Are most LTC understaffed? Are most nurses in LTC overworked, understaffed? - page 3

I am a recent grad and my first job was in a LTC facility..I have to say that the facility was understaffed..The nurse who worked there even told me that it is an understaffed facility..I know the... Read More

  1. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    Thanks..I quit my job today! I have had it with LTC and the rules and regulations and stupid administrators and the list goes on and on...but I appreciate your kind words.
    CapeCod, congratulations, I KNEW you were too good for that job.I truly wish you the best in whatever position you take after this one.
  2. by   Bala Shark
    I have a new job!

    Nurse to patio ratio in my new job: 2 nurses to 30 patients

    My old understaffed job: 2 nurses to 49 patients

    This could be the difference between night and day hopefully!
  3. by   banditrn
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    Thanks..I quit my job today! I have had it with LTC and the rules and regulations and stupid administrators and the list goes on and on...but I appreciate your kind words.
    Capecod!! So what are you planning to do?
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Bala Shark
    I have a new job!
    Congratulations!
  5. by   CapeCodMermaid
    Quote from banditrn
    Capecod!! So what are you planning to do?
    Until I decide what I want to be when I grow up I'm going to work for the VNA.
  6. by   kstec
    How do you find out what the legal nurse/patient ratio is? My facility has two nurses for 71 patients and 4-6 CNA's. 2 nurses on days and pm's and one on nights. That is just ridiculous. Since working in LTC as both a CNA and a nurse remind me that if I get old and society doesn't change the way they take care of their elderly, just shoot me. Most everyone in healthcare only want to take care of people, but as we are only one nurse with 40 patients how good is that quality of care? Let's put some of the people who call the shots in a nursing home for even one week and they will see that there is not enough staff to give quality care. Hopefully these big corporations that are making money off these nursing homes sleep well at night knowing there clients are getting less than desirable care because their to cheap to hire more help.
  7. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from kstec
    How do you find out what the legal nurse/patient ratio is? My facility has two nurses for 71 patients and 4-6 CNA's. 2 nurses on days and pm's and one on nights. That is just ridiculous. Since working in LTC as both a CNA and a nurse remind me that if I get old and society doesn't change the way they take care of their elderly, just shoot me. Most everyone in healthcare only want to take care of people, but as we are only one nurse with 40 patients how good is that quality of care? Let's put some of the people who call the shots in a nursing home for even one week and they will see that there is not enough staff to give quality care. Hopefully these big corporations that are making money off these nursing homes sleep well at night knowing there clients are getting less than desirable care because their to cheap to hire more help.
    Go online , look for the health department(in my state they are called Department of Health and Family Services), you will find either a phone number to call and ask this, OR you should be able to find it on line in the health department's Nursing Home Regulation section of the site.The nurse/patient ratios are shameful and unless we get state or federal mandates they WONT change.
  8. by   tigger2sassy1
    how about a census of 103? supposed to be 2 nurses and five to six cnas. if one nurse calls in there is only one nurse. the med pass keeps growing longer and longer, anything the other shifts don't want to do gets put on night shift. Got diabetics that crash during the night, people that demand pain meds all hours, accuchecks out the wazoo, huge treatments, not to mention that the mars and treatment books are monitored daily, you get written up for any blank spaces, and constant threats that you will end up in jail because of abuse and neglet and the beat goes on. Any suggestions for this???
  9. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from tigger2sassy1
    how about a census of 103? supposed to be 2 nurses and five to six cnas. if one nurse calls in there is only one nurse. the med pass keeps growing longer and longer, anything the other shifts don't want to do gets put on night shift. Got diabetics that crash during the night, people that demand pain meds all hours, accuchecks out the wazoo, huge treatments, not to mention that the mars and treatment books are monitored daily, you get written up for any blank spaces, and constant threats that you will end up in jail because of abuse and neglet and the beat goes on. Any suggestions for this???
    Only to report this to the Health Department( nursing home regulatory section), but I cant guarantee that this will get you anywhere.Contact your local nursing home reform groups, they might be able to hook you up with some legislative groups or office, ombudsman, they are OK , but have no enforcemnt power.But be aware if you do report your facility , and they know you did, you will be fired. Hopefully you have a Whistleblower Retaliation Protection Law in your state.LTC is a multibillion dollar industry with alot of lobbying clout, I dont know if anything will change until the babyboomers overwhelm the system and then all **** will break loose.
    Last edit by Simplepleasures on Jan 18, '07
  10. by   Midwest4me
    Quote from Tommybabe
    Yep, most LTCs are understaffed, at the nursing and aide levels. It's pathetic that there are around 17,000 nursing homes with over 1 million residents depending on them for care, but most of them are not getting the adequate amount of attention from nurses and CNAs because of the lack of staffing. Why aren't there federal, or at least state-mandated ratios for nursing homes? Do people, for example, really think that a CNA can take care of 20-30 residents on a 8-hour shift? I have a hard enough time with 12!
    Our state DOES have mandated staff-to-pt-ratios(regarding CNAs only---I don't think there is any mandate on # of pts per nurse) but alas those ratios do NOT consider the ACUITY of the pt. Unsure of the ratios have changed any(doubt that they have) from several years ago when I worked LTC but here they are for my state: day shift: 1 CNA for 10 pts; swing shift: 1 CNA to 15 pts; noc shift: 1 CNA to 25 pts. The CNAs really need better ratios than that and we nurses need a mandated ratio established!
  11. by   kstec
    I'm going to attempt to find out what the ratio is for nurse/pts. I actually was contacted by a LTC facility that told me that their nurse is responsible for 60 patients on days. Needless to say I didn't start there. My question is do more experienced nurses actually get all their meds passes, all their treatments done, charting, calls to doctors and of course the out of the scheduled routine of sending someone out to the hospital? I'm comparing to the nurses that I work with, they have 36-40 patients on day shift, with 3 CNA's. Do they really get it done or do they sign that they get it done? I hope one day that I too will be super nurse and be able to get all that done, but somewhere in all of that I would love to actually have some interaction with my patients other than "Good morning Mr or Mrs whoever, here are your meds" I've only worked LTC a very short time and consider myself very energetic and a fast learner, but I can't ever see doing all this work in a 8 hour day. So basically my concern is you get in trouble if you fudge your paperwork and you get in trouble if your honest and say you did not have time. So far I have just not been signing things if I didn't do it, but it wasn't because I'm lazy, it's because I have no time. And of course you get in trouble if you work overtime. How can you win? I don't think LTC is for me. Like I've said before if I get old shoot me before you put me in a nursing home, please!!!!
  12. by   kriss1976
    The LTC facility I work in is a 100 bed facility. There are two different ends and supposed to be 2 nurses, 2 CMA's and 5-6 CNA's on each end for days and pm's (except pm's don't have CMA's) with 1 nurse and 3 CNA's on each end on noc's. So there is supposed to be 2 nurses, 2 CMA's and 5-6 CNA's to about 50 pt's. That is ideal and happens about 2 to 3 days a week when there are no call in's. We usually work with 1 nurse, 2 CMA's and 4 CNA's to 50 pt's. That is not horrible but it is very busy. We have alot of treatments, tube feedings, trach cares, vital signs, medicare charting, tab and chair alerts going off, you know the story.
    As nurses we are usually done an hour or two after our 12 hour shift ends. We had a meeting a couple weeks ago about why we are getting done so late. We are now going to be talked to by the administrator and DON everytime we are done late to give them an explanation. I can see alot going undone just so the nurses don't have to answer to why they can't get things done in their shift. This is definately not what the patients deserve.
    I am glad that I don't work with some to the staff patient ratios I have read about on here.
  13. by   nitewarrior
    It seems like every LTC has the same problems mine does. If we do get mgmt to hire extra nurses and aides, somebody gets mad and quits because they still end up pulling a night short staffed. We have a 60 bed facility and I have worked it with only 1 other CNA and 1 nurse. And of course that is the night that everyone decides to go crazy. Fullmoonitis.
    I have tried to find the staffing regs on my state's website but they arent listed.
    Right now we generally have enough aides on the floor but our nurse has been by herself for 3 nightshifts. She cant get med pass done in time frame and we are due for a state inspection. Still with mgmt knowing this, they wont help. Too many bosses and not enough workers, is our biggest problem.

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