her own family. Also, the BON frowns on a nurse who contacts a family about things like this when he/she is not "on the clock" and the patient-nurse relationship no longer exists. Check with your BON. This is really uneithical and shouldn't be done, no matter how tempting it is!
  4. by   Catsrule16
    Eddy,

    Ever think of sending your night from heck to the Medicare Fraud Unit? It's a shame facilities like that get our hard earned dollars when they don't provide the care.
  5. by   eddy
    BadBird --- While I have mixed feelings on this particular family (assuming there is such) finding out, I wouldn't ever be the one to tell them. Depending on their situation sometimes discovering things like this is worse than being ignorant to them. It's not my place, nor my right. I have chosen to go through this process in the most ethical and legal way possible. I would never get a job in this state again if I did such a thing. Plus, others in nursing would always wonder if I would cross that line again, and next time it might be them I'm reporting... not my idea of an enjoyable career to look forward to. Not to mention I would likely lose my license for telling them, and yet it really wouldn't do anyone any good. I did my part, which is to notify people who ARE in a position to break the news (should they elect to). In addition this information is available upon request by the family. They just have to ask. Hopefully they do. Facilities are required by law to turn over such information. However, they are not required to let you know they have it.

    Catsrule16 --- Actually they (Medicare) are already involved.
  6. by   BrianWhitfield
    We found out about my mother's death due to abuse and neglect through the local TV stations. A nurse at the facility turned in an "anonymous" tip to the state health department. The state health department came in for a surprise investigation and called in the state attorney general's office for a criminal investigation. The local TV stations found out that the state health department was doing an investigation and contacted me. Until then, the story the nursing home administrator and ombudsmen gave me was that she "died in her sleep". They still don't know for sure who the nurse was who reported the event.
  7. by   RNConnieF
    As I posted in a previous thread, you should see what $7000.00 a month plus medications can buy; a private suite with bedroom, bathroom, sitting area, and a kitchenette with fridge and microwave, daily housekeeping, 24/7 CNA assistance with ADL's, and 24/7 professional nursing care including medication administration. Should lack of funds subject our parents to the environment reported here? The acceptable minimum standard of care for our seniors is disgraceful. We should be ashamed at the way we care for our elderly.
  8. by   cargal
    RNConnieF stated:
    "The acceptable minimum standard of care for our seniors is disgraceful. We should be ashamed at the way we care for our elderly."
    I agree totally. When did DON's stop being nurses and become suits? When they can't see past potential definciencies and census while staring at one of their resident's sitting in the cold hall without their sweater, glasses and yelling with NO ONE validating them- toget the paperwork done- it is disgraceful.

    Blessings,
  9. by   Youda
    This is totally gross. But, as usual, my curiosity gets the better of me. I started to wonder just how long that poor man had gone without care. This is what I learned:

    Infestation by maggots is called myiasis. Myiasis generally occurs in conditions of filth. The majority of infestations are caused by flies laying eggs in a decomposing or decaying flesh. One species of fly will lay eggs in "organic" material without decomposition of the tissue. Flies begin to lay their eggs in/on around 10-minutes after death and the life cycle of flies is often used in forensic medicine to help determine time of death.

    The life cycle of the fly takes around 6-20 days depending on the species. So to answer my question, how long did this man go without care? Consider that he first had to lay long enough for an open decub to form, the decub to become infected with enough exudate to attrack a fly, and then another 1-2 days for the eggs to hatch into maggots.

    I figure he layed there without any care, bathing, or help for around 3-7 days.
  10. by   renerian
    shivers........

    renerian
  11. by   casperbjs
    What an interesting web site to check out nursing homes!
    Eddy, way to go for reporting this nursing facility, (it sure isn't a "home"!) They deserve everything that they get!
  12. by   Youda
    Originally posted by casperbjs
    What an interesting web site to check out nursing homes!
    Eddy, way to go for reporting this nursing facility, (it sure isn't a "home"!) They deserve everything that they get!

    . . . and more. This, IMHO, is criminal neglect. No one will be charged, and no one will spend one minute in jail (which is where they belong!)
  13. by   Catsrule16
    This, IMHO, is criminal neglect. No one will be charged, and no one will spend one minute in jail (which is where they belong!)
    Administrator and DON of a facility in Tennessee were arrested and charged with wreckless homicide for lack of care that caused a death. Where I work, the vulnerable adult act would come into play in this situation.

    While I have mixed feelings on this particular family (assuming there is such) finding out, I wouldn't ever be the one to tell them.
    Thank goodness you didn't. A co-worker has to testify in front of the SBON the results of a complaint investigation that resulted in a disgruntal former employee violating a resident's right to confidentiality. (The resident was alert and oriented.)

    As a state surveyor, and having investigated a few complaints, I can assure you if we find something that warrants referal to the attorney general, medicare/medicaid fraud unit, the nurse aide registry, state board of nursing, and what ever other licensing boards we feel need to be notified of such actions we do it.

    There are a few administrators out there who are upset with us for citing F225 for hiring someone with a criminal background for criminal domestic violence. One tried to say the person was just defending themself. I understand but what happens when that person is defending themself against an alzhiemer's resident who doesn't understand what is going on?

    Eddy, just out of curiosity, did you get a chance to document in the chart what you found? Do you keep a journal of things that happen on your assignments? Did you know personal journals are admisable in court of law and formal hearings? When I use to work on the provider side and staffing was bad, I would copy the staffing sheet and the 24 hour report sheet as well as making an entry in my journal.

    I admire your guts to report this facility to the powers that be. Keep up the good work.

    And for all those out there, God Bless you for all your hard work and dilligence to protect our vulnerable elderly.

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