Mother of Sorrows: Rachel's Story - page 2

One night I admitted an 89 YO female patient who was one of our "frequent flyers" due to chronic anemia, as well as a host of other medical problems. She came in every few weeks or so for GI bleeds... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    What a lovely story. Reminds me of my dear grandmother- She will be 93 in May. She broke her hip last year and suffers from inclusion body myelocitis (sp), a neuro muscular disease. She had her second radical mastectomy four years ago. She has survived seven bouts with cancer. Many of the doctors who have repeatedly told (throughout her life) that she was terminal and had only weeks to live, are now dead, themselves. She lost her husband of 62 years several years ago. She is the only person still living from her original family. She married during the depression. Together, she and my grandfather saved the family farm from forclosure.

    Whenever she has been hospitalized, she never rings the call light- "Those girls are so busy, I don't want to bother them."

    She recently moved to a private adult care home. She is now four states away, and I may never see her again.
    I am going to call her in the morning.
    Last edit by Hellllllo Nurse on Apr 26, '04
  2. by   nursemary9
    mjlrn,

    Thank you for sharing this beautiful story.You wrote it so well. I was extremely moved by it.

    As so many have all ready said, this is exactly why I prefer to work with the
    elderly, both in the hospital and in the home. I have always learned so much from the elderly.

    Thank you again
    Mary Ann
  3. by   scrubs70
    Thankyou mjlrn, it was very touching and certainly made me realise that all I go through everyday just seems so insignificant compared to our elderly and there sufferings.
    Shook me back into reality, Thankyou. Time to be thankful for the good things we have
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    Thank you one and all. I'm happy to share it with you, as it was just too neat of an experience not to do so.......we see so many patients in the course of our careers, and only a handful ever make a real impression. Rachel is one of those. I hope she's doing better.........I've had the past four days off, and I'd like to think she got better and went home. I'll find out tomorrow, at any rate.
  5. by   pj_marie
    I too just wanted to thank you for this incredible story you have so eloquently shared. It is just what I needed to read. Very uplifting if I do say so myself! I have spent the last 2 days wrestling with the words of some of my co-workers about how "I spend too much time with the residents" or "how I am spoiling them and making the other CNAs jobs harder because of it". That sort of thing.... it is hard for me not to treat them with the respcet they so much deserve, even the ones who don't realize all they have to do is push the little red button one time, "yes dear, you can let go of it after that... I will still come." I manage to get everything done I am supossed to get done and still spend just a few extra minutes with these people, what is so wrong with that?? How am I spoiling them, because I try hard to get to know them or something about their lives? Think of all they have been through, and then they end up not being able to do much of anything, even what we consider simple things... especially their choices! That is a big pet peeve of mine, not even giving them a choice, just to walk in and say you are going to do this or that now, no question, no choice, no nothing. And my co-workers say I am too nice, just make them do it. OK, I understand some residents/patients have no clue about anything, let alone whether they need to pee or sleep but, that doesn't mean I can't let them know what is going on, I just can't work like that. I am one of the few that actually talk to and inform that one unresponsive/comatose individual of what I am doing, and why... Is this really wrong? I surely hope not. I honestly felt like this being a CNA was a calling, not a choice.... I view my job as more than a job, if I am the one person that can make them smile or feel better, than that is all that matters to me. I am the one that will answer a light on the next wing if that's what it takes to help someone. For that is what I am here for, to help people. After all, they are still people... they haven't lost that just because they don't/can't function like they used to. Twice in the last month I have heard the last words of 2 people and I took it extremely hard. I get very attached to my residents if you couldn't tell... lol. Both times I was commended on the quality of care I give and the love I show yet, I still hear negative things about how I am making things difficult for others on my days off. This thread just re-affirms why I got into this field to begin with.Again, thank you so much.
    PJ
    Last edit by pj_marie on May 2, '04
  6. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from pj_marie
    I too just wanted to thank you for this incredible story you have so eloquently shared. It is just what I needed to read. Very uplifting if I do say so myself! I have spent the last 2 days wrestling with the words of some of my co-workers about how "I spend too much time with the residents" or "how I am spoiling them and making the other CNAs jobs harder because of it". That sort of thing.... it is hard for me not to treat them with the respcet they so much deserve, even the ones who don't realize all they have to do is push the little red button one time, "yes dear, you can let go of it after that... I will still come." I manage to get everything done I am supossed to get done and still spend just a few extra minutes with these people, what is so wrong with that?? How am I spoiling them, because I try hard to get to know them or something about their lives? Think of all they have been through, and then they end up not being able to do much of anything, even what we consider simple things... especially their choices! That is a big pet peeve of mine, not even giving them a choice, just to walk in and say you are going to do this or that now, no question, no choice, no nothing. And my co-workers say I am too nice, just make them do it. OK, I understand some residents/patients have no clue about anything, let alone whether they need to pee or sleep but, that doesn't mean I can't let them know what is going on, I just can't work like that. I am one of the few that actually talk to and inform that one unresponsive/comatose individual of what I am doing, and why... Is this really wrong? I surely hope not. I honestly felt like this being a CNA was a calling, not a choice.... I view my job as more than a job, if I am the one person that can make them smile or feel better, than that is all that matters to me. I am the one that will answer a light on the next wing if that's what it takes to help someone. For that is what I am here for, to help people. After all, they are still people... they haven't lost that just because they don't/can't function like they used to. Twice in the last month I have heard the last words of 2 people and I took it extremely hard. I get very attached to my residents if you couldn't tell... lol. Both times I was commended on the quality of care I give and the love I show yet, I still hear negative things about how I am making things difficult for others on my days off. This thread just re-affirms why I got into this field to begin with.Again, thank you so much.
    PJ
    even though you get discouraged, don't ever lower your standards of care.
    continue to believe in your aspirations and hold your ground. many pts. depend on it.
  7. by   VivaLasViejas
    What a wonderful attitude you have, PJ.......I wish there were more people out there like you caring for our elderly. Maybe someday you'll help to change the way long-term care is managed in this time-is-money culture we live in these days.
  8. by   zudy
    Thank you so much for sharing, mjlrn. As I have said before, it's these things that keep me in nursing. I have had so many pts that have been so courageous, so brave, that it is truely an honor and a privaledge to have cared for them. They are my heroes.
  9. by   CIRQL8
    Beautiful. Thank You.

close