Introduction- New to this forum

  1. [font=franklin gothic medium]hi everyone ,

    [font=franklin gothic medium]i am new to this ltc/geriatric nursing forum, although i have been around the site for a couple weeks now.

    [font=franklin gothic medium]i recently decided to take a job as a unit manager in ltc. i started on monday orienting with the nurse that is leaving the position. this is my first unit management position or mgt. position, period. most of my experience is in the hospital, but i did work per diem at this facility a little over a year ago at least 1-2 12 hr. shifts per week as a medication/charge nurse. amazingly, most of the patients are still there! i have to learn a lot about mds and pris. i guess i will feel my way through the more difficult aspects of the job. if you have any advice, please pass it my way!

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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   nursing36
    [quote=nursesrmofun][font=franklin gothic medium]hi everyone ,
    i am a nurse in ltc i am the nurse unit manager for an alzheimers ward locked unit i took over about 3 months ago, it seem the paperwork is unreal everytime state comes they add more, just go with the flow i try to prioritize my work and i do alout of praying, i love it though. if i do get my paperwork done i try to get out on the floor. the cnas are truly great it seems you have to weed out the ones that dont really need to be there.
  4. by   jkaee
    Quote from nursesrmofun
    [font=franklin gothic medium]hi everyone ,

    [font=franklin gothic medium]i am new to this ltc/geriatric nursing forum, although i have been around the site for a couple weeks now.

    [font=franklin gothic medium]i recently decided to take a job as a unit manager in ltc. i started on monday orienting with the nurse that is leaving the position. this is my first unit management position or mgt. position, period. most of my experience is in the hospital, but i did work per diem at this facility a little over a year ago at least 1-2 12 hr. shifts per week as a medication/charge nurse. amazingly, most of the patients are still there! i have to learn a lot about mds and pris. i guess i will feel my way through the more difficult aspects of the job. if you have any advice, please pass it my way!

    when i worked full time, i worked as a unit manager and rnac. my advice to you is to be visible to your staff, when things are hectic help out, and try to be on the floor as much as you can without compromising your own work. this will help you to really get to know your residents, which you will need to know when the state sweeps through. regarding "managerial" skills, i feel this is the most difficult part of the job. be respectful, but right from the start show them that you mean business, don't give in about things that you feel need to change, and discipline when it's necessary. i worked in a tough unit that had very tough staff....and it nearly got the better of me. you are not there to be anyone's friend, although you can be friendly with everyone. like i said, this is the tricky part....but admin will be looking to you to make sure your unit is run smoothly and properly. i used to have unit meetings with all the staff a couple times a month so that they could bring up concerns, or we could brainstorm on how to fix problems.....you won't always be liked, and you will be talked about, and you may get attitude sometimes, but if you stand your ground they will at least respect you.....
    i just realized that i made it sound horrible.....it's not! just start out strong, be there for your staff, and always remember that the residents care comes first. hopefully, you have good nurses and cna's that will help you along the way.

    good luck and keep us posted!


    p.s. all that mds stuff is very confusing and difficult to grasp sometimes, but with time you will understand it all. there are lots of reference books that your facility should have (or be able to order) that will help you with this. if you have any specific questions, feel free to pm me!
  5. by   NursesRmofun
    [quote=nursing36]
    Quote from nursesrmofun
    [font=franklin gothic medium]hi everyone ,
    i am a nurse in ltc i am the nurse unit manager for an alzheimers ward locked unit i took over about 3 months ago, it seem the paperwork is unreal everytime state comes they add more, just go with the flow i try to prioritize my work and i do alout of praying, i love it though. if i do get my paperwork done i try to get out on the floor. the cnas are truly great it seems you have to weed out the ones that dont really need to be there.
    thank you for your thoughts! the paperwork is fairly heavy, and the person teaching me the position is very good at it. i should be ready to go with most of it, but i need mds and pri classes in the future, i am told. i already see the challenges of the staff management side. i will be tested and i will have a few waterloos, i'm sure! but i am optimistic.
  6. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from jkaee
    when i worked full time, i worked as a unit manager and rnac. my advice to you is to be visible to your staff, when things are hectic help out, and try to be on the floor as much as you can without compromising your own work. this will help you to really get to know your residents, which you will need to know when the state sweeps through. regarding "managerial" skills, i feel this is the most difficult part of the job. be respectful, but right from the start show them that you mean business, don't give in about things that you feel need to change, and discipline when it's necessary. i worked in a tough unit that had very tough staff....and it nearly got the better of me. you are not there to be anyone's friend, although you can be friendly with everyone. like i said, this is the tricky part....but admin will be looking to you to make sure your unit is run smoothly and properly. i used to have unit meetings with all the staff a couple times a month so that they could bring up concerns, or we could brainstorm on how to fix problems.....you won't always be liked, and you will be talked about, and you may get attitude sometimes, but if you stand your ground they will at least respect you.....
    i just realized that i made it sound horrible.....it's not! just start out strong, be there for your staff, and always remember that the residents care comes first. hopefully, you have good nurses and cna's that will help you along the way.

    good luck and keep us posted!


    p.s. all that mds stuff is very confusing and difficult to grasp sometimes, but with time you will understand it all. there are lots of reference books that your facility should have (or be able to order) that will help you with this. if you have any specific questions, feel free to pm me!
    [font=franklin gothic medium]thank you very much! i think you hit the nail on the head on all of what you said. i had a challenge already cause the acting manager left early. i could see a little attitude from one nurse who i perceive as thinking because i am a little confused because i am new, that she is going to peg me as being ditzy. so, i have to be strong and get myself together and face them as a leader. also, i witnessed the aftermath because the acting manager (who is very strong) acted on a concern of mine...that the 3-11 cna staffers were not doing much of anything between 3 & 4. it was a like a break straight out of the box. so, the acting manager said something to one 3-11 aide friday. after the acting manager left early, this aide began to vent and, at first, i thought she was talking about me, but then she said the acting manager had disrespected her, and she was crying many tears. i tried to calm her and tell her it was not personal but she just needed to do her job. i told her that i didn't think the manager was commenting on her entire work performance, just the things she was seeing at the time. <sigh> this is in no way an easy job...trying to get things done right. but i am up for the challenge and will keep you all up to date! thanks again!

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