Advice on how to QUIT professionally - page 2

Hi All, I have started a previous thread titled lowest of the low. I have finally gotten to the point where I am ready to quit. I have been meticulous in my documentation, I have been extremely... Read More

  1. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from EmerNurse
    Actually, I think you have TWO letters to write. One to address the accusations against you, along the lines of...

    "I would like to address certain comments brought to my attention. I take my responsibility as a nurse very seriously and am very careful to <insert task, VS whatever> in a consciencious (bah sp???) manner. I was shocked and concerned that I was percieved by <person, if you know who> as not accomplishing <task(s)>. Blah blah" Without getting defensive, standing by your professional nursing practice, no blaming, etc.

    The second letter is your resignation which comes maybe 2-3 days after the first, depending on the response from the first (of which you should keep a copy - you CC your boss, the manager and anyone else who should see it and send those copies YOURSELF). The resignation is very professional as well, as stated by the poster above, and might go something like this..... "Dear <whoever(s) - again CC>, Please accept this letter as my formal written resignation from employment with <place name>. My last day of work will be on <give TWO weeks notice minimum please>. I want to express my appreciate for the opportunity to work for <place>. I gained valuable knowledge and experience <do not say it was CRAP experience even though it was> and I know I will take these early lessons with me throughout my nursing career. I have been honored to work with some extremely knowledgable and professional co-workers (no names here, even if it is only the housekeeper!). I sincerely regret that I am unable to continue employment at <place>. Sincerely, <you>.

    Yeah it's a bunch of mush and the resignation letter doesn't mention thing one about the problems there, but your goal is to leave on good terms, not vent. CC the resignation to the same folks you CC the other letter to, and they'll know why you left LOL.

    This is just MHO, but maybe it'll help. Good luck!
    I'm not sure I'd write the first letter. If you have talked things over with your boss and gotten nowhere, if you have spoken with anyone else in authority and all to no avail, why do it again now? They have let you down and do not deserve a good nurse like you.

    Just say "I regret that I must ask you to accept my resignation, for personal reasons. My last day of work will be (minimum 2 weeks' notice or whatever you agreed to when you hired on).

    I have learned many valuable lessons (and you really have, however negative) here at Droopy Drawers Nursing Facility and will apply these lessons to my future work as an RN.

    Thank you.

    Sincerely,

    Nancy Nurse

    When queried as to what personal reasons, just say Oh, I need to spend more time at home with my family or we're moving to Alaska or I have a chance to travel or your husband/boyfriend/SO is being transferred or I need a little time to find myself or whatever baloney comes to mind. Heck, they might offer you a leave of absence and you can decide whether or not to accept it. Maybe some good can come of all of this. When and if they discover that you didn't move, just say the plans fell through.

    I would want to be sure that Ms. Fake Nurse and cohorts aren't trying to tell your BON that you're doing anything wrong, unethical, or illegal. Accusing you of not doing VS is pretty serious. I had to laugh about the calcium tablet. Not that an error is funny but look how we stress about the smallest thing.

    This all kind of makes you want to put taps on phones and secret recorders and cameras all over there, doesn't it?

    Best wishes. You'll be ok.
  2. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from KristyBRN
    I resigned today, and I did so with the short and sweet professional letter. I also wrote the long detailed one, but kept that for my own records. The DON was very nice, told me should wouldnt give out any details, and when I asked what she would say if asked if she would rehire me, she said she would say yes. She felt I needed a little more experience and a different floor, that the one I was on was not a good fit. So, no burnt bridges, left on a good note. The only sad part was I went to say goodbye to my patients, (the coherent ones, of course,) and my MS patient cried. I feel bad, but I think I would have felt worse if I just left and did not say goodbye.
    Again, thanks for the advice everyone.
    KristyBRN
    Whoops, looks like I was too late with my advice. But how are you now, what is your plan at this point?
  3. by   lvs2nrs3535
    I think I did the right thing. At this point I am just licking my wounds, and trying really hard not to wallow in self pity. Every exprerience is a learning one right? Still, my overall demaneanor at this point is just plain old :smackingf but mostly
    I will pick myself up by my bootstraps tomorrow, sometimes we just need time to grieve, right? (At least I hope I am right and not wallowing.) Starting over yet again, .........sigh..............
    Thanks again for the support guys. Nobody understands like you all do.
    KristyBRN
  4. by   lvs2nrs3535
    I have to say, the pint of ben and jerrys, the comfy jammies and slippers, a good book and my kittty on my chest sound like the therapy I need right now. Course that will all have to come after getting the thwo adhd kids to bed, cleaning up after supper, stroking the ego, (and yup thas is ALL for tonight!!) of the hubbie and then retreat with a no enter sign. I need my recoup time. Anyone else have any good ideas when you are just burnt, bummed and feeling totally depresses? (good ones, ben and jerrys is about the worst I want to abuse my body, ya know?)
    Kris
  5. by   bargainhound
    Rest and time will help you to get your attitude back/heal the hurts from
    the bad experience.

    Fill your time with things you enjoy doing as much as you can.

    Take the opportunity to think about other types of nursing or other
    types of employers.
  6. by   augigi
    Write your list of expectations of your next unit/employer so you can be prepared at your next interview!
  7. by   paradise22
    Last edit by paradise22 on Nov 6, '06 : Reason: Wrong thread
  8. by   ebony2
    Hi Kristy,
    I'm very sorry your first nursing job experience has been so hard for you. The advice given on submitting your resignation is very sound advice indeed. I know making a decision regarding where to start your nursing carrer is a tough job. Your are at the most gung-ho period of your carreer. You're evaluating the wages being offered, shifts available , you may even feel that you are ready to be supernurse and ready to save I also would suggest you to consider what is best for you during your carreer. It is my experience that every new nurse needs to strenghten her basic nursing skills in an acute care setting, this gives you the foundation to broaden your assessment skills and allows you to better understand where you want to go. The tendency to get thrown to the wolves is less likely to happen because the setting is more enlightened and more vested in you succeeding and not setting you up to fail. When I graduated many moons ago my first employment was in a community hospital. I was hired as a 3-11 staff nurse on a med-surg unit.I was told as a new grad I would not be left alone. My first night on the job there was myself and 3 na's. I was forced into a sink or swim situation. That would never happen to me today, thank goodness for progress. Whatever you decide to do good luck and remember while interviewing it's a two way street. They not only have to like what you have to offer but YOU also have to like what they are selling so don't feel shy in asking the questions you need to get the best picture you can. Go for the gold.............Good Luck
  9. by   spaniel
    Your post caught my eye. And first off let me say congratulations on resigning. I have worked in the health care field since the mid 70's and I am seeing things I have never seen before in my life . I am an RN -happen to have a doctorate and work in a consulting capacity in LTC. (Other roles included CCU,cancer care, psych, home care...) I am noting a real tendency of fabricated accusations. The latest where I work is that CNAs are (falsely) accusing the RN supervisors of some major things (i.e. sexual abuse). This is very very freaky. I have indeed tried to speak to people at the state level regarding issues .
    To get to the point- this time try to work in a place with the best possible reputation. Can you go to a place that is a teaching hospital?
  10. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from spaniel
    Your post caught my eye. And first off let me say congratulations on resigning. I have worked in the health care field since the mid 70's and I am seeing things I have never seen before in my life . I am an RN -happen to have a doctorate and work in a consulting capacity in LTC. (Other roles included CCU,cancer care, psych, home care...) I am noting a real tendency of fabricated accusations. The latest where I work is that CNAs are (falsely) accusing the RN supervisors of some major things (i.e. sexual abuse). This is very very freaky. I have indeed tried to speak to people at the state level regarding issues .
    To get to the point- this time try to work in a place with the best possible reputation. Can you go to a place that is a teaching hospital?

    My best friend (RN for 25 years) was working at a LTC, and
    disciplined two CNAs for leaving the facility while on duty.

    They took their revenge by concocting a story that she "abused" the corpse of a hospice pt. She was fired. She is a wonderful nurse and this devastated her. One of the CNAs even called her at home and said "ha ha, we got rid of you" then hung up.

    I know of several other situations where dominant, agressive, CNAs who "run" a facility have made false accusations against nurses.

    I wonder what's behind this trend?

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