Info on Lanier Tech and NLN Test

  1. Hello everyone I am new here and wanted to ask a couple of questions.
    1st has anyone went to Lanier Tech's nursing progarm? How are the teachers and the program?

    2nd How hard was the NLN test? I have the study guide, will this be enough to help me pass the test and get into the program?

    Hopefully I will start their Nursing program in the Spring Quater (starts March 31). Any info you can give would be helpful.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   jb2u
    I do not have an answer to your question, but welcome to allnurses.com
  4. by   NURSEQT2B
    Hi Sweet Pea,
    I just took the NLN for Lanier Tech in Sept. All I did was study the review guide and I scored in the 92% so as long as you do that you should be fine. One of my friends just finished the program she says its a lot of work but its doable. She liked most of her instructors, lol. I'm just waiting to see if I will be accepted into the Winter program at Oakwood.THe wait is killing me. The person supervising the test said that students accepted into Oakwoods program usually score above 90. Forsyth is usally high 70's to 90's. Hope it all goes well for you. Keep me posted and welcome.
  5. by   Sweet Pea 1
    I talked to my advisor yesterday and she said that I needed to make in the 90% to be sure I got in. I take the test on Jan 4th. I hope to get into the spring program at the Forsyth campus. Thanks for the reply and let me know if you got in or not. Did they say how long it takes for them to let you know?
  6. by   dmarie (GA)
    Hi. I graduated from Lanier Tech's Cumming LPN program in September. I'm now awaiting an NCLEX test date which should be in a couple of weeks!

    There is a study guide for the NLN test. I recommend you get that and study it. The program only accepts a certain number of people, so the higher you score, the better obviously. I found the study guide/workbook for the NLN to be very helpful and similar to the actual test, so it's definitely worth investing in!

    The school looks at your overall score --- so if you score lower on the science and more in the math, or english, or whatever, it's all averaged together to get one final overall score. Your score is compared to the national average. So if you score a 93%, it means you scored better than 93% of the others who took it nationally. Anything above a 90% is great. I personally scored in the mid 90's. However, there were a couple of girls in my class who scored in the high 70's and 80's ---- so it's really a matter of how your score compares to the others who are taking it and applying to the school at the same time you are. The school takes those 20 students who score highest. They also look at your GPA from your core classes.

    With my class, there were a couple of girls selected to be on a wait list in case one of the top 20 couldn't join the class. And as it turned out, a couple of the girls on the wait list were asked to join after Orientation because a couple of the original 20 decided they couldn't do the program. One of these actually scored in the 70's on her NLN! But a spot became available, and she got in!

    The program requires a commitment. Most of the girls had quit their jobs by the 3rd and 4th quarter because with class time, clinicals, homework, study time, trips to Milledgeville and Moultrie, etc, there simply isn't time to hold down a job and be successful in the program. Also, with our class, we often were not given a clinical schedule until the last minute, so it's nearly impossible to keep a regular work schedule when your school and clinical schedule is so unpredictable.

    Many of the girls were able to complete the program with kids at home, but they had a strong support system to help with babysitting or a good hubby to help out.
    I personally don't have kids but I know it's possible to complete the program with kids if you're very organized and flexible.

    IM or email me if you have any questions. I also have a friend in the 4th quarter at Oakwood right now, so I can give you the scoop on that location also!

    Good Luck!
  7. by   Sweet Pea 1
    Hi dmarie, where did you guys do clinicals? You said you had trips to Milledgeville and Moultrie was this for clinicals? Are there any teachers I should try to stay away from. Anything you can tell me to help me get through the program would be great.:spin:
  8. by   dmarie (GA)
    Hey.

    Well, in 3rd quarter, you have to do Psychiatric Clinicals. Ours was held at Central State Hospital in Milledgeville, Georgia. We were responsible for getting there and our hotel room. It was a 3 day/2 night deal. Most of the girls shared hotel rooms to save money. As for Moultrie --- in 4th quarter we were required to complete a NCLEX review course. The course we were asked to complete is located in Moultrie, Georgia. It's a 2 day/1 night deal. Transportation, hotel, and cost of the course is your responsibility and is required.

    All of this is explained during Orientation. It's also explained that working a full time job in this program is virtually impossible --- and a part time job is difficult, especially in 3rd and 4th quarter when you have more clinical time and more difficult course work. That's why a few of the girls decided after Orientation they weren't up for it, and so the wait-listed girls were able to get their spots. 1st quarter isn't so bad, because you only have 1 clinical day per week plus lecture days, but beginning in 2nd quarter, you have 2 12-hr. clinical days per week plus classroom time, not to mention studying, care plans, drug cards, etc, etc. In my particular group, we were sometimes assigned 3 12-hr. clinical days per week in 2nd quarter, and 4th quarter is absolutely crazy with Pediatric clinicals, Mother/Baby clinicals, and Leadership clinicals in addition to classroom time, care plans, exams, etc.

    But, there were a couple of girls who worked as waitresses on the weekends throughout the entire program, so it's POSSIBLE to do if you have an employer that's flexible and understanding, and it helps if you have ALOT of energy! Having kids, especially young ones, is challenging also, but as I mentioned, if you have a great support system in place, it's possible.

    Depending on the quarter you're in, clinicals consist of different skills and activities. You start off doing basic PCT/Nursing Assistant type of stuff in a hospital or nursing home, and as the program progresses and you learn more skills, you are required to do more.

    1st quarter, you're giving bed baths, changing linens, toileting, changing briefs, feeding, cleaning, ADL's, you know...the basics. You also begin dabbling in Care Plans and working on drug cards. 1st quarter you will also take a Med-Math class in which you do drug calculations. It's never too early to start brushing up on your math skills. We weren't allowed to use calculators.

    2nd quarter they kick it up a notch. You're expected to have Care Plans completed each week on the client you're assigned to, and you're expected to begin reading charts, giving medications/injections/treatments under the watchful eye of your clinical instructor, efficiently performing Head to Toe assessment on your patient, inserting Foley catheters, changing dressings, etc, in addition to all the basics you're already doing.

    3rd quarter is more of the same stuff, but you're expected to be performing at a more efficient and comfortable level. You are expected to be able to juggle 2 patients by the end of this quarter.

    4th quarter as I mentioned is Pediatrics, Mother/Baby, and Leadership. In all of these clinicals, you are expected to function in the capacity of an LPN, reading the chart, giving meds and treatments, etc. etc.

    There are a few things that will help you make it through this program. First, you have to be flexible no matter what. Things change on a dime, hours are switched around, tests are rescheduled, etc. You have to be flexible and willing to go with the flow. Second, you have to really, really want to be a nurse! You have to be willing to make a commitment, show up on time, dress professionally, and take the program seriously. You must realize that they will not spoon feed you the information. Using just your textbook doesn't cut it. You will need to invest in several supplemental books as well on your own. They tell you to "take responsibility for your own learning" and they mean it! Don't be surprised if your exam contains questions that weren't in your textbook. They expect you to supplement your education on your own, do your own research, and learn how to critically think. The questions on the exams aren't like the classes you are use to. With the multiple choice questions, all 4 options are correct, but you have to choose the one that is MOST correct. At first, this is frustrating, because you can study for days and still fail a test based on this testing technique. Thirdly, you have to stay focused and keep your eye on the prize. We started with 20 people and graduated with 12. Hang in there, ask questions, and be flexible. :spin::spin:

    Good luck!
    Last edit by dmarie (GA) on Nov 4, '07
  9. by   sheri_u2
    Quote from dmarie (GA)
    Hey.

    Well, in 3rd quarter, you have to do Psychiatric Clinicals. Ours was held at Central State Hospital in Milledgeville, Georgia. We were responsible for getting there and our hotel room. It was a 3 day/2 night deal. Most of the girls shared hotel rooms to save money. As for Moultrie --- in 4th quarter we were required to complete a NCLEX review course. The course we were asked to complete is located in Moultrie, Georgia. It's a 2 day/1 night deal. Transportation, hotel, and cost of the course is your responsibility and is required.

    All of this is explained during Orientation. It's also explained that working a full time job in this program is virtually impossible --- and a part time job is difficult, especially in 3rd and 4th quarter when you have more clinical time and more difficult course work. That's why a few of the girls decided after Orientation they weren't up for it, and so the wait-listed girls were able to get their spots. 1st quarter isn't so bad, because you only have 1 clinical day per week plus lecture days, but beginning in 2nd quarter, you have 2 12-hr. clinical days per week plus classroom time, not to mention studying, care plans, drug cards, etc, etc. In my particular group, we were sometimes assigned 3 12-hr. clinical days per week in 2nd quarter, and 4th quarter is absolutely crazy with Pediatric clinicals, Mother/Baby clinicals, and Leadership clinicals in addition to classroom time, care plans, exams, etc.

    But, there were a couple of girls who worked as waitresses on the weekends throughout the entire program, so it's POSSIBLE to do if you have an employer that's flexible and understanding, and it helps if you have ALOT of energy! Having kids, especially young ones, is challenging also, but as I mentioned, if you have a great support system in place, it's possible.

    Depending on the quarter you're in, clinicals consist of different skills and activities. You start off doing basic PCT/Nursing Assistant type of stuff in a hospital or nursing home, and as the program progresses and you learn more skills, you are required to do more.

    1st quarter, you're giving bed baths, changing linens, toileting, changing briefs, feeding, cleaning, ADL's, you know...the basics. You also begin dabbling in Care Plans and working on drug cards. 1st quarter you will also take a Med-Math class in which you do drug calculations. It's never too early to start brushing up on your math skills. We weren't allowed to use calculators.

    2nd quarter they kick it up a notch. You're expected to have Care Plans completed each week on the client you're assigned to, and you're expected to begin reading charts, giving medications/injections/treatments under the watchful eye of your clinical instructor, efficiently performing Head to Toe assessment on your patient, inserting Foley catheters, changing dressings, etc, in addition to all the basics you're already doing.

    3rd quarter is more of the same stuff, but you're expected to be performing at a more efficient and comfortable level. You are expected to be able to juggle 2 patients by the end of this quarter.

    4th quarter as I mentioned is Pediatrics, Mother/Baby, and Leadership. In all of these clinicals, you are expected to function in the capacity of an LPN, reading the chart, giving meds and treatments, etc. etc.

    There are a few things that will help you make it through this program. First, you have to be flexible no matter what. Things change on a dime, hours are switched around, tests are rescheduled, etc. You have to be flexible and willing to go with the flow. Second, you have to really, really want to be a nurse! You have to be willing to make a commitment, show up on time, dress professionally, and take the program seriously. You must realize that they will not spoon feed you the information. Using just your textbook doesn't cut it. You will need to invest in several supplemental books as well on your own. They tell you to "take responsibility for your own learning" and they mean it! Don't be surprised if your exam contains questions that weren't in your textbook. They expect you to supplement your education on your own, do your own research, and learn how to critically think. The questions on the exams aren't like the classes you are use to. With the multiple choice questions, all 4 options are correct, but you have to choose the one that is MOST correct. At first, this is frustrating, because you can study for days and still fail a test based on this testing technique. Thirdly, you have to stay focused and keep your eye on the prize. We started with 20 people and graduated with 12. Hang in there, ask questions, and be flexible. :spin::spin:

    Good luck!
    Very Helpful Dee Dee...................I was your friend at GPC and got injured in the first month and had to leave.................don't know if you remember me

    I'm just now considering going back and since I already attended Lanier last year I figured I'm going to try for the LPN there. I recocognized your name right away and your post was VERY helpful. I'm finding very little info like what can be found on "allnurses............" so your insite is appreciated.

    Sounds like LPN is just as demanding as the RN program. However, it also sounds like your chances of success are better. Would you agree? PM me and let me know :spin:
  10. by   NURSEQT2B
    Well guys I gt my acceptance letter for the Winter '08 class at Oakwood. I'll let you know how it works out. I'm really excited. I can't wait to find out where clinicals are.
  11. by   dmarie (GA)
    Very Helpful Dee Dee...................I was your friend at GPC and got injured in the first month and had to leave.................don't know if you remember me
    Hey Sheri! Of course I remember you! How are you? :spin::spin::spin:

    Yes, the LPN program is challenging, but the class is much smaller, and you only have 1 teacher for the whole Quarter, which is nice because you can get a feel for her teaching style and exams. GPC had several teachers each Semester and several teachers making up the exam questions, which made it much more difficult.

    I found the LPN program to be fairly easy. The hardest part about it was the 12 hour long clinical days, which can be really exhausting! The exam content is obviously not as in-depth as RN material, but the tests still require critical thinking. I made A's and B's in all classes and clinicals in the program, so it's definitely doable!

    Now that I'm graduated and awaiting my NCLEX test date, I'm planning ahead and looking into Excelsior. It shouldn't take more than a year to finish with my RN, and I can work as an LPN while I do it online! One small loop hole in Georgia is that you have to get licensed in another state and then transfer it in as an Excelsior grad. But I've spoken to the GBON several times and they assure me that nothing else is required other than a transfer fee for new grads. So I'm really excited about it!

    I say go for it with Lanier. Be forewarned that the Forsyth Campus will be undergoing many changes in the coming year. PM me for more information.

    One great positive about Lanier is that it's entirely covered by the Hope Grant! I paid no money out of pocket for tuition, and I had $100 book credit each Quarter. All Georgia residents qualify for the Hope Grant at technical schools (as oppossed to the Hope Scholorship which requires you maintain a certain GPA) as long as you haven't defaulted on any loans in the past.

    Let me know how you're doing and what you decide!
    Last edit by dmarie (GA) on Nov 6, '07
  12. by   Sweet Pea 1
    dmarie,

    who was the program director when you were there? J H is the program director now. She seems to be good, she is my advisor and has really helped me with everything. Hopefully all of the teachers are nice, or at least fair.
    Last edit by jb2u on Nov 6, '07 : Reason: removed director's name
  13. by   dmarie (GA)
    Yes, she is the Director of Nursing at Lanier Forsyth. She is also an instructor 1st and 3rd Quarter. I graduated in late September, and I just spoke to her yesterday, so I know she is still there.

    All I can say without getting too specific is that you can expect changes to be made. A new Director and new instructors will be implemented. PM me for more information. Thanks.
    Last edit by dmarie (GA) on Nov 6, '07
  14. by   Sweet Pea 1
    dmarie, How far in advance did they let you know that you have gotten into the program?

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