Lowest of the Low - page 5

Hi all, Hoping for some insight, support, advice. I have now been working LTC for 9 weeks. I am a new grad, had two weeks of training, and been on the floor on my own since then, hired as a charge... Read More

  1. by   olderthandirt
    Have you wondered why they sent you to be charge nurse? Maybe because they can't find anyone to cover that floor and needed to put a raw nurse there. Cripes, what a position to be in. On one hand, you can tell them what they want to hear so you can keep the job but drive yourself nuts second guessing yourself. You could ask for a different position. Whatever you decide to do, bide your time until a better job opens. Private Duty pays very well and you could go through an agency.
  2. by   Verna127
    I think it is fairly common in long term care to give a brand new nurse about 1 week or less orientation and then leave them in charge of up to 40 residents. It can take several months to feel completely comfortable with your new position. Until then ask your co workers for help and advice when you need it. such as how to prioritise The CNAs will try to test a new nurse, let them know what behavior you will not tolerate. I would look for another job. Maybe some of your former classmates can recomend a place that will offer you more support. Good luck and it does get better as you gain more experience. Sometimes it is a good idea when you are new to not air too much frustrations at work as it is difficult to know right away who to trust with yor opinions.
  3. by   goinforitlpn
    I am sorry to tell you this, but you need to hear it. If you have not already done so, quit this "job" which is not a career step for you. I will brielfly give you some reasons why I think this way. As an outsider looking in, & with 28 yrs experience, let me give you my take on this one.
    First and foremost, RUN! RUN! RUN! from this supervisor, DON & this facility! Honey, do not question yourself. Do not begin to doubt your knowledge & the good nurse you know you are simply because a foolish, misguided, unprofessiional, supervisor & DON can't handle their positions. Leave this "job" immediately. Find another to start your "career."
    That DON obviously does not know how to handle her position if she is hiring "green" nurses to do charge. It takes experienced seasoned nurses to do charge of a LTC floor. In no way is that a slight against a new grad. I was there too. But that is the reality of LTC.
    If any DON, or supervisor does not want you after your probationary period is over becuase they do not believe in your professional skills, but they are willing to let you work out the entire probation period well, then, it is they who should be questioned. If they do not think you are not good enough for the residents after the probation is over, how can you possibly be good enough for the residents now? Why don't they just cut you loose now? I will tell you why. Because they can't. Because they are short staffed right? Don't let them play with you like that.
    So, you see, the problem does not rest on your shoulders. It begins and ends with the superiors who hired you for the wrong position. They set you up to fail. They needed to fill a hole and they did with the first warm body.
    According to your entry they gave you little to none oreintation, which should have been quite extensive considering the position you were taking over, and how green you are. So, don't go beating yourself up just yet. Leave some of your strength for those who deserve it. Don't allow any unprofessional supervisor or DON that you do not respect to feel you are not a good nurse. Shame on them not you!
  4. by   shadow2
    I agree you should look for a new job, I have worked in LTC and it is getting worse not better, most places I see now, you have 40 patients and usually just two CNA's. I remember working one holiday in a LTC skilled unit, had 45 patients, lost alot of weight that day, from having my butt chewed off by all the unhappy family members. And I was only the agency nurse there for that day and had never been there before. Find another job you will not regret it and it might help you feel better about nursing in general.
  5. by   banditrn
    Quote from shadow2
    I agree you should look for a new job, I have worked in LTC and it is getting worse not better, most places I see now, you have 40 patients and usually just two CNA's. I remember working one holiday in a LTC skilled unit, had 45 patients, lost alot of weight that day, from having my butt chewed off by all the unhappy family members. And I was only the agency nurse there for that day and had never been there before. Find another job you will not regret it and it might help you feel better about nursing in general.
    Yes, I agree that things are getting worse. Just as the acuity in hospital patients is getting higher, so is it with some care centers.
  6. by   NaomieRN
    Run away from this place. Give them the two-week notice and find another job! Life is too short to be stressed............there are better jobs out there.
    It is not worth the stress and the agravation and worst of all your licence.

    Wave them goodbye
  7. by   softstorms
    I am so sorry that you had this experience. You have found out first hand how some facilities work. They put you in the situation because they need someone there and did not take care of you. I get very angry when this happens, but you will find it happens a lot. The problem is not with you, but with them. As nurses we used to have mentors who were assigned to new grad's that followed them even after orientation. They were avaliable to you to ask questions to and be avaliable for insights and feedback. I don't think this is a good situation for you and you may need to move on and find another job. During your interview you need to ask about your responsibilities and ask if you will have a shift supervisor avaliable to you if you have questions. You seem like a good nurse and just need some time to grow and learn. Don't let this first experience get you down.
  8. by   lvs2nrs3535
    THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH FOR YOUR SUPPORT
    Every single person who replied gave me something to think about, and most of all,the emotional support I needed.
    UPDATE........After my written goals to succeed was given to the DON and my nurse manager, I was told they were very impressed. I have also made an effort to live by my words. I cannot learn it all in such a short time, but I can and will maintain my calm in the midst of chaos. I am also covering the weekend Baylor shift for 5 weeks, (the Baylor nurse is on military duty), and I cannot believe the difference on the weekend shift. First of all I have a wonderful experienced nurse, (she is Filipino, reminds me so much of my mother-in-law), friendly, and soooo calm and capable.) It is such a different atmosphere, it is like working in a completely different place. My last two weeks of probation period are up next week, if I am not hired full-time, well, SoBeIT. I know in my heart that I have given it my all. I have discussed this with my DON, and she has said to me that she is very impressed with my "change of attitude". I did let her know that MY attitude has not changed, she simply saw me on a very bad day, when Iwas overwhelmed and close to crying. In other words, the calm capable one is the real me, but jeez, we all have bad days, huh? I also let her know how shocked I was at her attitude that she was ready to give up on me without even getting to know the real me, and/or my accomplishments. She acknowledged that she had probably seen me at my worst, and basically stated that she has changed her position on keeping me. Despite the initial instinct to cut and run, I think I am going to continue with my position. The CNA's present a challenge that is going to probably be there in any facility I work with, correct? So it is up to me as the charge nurse to find my balance, and not let them knock me off my stride. It remains to be seen if my choice to stay is the right one. I do feel so much more confident, and i have three more weeks of working the weekend shift and learning from my co-worker. After that, if I must go back to the weekday chaos, (this is still up in the air, if the nurse with the baylor position is called to active duty, the baylor position is mine), but if I must go back to weekday chaos, then I will do so with more confidence in myself. It also helps that every day I am learning skills that will stay with me a lifetime.
    Again, thanks so much for your support, emotionally I would have felt so alone without all your input. I have been actively recruiting friends of mine from nursing school to take advantage of this wonderful tool.
    Thank you Thank You ALL!
    KristyBRN
    Quote from bethin
    Do they expect you to ignore every help? Even those who constantly cry wolf may at some time need real help. You cannot ignore that. A coworker once made the mistake of ignoring an elderly man who had a habit of yelling "help" and then one day he yelled "help" and she ignored him. Turns out he did need help as he had slipped out of his wheelchair and had broken a hip.

    You are a new grad and they should be more considerate. Two weeks orientation does not sound like much. I'm an aide and I rec'd a month of orientation.

    IMHO, you should quit. From your post, it sounds like it isn't going to get any better. Management sounds like it has an attitude problem. Is the turnover rate high? I would quit before I was accused of something I didn't commit. Good luck.
  9. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from KristyBRN
    THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH FOR YOUR SUPPORT
    Every single person who replied gave me something to think about, and most of all,the emotional support I needed.
    UPDATE........After my written goals to succeed was given to the DON and my nurse manager, I was told they were very impressed. I have also made an effort to live by my words. I cannot learn it all in such a short time, but I can and will maintain my calm in the midst of chaos. I am also covering the weekend Baylor shift for 5 weeks, (the Baylor nurse is on military duty), and I cannot believe the difference on the weekend shift. First of all I have a wonderful experienced nurse, (she is Filipino, reminds me so much of my mother-in-law), friendly, and soooo calm and capable.) It is such a different atmosphere, it is like working in a completely different place. My last two weeks of probation period are up next week, if I am not hired full-time, well, SoBeIT. I know in my heart that I have given it my all. I have discussed this with my DON, and she has said to me that she is very impressed with my "change of attitude". I did let her know that MY attitude has not changed, she simply saw me on a very bad day, when Iwas overwhelmed and close to crying. In other words, the calm capable one is the real me, but jeez, we all have bad days, huh? I also let her know how shocked I was at her attitude that she was ready to give up on me without even getting to know the real me, and/or my accomplishments. She acknowledged that she had probably seen me at my worst, and basically stated that she has changed her position on keeping me. Despite the initial instinct to cut and run, I think I am going to continue with my position. The CNA's present a challenge that is going to probably be there in any facility I work with, correct? So it is up to me as the charge nurse to find my balance, and not let them knock me off my stride. It remains to be seen if my choice to stay is the right one. I do feel so much more confident, and i have three more weeks of working the weekend shift and learning from my co-worker. After that, if I must go back to the weekday chaos, (this is still up in the air, if the nurse with the baylor position is called to active duty, the baylor position is mine), but if I must go back to weekday chaos, then I will do so with more confidence in myself. It also helps that every day I am learning skills that will stay with me a lifetime.
    Again, thanks so much for your support, emotionally I would have felt so alone without all your input. I have been actively recruiting friends of mine from nursing school to take advantage of this wonderful tool.
    Thank you Thank You ALL!
    KristyBRN

    An epithany!! You realize your talents!! And, that witch as able to better appreciate you!! I suspect that they thought of their error and had to cover their rear ends! Hooray for you!!!
  10. by   lvs2nrs3535
    Dear DDooDopDuo,
    You are so right about not not airing my frustrations nor trusting anyone with personal information. It was a hard lesson, but well learned, and i will Never make that mistake again.At this point I will trust no-one with my opinions, just stick to medical facts. This lesson I will carry with me forever.;
    Thanks again.

    Quote from DDooWopDuo
    I think it is fairly common in long term care to give a brand new nurse about 1 week or less orientation and then leave them in charge of up to 40 residents. It can take several months to feel completely comfortable with your new position. Until then ask your co workers for help and advice when you need it. such as how to prioritise The CNAs will try to test a new nurse, let them know what behavior you will not tolerate. I would look for another job. Maybe some of your former classmates can recomend a place that will offer you more support. Good luck and it does get better as you gain more experience. Sometimes it is a good idea when you are new to not air too much frustrations at work as it is difficult to know right away who to trust with yor opinions.
  11. by   lvs2nrs3535
    Just one last comment, to all who told me to leave and now, I suspect you may be right, but (perhaps it is my pride), I am going to do my best. And if I do leave because it is not getting better,Iwill be able towalk away with my head held high, and not to be a total sap, (cuz I am starting to sound like one), but the support I have found here will be a huge part of that. I think I may be able to succeed here, and in a years time I will be better able to make the choice of where I want to focus my career. My wise mother always told me that every person you meet has something you need to learn, every situation (especially the really tough ones) is presented to you in order to test you, and allow you to learn and do the best you can. You know, the old lemons, lemonade thing? So at the risk of sounding like a kiss ~!!,
    Thanks again everybody!
    KristyBRN
    Never let them see you sweat! (never again, at least, LOL)
  12. by   BaByMaMa
    I'm sorry for what you're going through. I've only been out of school for a little over a year myself and couldn't imagine being able to go through your situation right now. I hope everything works out whether you decide to leave or not. Just remember that your worth and dignity can only be stood up for by you alone in this profession. Stand up for yourself and demand respect as a human being and a nurse. The fact that you are a new nurse doesn't mean that others can get away with humiliating you. I hope you feel better! Keep us posted!
  13. by   RN Randy
    Hi Kristy,
    Just reading the thread here and thought I'd chime in...
    It caught my attention because several LTC's in my local area came shopping for Charge and Manager nurses in our school just before graduation.
    I believe they actually gleaned a few of us too.
    The thing is, and the thing everyone seems to be 'leaning towards' but not saying outright is this...
    You aren't stupid.
    You aren't doing anything wrong.
    The problem is that you're simply not qualified to fill the position you've taken.
    Please don't take offense to that statement, as I mean none.
    The fault isn't yours, it is the facility's, or those that chose to hire you.
    As a fellow new grad in an ICU, I know how you feel. There's a lot to learn.
    However; you should really do some critical thinking about your situation.
    Consider that currently you're a college grad with a nursing degree, and/or license, and that's pretty much it. You did not learn to be a nurse in school.

    Possibly the best thing right now is to consider that you would be better off to become a nurse before you try to tackle being a nurse manager.

    It isn't a 'hang in there' situation. It's more like a 'do yourself [and anyone relying on your care/leadership position] a favor' situation... so that you don't find yourself either on the receiving end of an attorney, or crying in the hallway as they wheel the body out. Sure, It wasn't your fault, but you're in charge and should have known. [re: sign here, P/P manual read. sign here, trained and checked off, sign here, you give us the right to....]
    Justice is blind my dear, and your wonderful facility or buddies in the system will serve you up with duck sauce when the fire's hot.
    I would hope your license means more to you than does jumping line to a charge position.

    Finally, I have to say, if one of my parents were in a LTC and I heard this story, I would carry them out on my back if I had to, just to get them out of that place. And again, it isn't about your drive to succeed and hang in there, it's about qualifications, experience, and ability, so please don't take offense.

    Please do think about that though.... what would *you* do if you heard a 9week old nurse was now in charge at your loved ones facility?

    Just some food for thought.
    Good luck in whatever you pursue.
    rb

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