Why Not Just Do A Bsn Program???

  1. I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse? Considering the fact that I am in a BSN program and I can barely keep up with all of the tons of info that they throw at us, I wonder how you can possible obtain all that info in a ADN program. And further more from what I understand, with all the pre-reqs that you have to take, it ends up taking the average ADN student 3 years to finish anyway. So why not just do a 4 year program???

    BE gentle...
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  2. 89 Comments

  3. by   txspadequeenRN
    I cant even commit right now!!!



    Quote from HU_nurse
    I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse? Considering the fact that I am in a BSN program and I can barely keep up with all of the tons of info that they throw at us, I wonder how you can possible obtain all that info in a ADN program. And further more from what I understand, with all the pre-reqs that you have to take, it ends up taking the average ADN student 3 years to finish anyway. So why not just do a 4 year program???

    BE gentle...
  4. by   BamaGirlRN
    I am sure you can find all the info you need in the many threads on the same subject.

    As for retaining all the information in an ASN program it can be done and the 100% pass rate my school has for the Nclex proves it.
  5. by   HU_nurse
    I'm not looking for "info." What I am asking is for the opinion of ADN students and why they chose that route rather than the BSN route and do they think that they can be just as competent as a BSN nurse...
  6. by   Sheri257
    Well, for one thing, the BSN program in my area has a 70 percent NCLEX pass rate, well below the state and national average.

    So, that's why.

  7. by   HU_nurse
    Not sure if I understand LIzz...anyways, I also want to hear from ADN student: how many of you actually finish in 2 years? and if its gonna take u three, then why not do a 4 yr program?
  8. by   MaggieJo
    Well, I can tell you from my point of view, that I did the BSN because it was going to take me the same amount of time to get my ADN as my BSN. As for the retaining the information, well, I believe I can say for certain that the ADN graduate's don't have any more trouble retaining the information than BSN graduates. It doesn't matter which program you're in, the actual NURSING classes are all two years --- ADN or BSN. I only know of a couple five semester nursing programs in a BSN route, and for all of those, there are five semester nursing programs in an ADN route. Anyway, just thought I would give my opinion since I researched both before I chose my path. The BSN route was the same amount of time, for me, as the ADN route would have been.
    -Maggie
  9. by   BamaGirlRN
    By info I mean the BSN V. ASN threads, they can be very helpful in answering your questions.

    Some schools only offer ASN and then a RN to BSN program, that's the reason I did ASN first. I am now enrolled in the BSN program. And an ASN at the school I attended could be done in 2 years!
  10. by   lisamc1RN
    I'm not an ADN, but I think the answers are fairly obvious. If someone doesn't feel they will make a competent nurse, then I doubt they would spend ANY time on that particular program. Also, time and money may not be as abundant with some people as it is for others. If someone is satisfied with their education, and the employers are in agreement and HIRE them, then I can't see where the problem is. I, for one, am thankful for the many different avenues there are to achieve my dreams of becoming a nurse. I plan on becoming an ADN someday, and maybe a BSN, but it will not be because I believe one to be more competent than the other.
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from HU_nurse
    Not sure if I understand LIzz...
    If a program has a low NCLEX pass rate, i.e., fewer students pass the RN licensing exam than other schools, on average, chances are it's not a great program.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 24, '04
  12. by   klone
    Quote from HU_nurse
    I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse?
    Yes. The additional classes that a BSN must take are electives that have nothing to do with nursing, as well as nursing theory and leadership classes, which will not affect my ability to care for a patient. My clinical experience will be just as thorough as yours.

    And further more from what I understand, with all the pre-reqs that you have to take, it ends up taking the average ADN student 3 years to finish anyway. So why not just do a 4 year program???
    Because that's one extra year that I would be in school instead of out in the field working. So while you're finishing up your BSN, I'm actually working and gaining hands-on, practical experience. So who will be the more experienced and competent nurse by the time *you* graduate?

    Furthermore, the ADN program is about 1/4 the cost as a BSN program at a university. There is a CC with an ADN program 10 miles from my house, whereas the closest school to offer a BSN program is 1 1/2 hours away. Also, once I'm working, I'll be able to do an RN->BSN program that will be paid for by my employer. Why pay out of pocket for something that my employer is willing to pay for as part of my work benefits?

    So that's why I am going for an ADN instead of a BSN.
    Last edit by klone on May 24, '04
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Because the BSN program was 3 hours away one way and the ADN program was 1 1/2 hours away. It was simply a logistical issue.

    And the core nursing classes are the same so we ADN gals and guys had to learn the same stuff you are "barely keeping up with".

    steph
  14. by   HU_nurse
    Quote from MaggieJo
    Well, I can tell you from my point of view, that I did the BSN because it was going to take me the same amount of time to get my ADN as my BSN. As for the retaining the information, well, I believe I can say for certain that the ADN graduate's don't have any more trouble retaining the information than BSN graduates. It doesn't matter which program you're in, the actual NURSING classes are all two years --- ADN or BSN. I only know of a couple five semester nursing programs in a BSN route, and for all of those, there are five semester nursing programs in an ADN route. Anyway, just thought I would give my opinion since I researched both before I chose my path. The BSN route was the same amount of time, for me, as the ADN route would have been.
    -Maggie
    Exactly, if they are going to take just about the same amount of time, then why not go ahead and get the higher degree? as far as their competency level, i never said that they WERENT as competent, I was just asking for opinions. Personally, I think they are...

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