A different smoking question....

  1. What do you think of this? Our facility is smoke free - no smoking allowed indoors, period. However.....one resident recently came back from having back surgery in hospital and is bed bound. Long-time smoker. He can't get out of bed except twice a week up in a chair. So now this resident is allowed to smoke in his room, supervised. He has a roommate who does not smoke, but isn't a/o enough to complain, I'm sure. Supposedly everyone has ok'd this to happen, but I don't agree. If we're a smoke free facility, and it's posted for the public as such, and other residents aren't allowed to smoke in their rooms then why should this one? I know he's bed bound, and he has a right to smoke if he wants. But do his rights overpower his roommate who shares the room? I guess I have mixed opinions on this. What do you think?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   Nurse Ratched
    I wonder what the state would say about that. As I posted on another thread, many third party billers now have a caveat that facilities must be smoke-free.

    Either it's policy or it's not.

    Our hospital allows smoking inside designated smoking rooms on the adult psych wards despite a now county-wide ban on smoking inside all public buildings and places of employment. It's wrong (read: illegal), but it's hard to know what to do about it, especially since I asked the CEO of the hospital about it and he is content to allow it to continue. Depends on how much you are willing to squawk, I guess.
  4. by   LTC_LPN
    Quote from Nurse Ratched
    I wonder what the state would say about that. As I posted on another thread, many third party billers now have a caveat that facilities must be smoke-free.

    Either it's policy or it's not.

    Our hospital allows smoking inside designated smoking rooms on the adult psych wards despite a now county-wide ban on smoking inside all public buildings and places of employment. It's wrong (read: illegal), but it's hard to know what to do about it, especially since I asked the CEO of the hospital about it and he is content to allow it to continue. Depends on how much you are willing to squawk, I guess.
    We do have a designated smoking area for people to use, but since he can't get out of bed he can't get there. Supposedly this is short-term until he is able to sit up in a w/c.
  5. by   Nurse Ratched
    Quote from LTC_LPN
    We do have a designated smoking area for people to use, but since he can't get out of bed he can't get there. Supposedly this is short-term until he is able to sit up in a w/c.
    I agree with you that it's not right. I don't know what's wrong with a nicotine patch in this and similar situations.

    I've never been a smoker, so I guess I'm not terribly sympathetic regarding these things. My beef is personal safety in the cases where someone wants to smoke but isn't safe to do so independently, staff rights (someone has to supervise this person so the house isn't burned down) and the rights of the other residents not to be exposed to second-hand smoke. How far are staff required to go to ensure a patient's right to smoke (if indeed there is such a thing.)
  6. by   MandyInMS
    Let him room with another smoker maybe?
  7. by   purplemania
    In our facility the patient would be offered patches or meds to cope with the withdrawal, but not allowed to smoke, even in a private room. This guy evidently has some pull.
  8. by   RNIAM
    I personally believe that it is wrong to subject anyone to second hand smoke. If the roommate can't speak for himself them the nurse should do it for him/her. If there is a no smoking policy then it is a no smoking policy. I do feel for the person laid up in bed but his desires don't overshadow other needs for clean air.
  9. by   itsme
    Smoking in a bed??? fire hazaard!!!
  10. by   DC2RN
    NYC is now entirely smoke free in all public buildings, no exceptions. (Bars, restaurants, all jobs.) I love it. People argue that smokers should have a special section of a restaurant where they could smoke. What they forget is that some waiter or waitress is exposed to second hand smoke for their entire shift.
  11. by   Destinystar
    in california you cannot smoke indoors inside any public building state law. if a patient wants to smoke staff, family or pt. has to go outside to an area that is not off limits. exposing staff or other patients to second hand smoke is wrong. one persons rights can not interfere with anothers. i dont smoke and i have the right to object to anything that is against my morals and smoking is. not my place to accomodate anyones smoking.
    Quote from ltc_lpn
    what do you think of this? our facility is smoke free - no smoking allowed indoors, period. however.....one resident recently came back from having back surgery in hospital and is bed bound. long-time smoker. he can't get out of bed except twice a week up in a chair. so now this resident is allowed to smoke in his room, supervised. he has a roommate who does not smoke, but isn't a/o enough to complain, i'm sure. supposedly everyone has ok'd this to happen, but i don't agree. if we're a smoke free facility, and it's posted for the public as such, and other residents aren't allowed to smoke in their rooms then why should this one? i know he's bed bound, and he has a right to smoke if he wants. but do his rights overpower his roommate who shares the room? i guess i have mixed opinions on this. what do you think?

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