Homophobia

  1. What has been your experience with homophobia in your practice? How do you deal with it?
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   red leaf
    Unfortunately, I work in a smaller LTC facility and have heard homophobic remarks directed at coworkers before. It can be difficult to confront a coworker because news gets around. It may be a good idea to speak with your nursing manager or whoever is above you about a general policy of non-discrimination in the workplace.
  4. by   CapeCodMermaid
    There is no place for any kind of phobia in health care. I've worked in many places in many towns and guess what....there are always gay people no matter where you go. So what --who cares?
  5. by   caliotter3
    I once worked in a facility with an openly gay individual. Unfortunately, he made his presence unpleasant by his constant sexual harassment of coworkers. I never figured out why he did this. It wasn't necessary, people were willing to accept him if he acted nice.
  6. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Sexual harassment is against the law no matter who is doing it. I've worked with straight nurses and gay nurses (and a few who orientation was too hard to figure out). No matter who it was, I didn't want to hear about what they did and who they did it to.
  7. by   CoffeeRTC
    Do you mean by the residents?

    I've encountered it and also racisism. In my experience there is no changing a 70.80.90 yro olds ways. I just tell them it isn't appropriate this day and age to make those types of comments.
  8. by   westieluv
    I, too, have worked with gay nurses who make their sexual orientation a huge deal and make others around them uncomfortable by constantly discussing it, making lewd comments about physicians, patients' family members, etc. I never understood why they had to act that way. I don't care if someone is gay or straight, that is their issue and their life, but why beat a dead horse and go on and on about it? I never walk around pointing out to anyone who will listen that I am straight and that I find Dr. XYZ physically attractive. Maybe some of the homophobia stems from this kind of behavior?
  9. by   RNBearColumbus
    Ok, here goes.

    As a gay man, I've worked n LTC for quite a while and never really encountered any homophobia from either co-workers or residents / family members.

    With patients and family members, I keep the interaction professional and refrain from discussing my personal life outside of work. This would be the case no matter what my orientation was, and is good advice for anyone, homo or hetero.

    With co-workers, I don't hide the fact that I'm a gay man. I don't change pronouns when discussing my significant other, and I don't lie about other aspects of my life to save the sensibilities of co-workers.

    A couple of people here have mentioned that they don't see why gay people need to talk about their personal lives, or make others uncomfortable by "constantly discussing it" This attitude in itself is homophobic. (It's like saying, "I don't have a problem with gay people, as long as they don't talk about it" ) Let's put that shoe on the other foot shall we?

    Every time you (as a straight person) discuss your family, talk about your wedding plans, show off pictures of your children, talk about how "Dreamy" that actor is on Grey's Anatomy, show off a wedding ring, talk about your weekend plans with your spouse, etc etc etc, you are engaging in the same behavior. Suppose I said, "I don't have a problem with straights as long as i don't have to hear about their lives"

    If hearing about your gay co-workers families and spouses, or hearing a gay co-worker say that they find someone of the same gender attractive upsets you, then quite frankly, the problem is YOUR'S not your co-workers.
  10. by   Nascar nurse
    Quote from LPNBearColumbus
    Ok, here goes.

    As a gay man, I've worked n LTC for quite a while and never really encountered any homophobia from either co-workers or residents / family members.

    With patients and family members, I keep the interaction professional and refrain from discussing my personal life outside of work. This would be the case no matter what my orientation was, and is good advice for anyone, homo or hetero.

    With co-workers, I don't hide the fact that I'm a gay man. I don't change pronouns when discussing my significant other, and I don't lie about other aspects of my life to save the sensibilities of co-workers.

    A couple of people here have mentioned that they don't see why gay people need to talk about their personal lives, or make others uncomfortable by "constantly discussing it" This attitude in itself is homophobic. (It's like saying, "I don't have a problem with gay people, as long as they don't talk about it" ) Let's put that shoe on the other foot shall we?

    Every time you (as a straight person) discuss your family, talk about your wedding plans, show off pictures of your children, talk about how "Dreamy" that actor is on Grey's Anatomy, show off a wedding ring, talk about your weekend plans with your spouse, etc etc etc, you are engaging in the same behavior. Suppose I said, "I don't have a problem with straights as long as i don't have to hear about their lives"

    If hearing about your gay co-workers families and spouses, or hearing a gay co-worker say that they find someone of the same gender attractive upsets you, then quite frankly, the problem is YOUR'S not your co-workers.
    There is a huge difference between everyday chit chat about everyday life & flaunting things just for the shock value of it. Think... "My husband & I went away for the weekend and had a great time" versus "My husband & I went away for the weekend and here are all the nasty details of our sex life while away". I have seen both kinds. It's not attractive behavior from anyone, homo or hetero.
  11. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Two stories both true.
    Yes, people can change. My grandmother hated black people. She had been mugged 3 times by black men in the subway and she just hated them all. She went to a nursing home....called me one day and said, "I was wrong. They're not all bad. There are a few Negro girls here and they are very nice." Okay so she got over being a bigot but she couldn't stop calling them Negros.
    I worked in a lovely skilled facility...very conservative by any standard. One of the nurses there and I became very good friends. Long story short, we were both getting married and picked the same day for our weddings. One of the little old ladies heard we were getting married. She called me into her room and said, "I hear you and Maxine (not her real name) are getting married. Well, dear, I think it's wonderful your employer is so liberal and doesn't mind if two of the nurses marry each other."!! Before I could say anything, she continued by saying we didn't look like lesbians and now that she had met us, her opinion of 'those people' had changed. I almost didn't have the heart to tell her we weren't marrying each other.
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    Two stories both true.
    Yes, people can change. My grandmother hated black people. She had been mugged 3 times by black men in the subway and she just hated them all. She went to a nursing home....called me one day and said, "I was wrong. They're not all bad. There are a few Negro girls here and they are very nice." Okay so she got over being a bigot but she couldn't stop calling them Negros.
    I worked in a lovely skilled facility...very conservative by any standard. One of the nurses there and I became very good friends. Long story short, we were both getting married and picked the same day for our weddings. One of the little old ladies heard we were getting married. She called me into her room and said, "I hear you and Maxine (not her real name) are getting married. Well, dear, I think it's wonderful your employer is so liberal and doesn't mind if two of the nurses marry each other."!! Before I could say anything, she continued by saying we didn't look like lesbians and now that she had met us, her opinion of 'those people' had changed. I almost didn't have the heart to tell her we weren't marrying each other.


    Here, they still say colored. But it is, for them, polite, just as Negro was far more enlightened than the oft-used nasty term.

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