What can we do to improve working conditions in Nursing homes? - page 6

NOTHIING......until the exact ratio of CNA's and licensed nurses to residents are mandated in the State and Federal Regulations.... Read More

  1. by   babedalton
    Dont give up ! The squeaky wheel gets the grease ! The Public needs to get behind you, rally the families, residents etc; Get Legal help from College of Nurses on plan of action to achieve this.
  2. by   shoreh2000
    hello guys

    i am an ex-surveyor (la county) and don. there is help for all of us.

    1. staff need to be more proactive and be more informed regarding the regulation so they can make better decisions.

    2. prioritize your work.

    3. talk to your colleagues. communication is the basic component to good care.

    4. ask questions. and, hold your don/administrators liable for making any bad decisions!

    good luck

  3. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from shoreh2000
    hello guys

    i am an ex-surveyor (la county) and don. there is help for all of us.

    1. staff need to be more proactive and be more informed regarding the regulation so they can make better decisions.

    2. prioritize your work.

    3. talk to your colleagues. communication is the basic component to good care.

    4. ask questions. and, hold your don/administrators liable for making any bad decisions!

    good luck
    excellent advice, i am doing just that, holding the don/administrator/ ltc facility liable for firing me after i reported an illegal/unethical practice to the state ,after first complaining about this in house.luckily my state has a whistleblower retaliation protection law for healthcare workers, i am in the middle of a lawsuit against the facility.hopefully the state will step up to the plate also and start enforcing some of those excellent laws.have you read "patients pain and politics", written by mary richards rollins rn bsn, about the wi state surveyors and what they had to go up against in their own department as far as adequatly investigating and then enforcing?it was an eye opener.very sad.
  4. by   CapeCodMermaid
    [QUOTE=Boston64;2016734]Hi! This was the first question I saw and I felt furious and sad because I am a seasoned RN and I want to teach CNA's, but because I do not have a BSN, I have found it a fruitless search.

    With the high rate of baby boomer's reaching the age where they will need care, the demand for well trained CNA's as well as RN's is going to reach a crisis!

    I have decided, at the ripe old age of 64 to enrole in a BSN program so that I can pass on the gift of an excellent training that I was given 42 years ago. I may be too old to work at the bedside, but I still have a lot to offer.

    There are so many of us well trained nurses out there who could be of use for teaching purposes, if the requirements for teaching were not so great.

    Anybody else out there who thinks and feels the same way?


    Boston64-
    I live in Massachusetts and there is NO regulation I know of which makes it mandatory for a CNA instructor to have a BSN. My SDC is in the middle of a CNA class and she does not have a BSN. Where I live, there are so few nurses with Masters Degrees to teach at the local community college, the BON has decided to allow BSN nurses teach nursing students if there is an MSN person willing to 'supervise' them.

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