Why Not Just Do A Bsn Program??? - page 6

I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse? Considering the... Read More

  1. by   angel337
    Quote from HU_nurse
    LOOK PEOPLE, GET OVER IT! YOU GUYS WILL NEVER CHANGE MY MIND ON THIS SO WHY ARE GUYS GETTING SOOOOO TOUCHY ABOUT IT. AND LIKE I SAID, I WILL ONLY BE A BEDSIDE NURSE FOR THE REQUIRED YEAR B4 GOING BACK TO GRAD SCHOOL IN WHICH CASE I WILL NOT BE TAKING ORDERS FROM AN ADN NURSE OR BSN NURSE FOR THAT MATTER. SO THAT'S WHAT I SHOULD HAVE SAID SO I WILL REPHRASE IT: "AFTER COMPLETING MY REQUIRED YEAR OF BEDSIDE NURSING, I WILL NEVER TAKE ORDERS FROM AN ADN NURSE AGAIN!" HAPPY WELL PEOPLE I'M GETTING OFF WORK NOW BUT IT WAS CERTAINLY NICE HAVING THIS DISCUSSION WITH YOU GUYS AND I WILL PICK UP WHERE I LEFT OFF PISWSING YOU TOUCHY NURSES OFF TOMMOROW.:chuckle :chuckle :chuckle
    you appear to have anger management issues. if you think you won't be taking orders from a adn nurse then i suggest you find another career or you will be working alone. btw, i have a bsn and half of my charge nurses are adn's. i could care less, because in a crisis guess who you will be calling? the new grad with the bsn or the 10-20 yr experienced diploma nurse. get real.
  2. by   Brickman
    Quote from HU_nurse
    "AFTER COMPLETING MY REQUIRED YEAR OF BEDSIDE NURSING, I WILL NEVER TAKE ORDERS FROM AN ADN NURSE AGAIN!" HAPPY
    Something tells me that the chances of you completeing one year of nursing are pretty slim.
  3. by   luckyladyore
    I started out doing the 2 plus 2 with the Associate being earned at the end of the 2 yrs and then 2 towards your bachelors and clinicals at the end. I wanted to do the ADN because the WAITING LIST is so long..... Im willing to do anything to get in Im just wanting to get into some program!!!!!!
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from HU_nurse
    I'm not looking for "info." What I am asking is for the opinion of ADN students and why they chose that route rather than the BSN route and do they think that they can be just as competent as a BSN nurse...

    I'm not going to read every answer or get too involved. I'm just going to answer your question. In the city I was in there was only an ADN program offered. I was in my 30s and had decided to follow a goal I was to become a nurse. At this point in my life I couldn't afford to go to the major university, couldn't afford to move, had to work full time and go to the only program offered in my area, which was a noncompetetive first-come-first-serve cheapo community college. It was NLN approved and I passed NCLEX on the first try.

    BSNs by nature have more information than an ADN, so it's a no brainer that the ADN programs don't fit in all that's in a BSN program. ADNs don't try to fit in all that is in the BSN program.

    I always advise people who have a choice to choose BSN.
  5. by   RedSox33RN
    Quote from HU_nurse
    AFTER COMPLETING MY REQUIRED YEAR OF BEDSIDE NURSING, I WILL NEVER TAKE ORDERS FROM AN ADN NURSE AGAIN
    So you what, plan on asking someone what kind of degree they have every time you are given an order or task? The nurses in two hospitals I go to have name tags that say "Registered Nurse", not ADN or BSN or MSN. Or are you going to only apply to facilities that will let you decide what you want on your name tag?

    I agree, I don't think you'll make it through a year either with that attitude. And that's MY OPINION.
  6. by   jackleg27
    Quote from HU_nurse
    I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse? Considering the fact that I am in a BSN program and I can barely keep up with all of the tons of info that they throw at us, I wonder how you can possible obtain all that info in a ADN program. And further more from what I understand, with all the pre-reqs that you have to take, it ends up taking the average ADN student 3 years to finish anyway. So why not just do a 4 year program???

    BE gentle...
    Why not do your ADN then get your employer to pay for the bridge program RN-BSN makes good economical sense to me. That is what I am doing.
  7. by   jenrninmi
    [QUOTE=pama]
    The NCLEX-RN is the final measure for all RN graduates, and if you look you will find ADN graduates out score BSN graduates on the NCLECX-RN. QUOTE]

    This is not true. It may be true in some cases but definately not in all. People on this board are also constantly saying that adn programs get more clinical hours than BSN programs and I have shown several people on this board that my BSN program has TWICE the hours as theirs.

    To the OP, you also need to look at the graduation rate, not just the NCLEX pass rate. The NCLEX pass rate may be 100% at a certain school, but if only 10 people graduated, what does that say? To the people with the 100% NCLEX pass rate, what is your graduation rate?
  8. by   Altra
    Quote from JENRN2BMICHIGAN
    To the OP, you also need to look at the graduation rate, not just the NCLEX pass rate. The NCLEX pass rate may be 100% at a certain school, but if only 10 people graduated, what does that say? To the people with the 100% NCLEX pass rate, what is your graduation rate?
    The NCLEX pass rate was a primary deciding factor for me to choose a program. If a school has a low percentage of students who graduate, but a 100% pass rate, that just tells me that it is a difficult program, but those who complete it are well-prepared GNs, whether that is 10 students or 100. It's up to me to be one of those 10.

    Good luck to all.
  9. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Kabin
    From what I gathered, nursing pay works under unusual rules (socialistic?) from other professions. From what I've been told/read in these forums, BSN grads start off at about the same pay without taking into account many pertinent factors. And frankly, that's something that doesn't happen in many other employment fields.

    In almost any other field, graduates are rewarded for: better academics, better attended schools, more difficult degrees, more challenging course loads, etc. It may be part of what is wrong with nursing today. Where is the incentive for new nursing students to acheive higher goals?
    I totally agree.
  10. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Cherish
    I am not in a diploma program, but if I was to be HR Manager (I think schools to me need way more clinicals), then diploma RN should get paid more, since its 3 yrs of clinicals, nothing else.
    Are you saying a diploma nursing program doesn't get any theory? How do they learn why they are doing certain procedures?
  11. by   Altra
    Quote from JENRN2BMICHIGAN
    Are you saying a diploma nursing program doesn't get any theory? How do they learn why they are doing certain procedures?
    Not to worry ... the diploma programs include the same courses as ADN & BSN nursing programs. And they also include A&P, micro, etc. - courses that are typically pre-reqs for ADN programs. Otherwise, diploma RNs couldn't possibly function, could they?

    BTW, I would support the gradual transition toward bachelor's degree education being the standard for entry-level nurses. Any reasonable proposal would have to "grandfather in" all existing licensed RNs. But until that happens, the diploma program was definitely the best option for me. I'll complete my BSN in good time, on my employer's dime. About 1/3 of my class already has a bachelor's degree or higher in some other field.
  12. by   jonnygirl27
    My ADN program has a 95% pass rate and a 100% NCLEX pass rate for the last 5 years. I chose this program over the BSN programs because it has the HIGHEST pass rate in the state, and is generally considered to be an excellent program.
    I'm planning on getting my BSN through an RN to BSN program after graduation--only because I plan on being an instructor at some point and will need a masters for that... Know what I have to take to get my BSN? History, art, some business and management classes, and a few nursing theory classes. My ADN program has more clincal hours than any other nursing program--diploma, ADN or BSN--in my area.
    I can't really comment on diploma nurses since I don't know much about their programs--but if you take the same NCLEX, you're required to know just as much about nursing as any person with any other degree.
  13. by   KrisRNwannabe
    WOW!! this is one of those been there done it threads. let's not all jump on the poor girl. FYI for the poster: People pick there programs for many reasons. sometimes there are no BSN programs in the area, the cost (BSN=$$$), familt issues(ie I gotta work fast so they don't repo my house). my situation: I start my program in the fall. I already have a degree and a job that pays well. in order to become a nurse I will have to get my LPN first so that I can work while i am in the bridge program and also my employer will pay for the bridge program. the big thing with nursing is you get alot of mid 20's and above, career changes, and the like. lots of people at this stage in their life just can't do the BSN right away.

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