is this abuse - page 2

i am working in ltc facility resident was complaining sob no signs or symptoms was noted by charge nurse.she stated to resident that if you was having sob you would not be able to run your mouth... Read More

  1. by   txspadequeenRN
    there is nothing harsh about it!!!! telling a patient that since she is running her mouth 90 miles a hour she could not be having sob is verbal abuse... it is also a violation of her dignity especially if she did it in front of people. we don't know if the situation was addressed or not with an assessment but it is neglectful on the part of the nurse who didn't take the c/o seriously. even if the patient was confused the nurse could have responded more professionally and done simple things like a pulse ox ,vitals or listening to lung sounds..this could have put the patient at ease...i try and take every c/o seriously because you just never know....:spin:











    Quote from augigi
    man, you guys are harsh! the more of this type of post i read, the more nervous i am about working as a nurse in us facilities. as someone who 's frequently accused of being less than diplomatic, i must have said a version of this comment a hundred times while working in a nursing home.

    in that type of facility, you know your patients. if you're an rn, you know how to assess respiratory impairment. who knows what tone of voice was used? who knows if she was kidding around with someone she knows?

    i can't even believe on that little information, people are prepared to call "abuse" or "neglect" and run to the board to report this woman!

    sheesh.
  2. by   augigi
    Yes, but you're hearing very little information about the situation here - I'd want to know more before reporting "abuse" or "neglect". Maybe the patient had already been assessed and those signs recorded. Maybe she was panicking and getting SOB - it happens ALL the time.

    Why are US nurses so prepared to report their peers - as a first intervention - rather than talk to them and find out why they did what they did? (I am obviously not talking about actual clear instances of abuse/neglect, in which case you have a duty of care to your patient).
  3. by   Jo Dirt
    It depends on the situation. People are too quick with the lynch mob mentality here.
  4. by   nurse10000
    Abuse? That sounds like southern comfort compared to here.
    I guess it all depends on where you work.

    Nurse10000
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 30, '06 : Reason: remove weblink
  5. by   txspadequeenRN
    I never said the nurse should be reported...It does not matter if an assessment was done already or not the patient does not deserve to be talked to that way...


    Quote from augigi
    Yes, but you're hearing very little information about the situation here - I'd want to know more before reporting "abuse" or "neglect". Maybe the patient had already been assessed and those signs recorded. Maybe she was panicking and getting SOB - it happens ALL the time.

    Why are US nurses so prepared to report their peers - as a first intervention - rather than talk to them and find out why they did what they did? (I am obviously not talking about actual clear instances of abuse/neglect, in which case you have a duty of care to your patient).
  6. by   nurse10000
    I understand you feeling that the situation may have gotten a little rough.
    But reporting it as abuse should be saved for the unmanagable situations.
    If you get a reputation as being too sensitive, when something big really does happen, they won't respond and maybe not even care.

    Just food for thought.

    nurse10000
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 30, '06 : Reason: remove weblink
  7. by   nurse10000
    I just wouldn't report it. I'd be too concerned that later my nurse supervisor wouldn't take me serious if I reported too many smaller incidents.

    It may be uncomfortable, but not major. Use your discretion.

    nurse10000
    Last edit by sirI on Nov 30, '06 : Reason: remove weblink
  8. by   Elektra6
    I have this resident's twin! She often complains she can't breathe while screaming on her bed. I found if I pulse ox her (sometimes it IS low) and reassure her she will calm down. I've tried 02, but she's noncompliant and made herself a DNH after one too many hospitalizations last year. It's sad and HORRIFYING to the other residents and their families to have someone screaming they can't breathe, so I try to calm her down ASAP.
  9. by   emotional_she
    Although I am not a nurse yet, I do have an opinion on this subject. Sometimes people forget that they are working with someones mother, or father, or grandparent. They aren't a person to them, they are a room number. I am certainly not saying this about ALL places or nurses at all, just about the area I live in. I wish we had more nurses around here like the one on this board.....Anyway, I don't think she should lose her job but if I was that pts daughter.....I would want to punch her right in the mouth for speaking to my family member that way. JMHO
  10. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from emotional_she
    Although I am not a nurse yet, I do have an opinion on this subject. Sometimes people forget that they are working with someones mother, or father, or grandparent. They aren't a person to them, they are a room number. I am certainly not saying this about ALL places or nurses at all, just about the area I live in. I wish we had more nurses around here like the one on this board.....Anyway, I don't think she should lose her job but if I was that pts daughter.....I would want to punch her right in the mouth for speaking to my family member that way. JMHO
    You need to work in the trenches before you can truly have an opinion on this.
    And remember, the nurses in the nursing homes are doing what most families don't want to do.
  11. by   banditrn
    I wonder if she was talking in jest? I kid with some of my residents, depending on who they are, and they love it.

    Not in the nursing home, but in the hospital, I've told patients to stop talking and take deep breaths when they were having breathing difficulties - but not in a mean way.

    I try to always go in a room with a smile on my face, especially if it's someone I don't especially care for, and ask them how their day (or night) is going. I see no point in making bad situations worse, by greeting people with a bad or rude attitude.
  12. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    You need to work in the trenches before you can truly have an opinion on this.
    And remember, the nurses in the nursing homes are doing what most families don't want to do.
    AMEN!
  13. by   SuesquatchRN
    I have found, of all of my patients, that COPDers tend to be the most self-centered and demanding. We have one guy who will not comply with orders for bed rest, is constantly be checking his sats and heart rate, and falls asleep in his scooter using up the canister. Two weeks ago he awakens, realizes the O2 supply is out, and literally knocked me the he.. over with his scooter in his haste to get a new one. Even afterwards, when he was all hooked up again, it didn't occur to him to apologize for injuring me. Now, I understand that being unable to breathe has to be frightening as all get out. But if the resident referred to by the OP is anything like this guy it isn't any wonder.

    We have another obese diabetic non-compliant COPDer who, while we were trying to get O2 onto her dying roommate, started whining and YELLING that she needed her Ultram and then complaining that we unplugged her radio to attach the roommate's O2 up. every time WE DID SOMETHING FOR THE ROOMMATE her needs would become urgent and she'd try to get us to drop the other's care to attend to her.

    I have spoken harshly to both of these people. They may deserve respect, but so does everyone else in the facility.

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