R.E.S.P.E.C.T.

  1. 2 Where's Aretha Franklin when you need her?
    I had a CNA in my office today...not her first time being counseled. She wouldn't stop talking to listen to me, she raised her voice and kept getting louder and louder. She called me a liar(!) and when I was in the middle of saying something to her, she got up and started walking out of the room. I said, "I'm still talking. Your behavior is disrespectful and rude." She opened my office door. She had been so loud, a group of nurses was gathered outside my door. She spun around, stuck her finger in my face and yelled, "You're not my mother. You can't yell at me." I put my hand up and said, " We're done for now." She screamed "I'm done!" and walked out.
    What is wrong with people?!? You did something wrong and instead of admitting it, you scream at your boss?
    Is this Generation X or the Millenia Generation? Didn't their parents teach them anything about how to behave?
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  3. Visit  CapeCodMermaid profile page

    About CapeCodMermaid, RN

    CapeCodMermaid has '30+' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Gerontology,med surg,home health'. From 'It's not on any chart....'; Joined Nov '02; Posts: 5,531; Likes: 8,008.

    19 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  serenidad2004 profile page
    2
    I just watched a special on this the other night on I believe it was 60 Minutes. It talked about how the group that is fast replacing the "baby boomers" are those born from 1980 on.
    It said that the way these people were raised/treated in school is affecting job behavior. Something about how parents coddled them and everyone was given a trophy just for showing up. That has created a generation of employees and future employees that are unable to take constructive criticism and play a victim role a lot.
    It was quite interesting, as I was born in '83 and wasnt raised or taught that way but I can certainly see it in some of the techs and nurses i work with.
    Katie13LPN and nrsang97 like this.
  5. Visit  CapeCodMermaid profile page
    2
    MY kids were born in 85 and 87 and you can bet they were not raised to act like that.
    nursel56 and ricksy like this.
  6. Visit  TBlase profile page
    2
    One side argues it is the spoiled offspring called the Y generation. Another side claims it is a symptom of the ever increasing single parent families, many women only, and in economic distress. In my lifetime of LTC, it's my view that a majority of CNAs come from less thaat privileged backgrounds, even abuseive, and in many cases are also treated badly by the nursing staff, to add to the maelstrom.It's a touchy situation, for sure. Where to draw the line in the sand? What to ignore, what to address? How to insert empathy into a situation when you are dealing witth basically helpless populations in a nursing home? Hmm.
    ricksy and Hygiene Queen like this.
  7. Visit  Cora_Ann profile page
    2
    Quote from TBlase
    One side argues it is the spoiled offspring called the Y generation. Another side claims it is a symptom of the ever increasing single parent families, many women only, and in economic distress. In my lifetime of LTC, it's my view that a majority of CNAs come from less thaat privileged backgrounds, even abuseive, and in many cases are also treated badly by the nursing staff, to add to the maelstrom.It's a touchy situation, for sure. Where to draw the line in the sand? What to ignore, what to address? How to insert empathy into a situation when you are dealing witth basically helpless populations in a nursing home? Hmm.
    I am a CNA I can definitely say I am in the minority when it comes to my up bringing and over all goals. I am CNA because (and this may sound bad) I make a fairly comfortable living doing so, and while it is certainly not in anyway an easy job it has provided me with benefits and I have been able to pay off debt and loans. I am possibly considering LVN school, while I am still not sure, I don't plan on being a CNA forever.
    I think what attracts a lot of people is it takes no time to be certified. I always look to the RN's and LVN's with respect. I have found if you listen and communicate things will work out. I have a great relationship with most of the RN's. Most of them were in my shoes at one point and are very encouraging.
    It makes me so mad how CNA's (especially in my age group, early twenties) do nothing but whine and complain. My advice would be quit or get over it and try to work with everyone.
    LTCNS and nrsang97 like this.
  8. Visit  fairyluv profile page
    0
    my husband and I were discussing this the other day. there is no work ethic among people or even coorporations anymore, there used to be a time. oh say about 20-25yrs ago where employers/supervisors actually went out and talked with there employees about problems and situations and how best to solve them, they used to actually have a respectful employee/supervisor relationship, you earned merit raises based on your job performance and if you didn't live up to par, you didn't get a raise and your employer had a policy regarding job description and work improvement programs. They had an open door policy and actually encouraged it and wanted employee suggestions on how to make there business/facility more effecient and profitable, not just for the corporation but the employees as well, a place where the employees would be happy and actually enjoy going to work. You don't find that to often anymore. Now it's all about demanding and unrealistic expectations, and with todays generations it's all about the entitlement mentality. it seems like everyone feels that they are entitled to everything without having to work for it. Employers demand it and employees resent it. there is no work ethic or camaradie between people anymore. Maybe it does have to do with the poor economy and maybe it has to do with the entitlement mentality. Either way. It creates a problem for both employer and employee, But the disrespect, I don't think that has changed much, although I had never yelled at a boss, I did stand up for myself and from my experience that was really quite frowned upon. I can take criticism well if it is presented to me in away that is respectful, I would rather have my super tell me in a polite, respectful way, this is what you did wrong, this is the best way to correct that, i feel that alot of it is in the approach and alot of it to is in how the person take it to.
  9. Visit  savoytruffle profile page
    2
    I believe it is more a socio-economic problem rather than a generational one. I was born in '79. I really think of myself as a younger generation employee (I'm 34! But most of my peers are my parents age) my friends and I hold steady respectable jobs. We are well educated and ambitious. I know for a fact that my direct bosses feel that i am very young. I have been called "girl, kiddo, and baby" by them. (Joking about my 35th birthday and someone saying - oh but you're such a baby!) that makes me feel like they don't take me seriously. What I know for sure about my age peers- we like feedback. I like direct honest communication. When I give that to my aides, some respond well, others take it to heart and cry. (Who would have thought crying at work would be a common thing!!) I feel your frustration. I would not say its generational though. When I hear that I think "there goes my mom again...." Not all of us are whiny self important entitled brats.
    LadyFree28 and SoldierNurse22 like this.
  10. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    2
    Quote from savoytruffle
    I believe it is more a socio-economic problem rather than a generational one. I was born in '79. I really think of myself as a younger generation employee (I'm 34! But most of my peers are my parents age) my friends and I hold steady respectable jobs. We are well educated and ambitious. I know for a fact that my direct bosses feel that i am very young. I have been called "girl, kiddo, and baby" by them. (Joking about my 35th birthday and someone saying - oh but you're such a baby!) that makes me feel like they don't take me seriously. What I know for sure about my age peers- we like feedback. I like direct honest communication. When I give that to my aides, some respond well, others take it to heart and cry. (Who would have thought crying at work would be a common thing!!) I feel your frustration. I would not say its generational though. When I hear that I think "there goes my mom again...." Not all of us are whiny self important entitled brats.
    ^THIS...

    I was born in 81. I was not raised to be entitled; in fact, I was raised to invest in myself; taught to understand that I will have to work for everything I want, and do it well. I have an ethic of investment; if I don't have it in me to do it well, I will not do it, or find something else to do.

    If anything, millennials are inquisitive, and collaborative, stuck to be confident in self-identity and all of that; not a fan of "this is how it is always done" blanket statement. When that is challenged (especially when the "this is how it's done" is NOT effective), then the ASSUMPTION is made about "entitlement", instead of a well, thought out, valid point in making things better. It may not come out the best way, but, in the best context, the future has solutions, not necessarily selfishness...and this goes for all generations as well.

    I recall a situation that I had to stand up for myself (and my license) that was frowned upon, yet, I have always maintained a professional relationship with my superiors; and even after this one incident, I still was considered a strong leader in my position and for my job. My position in that incident was not chalked for me to being "entitled"; I felt strongly about ethical behavior, and I drew a line in the sand. I had to do that; I had to be an advocate, and will continue to advocate.

    I think it is more socioeconomic/socioemotional than generational. Another poster brought up the pressures of many CNAs who are taxing their bodies, all the while have taxing issues at home. Some do feel trapped in that position, and see no way out, especially if they are in a precarious situation in their personal life. And although it is a reason, it's still not right to project their frustrations to leadership in such a negative manner. It's emotionally unstable.

    I am sure the OP will deal with this appropriately.
    SoldierNurse22 and fairyluv like this.
  11. Visit  Debilpn23 profile page
    0
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    MY kids were born in 85 and 87 and you can bet they were not raised to act like that.
    My kids were born in 1981 and 1984 and certainly weren't raised that way
  12. Visit  ktwlpn profile page
    0
    I've been in the DON's office more then once with cna's like that-I don't put up with that crap, I pursue progressive discipline per our policy. One staff member like that can ruin the morale of an entire unit and have a negative impact on patient care. That kind of person will also speak that way directly to or in ear shot of a visiting family member and towards a resident. I've learned that when the issues get me as far as the DON's office I can just sit there with my mouth shut because this type of person just picks up that shovel lying on the floor and starts digging their own grave. Once the DON witnesses the behavior their days are numbered at our facility. She needs to be gone.
    I believe it's more of a cultural and socio economic thing. If you have been raised by someone who believes they have always gotten the short end and the world owes them something I guess you inherit that large chip to carry on your shoulder. Many employers don't stress customer service to their staff-anything goes .One of my son's first employers actually gave him a handbook and followed up with a quiz .It really covered basic manners-he couldn't believe what he was reading but after a few years of working he has seen all types of behaviors among co-workers.
  13. Visit  Blackcat99 profile page
    1
    Some of the CNA's at my LTC are unbelievable. Some are very rude to everyone-both patients and staff. They try to do as little as possible and have no clue about taking any kind of pride in their work. They have no work ethics period. They are just plain lazy and self-centered. If you try to give them a little "constructive criticism" they become verbally abusive. Then of course the nurse is blamed if the CNA's are not doing their work. How do you change people who simply don't care about their residents? I certainly don't have the time to babysit them.
    fairyluv likes this.
  14. Visit  TBlase profile page
    0
    The hostility towards CNAs in this post would be shocking, if it weren't so typical in real life.

    There are two types of nurses in LTC. The first, the holier than thou, I'm the nurse and you're my minion, has never worked a day as an aide, never answers lights, would never dream of helping an aide transfer a patient or god forbid toilet a patient, never includes the 'minions' in reports or decision making or even asks for their opinions (if you think you know the patient better than the CNA, as an example, you fall into this category), or even looks at them in the eye on a daily basis. The second, the supportive, 'glad I don't have THEIR job job because I couldn't HANDLE it for a day', thankful, appreciative, and helpful types that actively asks the direct care giving staff for opinions, advice, includes them in the day to day conversation, assists them because you want to make BOTH of their jobs easier, and realizes that without them? YOU would not have a job.

    That said, even the OP didn't post a nasty, broad rant against nursing assistans in general. The OP was flustered by an employee that appeared to have been sent from another planet, one that she could not get a point across to. Other than that, in fact, the OP is always level headed, and sounds like a bang=up DON.

    Is it easier to replace a nurse in LTC, or is it easier to replace a 'top notch' CNA? We old timers know the answer to that. If not for CNAs, nursing homes would not exist. There's your answer.
  15. Visit  ktwlpn profile page
    4
    What about the Third type of nurse in LTC-the one who worked as an aide for years,knows how difficult it is and still expects it to be done right? I CAN do the job,matter of fact I can still knock out a complete assignment on my unit before many of the cna's could. I don't have their job because I WORKED my way through school just as any of them could choose to do .And if no cna's show up who do you think will do the job? Right,the nurses. I am not a fool-I know the cna's spend way more time at the resident's side then I do and I look for their input,I seek out their opinions and when one informs me that a resident "just doesn't look right" I promptly go and assess that resident-and they are almost always right.I also answer call bells,toilet residents,shower residents etc..Time after time I'm still at the desk watching the aides leave at the end of the shift.I can do their job but they can't do mine.
    fairyluv, Nascar nurse, Blackcat99, and 1 other like this.


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