New Grad RN in LTC, what can I do?

  1. 0
    I will be graduating early 2011, and I want to work in LTC, but I only see ads for LPNs. If you are an RN in LTC how did you get your job? I mean did they advertise for it, did you just apply, or did they place in in a spot for an LPN or what?

    Also, are you on the floor, or are you management of some type, ect?

    How would you recommend I do my jobs search?


    Thanks in advance.
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  3. 25 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    I never found a job in the paper. I've always went out and applied in person with my resume in hand. Always went in ahead of time to get the application so I could take it home and type it up nice and neat. Of course now with the Internet things are different and hopefully someone else has suggestions for that.

    Pick a bunch of places, get the applications (many places have their applications online to download), fill them out and then take them in with your resume which of course includes a cover letter and request an interview for said job. Chances are you won't get an interview date right there but at least they will have your info.

    Don't underestimate the power of a good resume. I hired a professional resume writer for my first resume and it was money well spent. Of course you have to find the right resume writer or it can be better written by yourself. Remeber; buzzwords/resume.

    Sounds like you're raring to go. Take the boards and then go!..........good luck
    FocusRN likes this.
  5. 1
    I'm a new grad RN, and I have been in a LTC facility for 4 months now. I got the job by giving my resume to one of the weekend nurses, and she placed it under DON's door. The DON gave me a call as soon as she got it on Monday morning. I think I did a good job typing up my resume and stuff. I was offered a job on the spot at my place of work as I dressed nicely, made a good impression, and brought along my portfolio from nursing school. I think most facilities don't care whether they get a a RN or LPN to do the same job. The most important factor is that they are good at what they do. However, LTC facilities will always need RN's working the floor as there are several tasks that LPN's can't do such as hanging IV abt from a PICC, and initial assesments etc.
    FocusRN likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from Gerry1888RN
    I'm a new grad RN, and I have been in a LTC facility for 4 months now. I got the job by giving my resume to one of the weekend nurses, and she placed it under DON's door. The DON gave me a call as soon as she got it on Monday morning. I think I did a good job typing up my resume and stuff. I was offered a job on the spot at my place of work as I dressed nicely, made a good impression, and brought along my portfolio from nursing school. I think most facilities don't care whether they get a a RN or LPN to do the same job. The most important factor is that they are good at what they do. However, LTC facilities will always need RN's working the floor as there are several tasks that LPN's can't do such as hanging IV abt from a PICC, and initial assesments etc.
    Is there a difference in your pay from the LPNs? Because what I am thinking is why would they hire me, if the already have maybe 3 RNs on staff, and they can get an LPN to do most other things, cheaper. I guess what I am wondering is, if they don't have any open RN positions, but are looking for LPNs, and I apply, will they try to offer me the job at an LPN rate.

    It really has me discouraged because I keep seeing LTCs that are hiring for LPNs on RN Supervisors with experience.

    I'm try to think of ways to make myself more marketable. I know back when I was working as a CNA, I worked weekends only (and got paid more for it), because no one wanted weekends. If the same applies for RNs do you think that I will be able to find a position like that?

    Thanks for your input.
  7. 0
    LTC facilities, if considered skilled, have to have an RN in the building at least 8 hours a day. Ofcourse it is cheaper to hire LPNs to cover the rest and to maintain costs many facilities do this. Nevertheless, most LTC facilities have a high burn out in RNs and so just keep looking, something will open up.
  8. 1
    Where I am any nursing facility must have an RN on the floor 24/7.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  9. 1
    Wow. Not where I live. That's great!
    tyvin likes this.
  10. 4
    We don't allow our applications to leave the building. You have to fill it out and hand it in so we know YOU did it.
    Please don't go flaming me, but if I have the choice between an LPN and an RN, I'll hire the RN. The 5 Star Rating System is important these days and part of that score is based on staffing..specifically the number of RNs in the building.
    In Massachusetts LPNs can and do hang IVs--peripheral, midlines, and PICCs.
    Here's what I look for when interviewing:
    1.Is the applicant on time? I am very busy and don't have time to waste wondering why you didn't show up.
    2. Is the applicant neatly dressed? Not designer clothes but clean and pressed...you'd be surprised how many people come in looking like they just rolled out of bed.
    3. Are their finger nails clean? No kidding...dirty nails or long fake nails...ick
    4. A firm handshake? not one of those fishy ones
    5.Is their resume free of spelling and grammatical mistakes? We all make typos, but if the person didn't take the time to carefully read their own resume', how careful will they be with documentation?
    6.When I take them through the building, do they say hi to other staff people and residents? I had one woman flinch when one of the residents came by.
    7. Do they ask questions about the position or the facility? I know people are anxious and willing to work almost anywhere but you should have at least a clue about what kind of facility it is.
    8. Do they job hop?
    9. If they're a new grad, what kind of other experience do they have they can bring to the job?
    Of course, it's not an exact science. I've been doing this for years and years and have developed a sense about people...and I know if they will fit in with the staff I already have.
    Good luck and don't get too discouraged. Finding a job, especially these days, takes time...sometimes it's a case of being in the right place at the right time.
    VegetasGRL03RN, IowaKaren, tyvin, and 1 other like this.
  11. 0
    I'm an RN at LTC. I work on the skilled hall, which is staffed with one RN and one LPN on all shifts.

    The ICF halls are only staffed with LPNs, the reasoning being if they need an RN for something on those halls there is one in the building they can "borrow"

    I wasn't a new grad when I hired in, though; I worked in the hospital setting first. I'm not sure hiring in as a new grad is a good idea, at least at my facility. It's much more autonomous than in the hospital, where I had doctors right at my disposal and all the supplies and equipment I needed. (We joke that LTC nurses can start an IV with a hollowed out pen, since we run out of angiocaths all the time, lol) Good knowledge base and assessment skills are critical, especially on a skilled hall where a lot of my patients actually belong back in the hospital, IMO.

    I found out about the job through word of mouth.
  12. 0
    I have been an RN in several LTC facilities and the majority of them I simply applied. There was not a job posted or advertised. I agree with all of Cape Cod's suggestions. Very good information. I think in NE it is about 50/50 with the ratio of RN/LPN


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