bed alarms

  1. could anyone tell me if you have been involved with any aspect of bed alarm usage...from their use to researchon their use. Thank you
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   Deby
    bed alarms are used widely in my facility. they have prevented many falls and have alerted staff appropriately. we have used screech alarms and rn plus alarms both in bed and in chairs. These alarms have even reminded the resident when sounded to sit back down and call for assistance.
  4. by   rob
    The facility I work at uses chair,bed, and wander guard alarms. We also have low beds which our wonderful. In order for these methods to be most effective is to inservice all staff including housekeeping,dietary,maintenance,office staff,and all nursing staff to respond to the sound of the alarms ASAP.
  5. by   Cindy Johnston
    Our facilty uses the Tab alarms, exclusively. They clip onto the resident's clothing and with the string attached to the clip a small piece of metal is magnetically in place in the Tab monitor, if the patient gets up or moves further than the string length , the metal/magnet connection is broken and the alarm sounds...seems to be quite effective, easy to use as well.
  6. by   susan brown
    Since going restraint free, we have used chair and bed alarms which are invaluable. The only problem that I see as a DON is that staff need to be reminded that they are somewhat a restraint if the staff who respond to the alarm simply tell the resident to "sit down" The whole purpose for the alams is to anticipate the resident's need so that he or she does not fall. Most times when an alarm goes off the resident wants something and is not able to communicate a need. Remember to toilet, offer a dring, nourishment change of position, walk, pain meds etc. We also use watch mates which we have found to be superior to wandergards. The doors automatically lock when a resident wearing one comes near the door, while other many pass through. The door also alarms if someone has it propped open and the numer of the watchmate bracelet is displayed so that stff know who to go looking for.
  7. by   vickir55
    Quote from Cindy Johnston
    Our facilty uses the Tab alarms, exclusively. They clip onto the resident's clothing and with the string attached to the clip a small piece of metal is magnetically in place in the Tab monitor, if the patient gets up or moves further than the string length , the metal/magnet connection is broken and the alarm sounds...seems to be quite effective, easy to use as well.
    Where can I order a tab alarm from?
    My dad has alzheimers and falls when he stands. I need something to let me know he is trying to get up.
    Thanks.
    Vicki
  8. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from vickir55
    Where can I order a tab alarm from?
    My dad has alzheimers and falls when he stands. I need something to let me know he is trying to get up.
    Thanks.
    Vicki
    http://www.padalarm.com/alertmate.htm
  9. by   UnewmeB4
    Quote from Cindy Johnston
    Our facilty uses the Tab alarms, exclusively. They clip onto the resident's clothing and with the string attached to the clip a small piece of metal is magnetically in place in the Tab monitor, if the patient gets up or moves further than the string length , the metal/magnet connection is broken and the alarm sounds...seems to be quite effective, easy to use as well.
    We use them as well. The only drawback is those DARN pts who unclip it from their gown to go to the BR...and tell you..."But, I was going to put it back on when I got back to bed!"
  10. by   FROGGYLEGS
    This may be a bit off topic, but once I had a resident whose chair alarm was attached incorrectly. The velcro on the holder was positioned around the string which prevented the pin from coming out when it was pulled on. The clip was secured near the collar area on the rear of the residents shirt. I came across the resident and he was standing up with the collar of his shirt holding him back and pulling at his neck. Basically it had the same effect as a chain and collar on a dog. Of course the alarm didn't sound because it couldn't. Thankfully the resident didn't fall or come into any other harm. This is just something I watch for now, but never thought of until it happened.

    In general I am glad we have the alarms. I have been alerted many, many times of residents trying to transfer unassisted by them and I am sure they have prevented many falls.
  11. by   CapeCodMermaid
    We use bed alarms, chair alarms, personal alarms(like TABS), motion detectors, alarmed self releasing seat belts....anything at all to help prevent falls and stay away from restraints. Last year at this time we had 19 restraints....yesterday at the restraint meeting, we were all thrilled to have gotten the number down to 5....3 of which are Merry Walkers and 1 is a seat belt on a youngish woman with CP who demands the seat belt. I like the talking chair alarms. "Sit down please"...works great with some residents.
  12. by   Tweety
    I work in a hospital. We use bed alarms they've reduced our falls and are very helpful as we are a restraint free unit.
  13. by   vickir55
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR THE WEB SITE. I ORDERED ONE THIS MORNING.
  14. by   not now
    Quote from UnewmeB4
    We use them as well. The only drawback is those DARN pts who unclip it from their gown to go to the BR...and tell you..."But, I was going to put it back on when I got back to bed!"
    I hate when they do that. Scares the heck outta me!

    I like the personal alarms they go from bed to wheelchair easily, are easy to hear and are easy to turn off (put the magnet back) when you get to the resident. The trick is getting there in time. I had one resident who didn't want to go to bed so he sat by the nurses station eating ice cream. I went down to the linen room to load my cart when I heard the alarm go off. There was my patient wobbling down the hall and I was running down the hall to catch him before he fell.

    I have a love/hate relationship with low beds. My facility uses low beds that have concave matresses making it hard to roll out of bed and even if they do they aren't going far. What I hate is the risk for back injuries when CNA's get a resident out of bed or when they log roll to change the geri-pad. The beds we have don't roll up.

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