Hip/knee Fracture patients.. which way do you turn them?

  1. 0
    Hello all,

    I was recently floated to a rehab unit, for our patients with hip fractures and knee replacement, post surgery do you turn them on the affected side or unaffected side when they need the bedpan? I had learned it as turn on affected side to avoid dislocation but today a resident told me she was told she should be turned on unaffected side by another nurse. Which is the proper way and what is the rationale? I am on nights so I do not get to speak to the rehab team. Thanks for your input!
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 5
    do you mean hip fractures post surgery? post ORIF or THR? I work on a surgical/orthopaedic ward in Ireland ( on nights )... hip replacements are never rolled onto the operated side! they are log- rolled with abduction pillow in place onto the un operated side to place bedpan, knee replacements are only rolled if they are too frail to lift up also on to the un operated side while one nurse supports the operated knee, if patient is able to lift up instead of being rolled then bedpan is placed from un operated side for infection control reasons.... hope this helps... I am new to this site and will be interested to read what other contributors have to say.... As I said I also work nights and don't see the physios but our physio therapists usually assess the patients pre and post - op and leave detailed notes in the multidisciplinary chart ( and much more legible than those of the medical team!!) with instructions re moving and handling and mobility...
    SitcomNurse, GaJordyLPN, LTCangel, and 2 others like this.
  4. 0
    Yes starstruck this does help! Now that I think of it I remember logrolling from nursing school! I didn't see any abduction pillows for the patient I will be sure to note it to dayshift. Ireland seems like a beautiful place. Welcome to all nurses from New York!
  5. 1
    I worked Orthopedics/Joint Replaement in the Hospital for 13 yrs and now am in LTC. Always roll to the UNaffected side for hips as the above poster said, preferrably with a pillow intact to keep the hip from crossing the body and possibly dislocating. For knees also, to the uaffected side and support the leg so that the knee does not roll. Hope this helps!
    GaJordyLPN likes this.
  6. 0
    Yes thanks for your reply! LTC angel, since you have tried both, how does hospital nursing compare to LTC? Is the grass always greener on the other side?
  7. 0
    You don't need an actual special pillow, you can you a regular pillow if need be. Why just note it to dayshift? I would find a pillow and start using it for logrolling tonight.
  8. 0
    Quote from newrnltc
    Hello all,I was recently floated to a rehab unit, for our patients with hip fractures and knee replacement, post surgery do you turn them on the affected side or unaffected side when they need the bedpan? I had learned it as turn on affected side to avoid dislocation but today a resident told me she was told she should be turned on unaffected side by another nurse. Which is the proper way and what is the rationale? I am on nights so I do not get to speak to the rehab team. Thanks for your input!
    @notflo. You sound like you would fit in perfectly on my unit. Looking for a job?
  9. 0
    I was taught to roll to the affected side in a hip repair, but a max of 15'. just enough to change linen, really. bed pans, this is when trapezes come in handy.


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