Why Not Just Do A Bsn Program??? - page 2

I'm sure that I am going to get ripped for this one but I am just curious. Whats the point of doing an ADN program? I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse? Considering the... Read More

  1. by   klone
    Quote from HU_nurse
    as far as their competency level, i never said that they WERENT as competent, I was just asking for opinions. Personally, I think they are...
    I mean, are you really going to be as competent as a BSN nurse?
    I'm sorry, I took that statement to mean you believe an ADN nurse can't POSSIBLY be as competent as a BSN nurse. After all, why would you think you were going to be "ripped a new one" if you weren't saying or implying that a BSN nurse is somehow *better* than an ADN nurse.
  2. by   HU_nurse
    Quote from klone
    Yes. The additional classes that a BSN must take are electives that have nothing to do with nursing, as well as nursing theory and leadership classes, which will not affect my ability to care for a patient. My clinical experience will be just as thorough as yours.



    Because that's one extra year that I would be in school instead of out in the field working. So while you're finishing up your BSN, I'm actually working and gaining hands-on, practical experience. So who will be the more experienced and competent nurse by the time *you* graduate?

    Furthermore, the ADN program is about 1/4 the cost as a BSN program at a university. There is a CC with an ADN program 10 miles from my house, whereas the closest school to offer a BSN program is 1 1/2 hours away. Also, once I'm working, I'll be able to do an RN->BSN program that will be paid for by my employer. Why pay out of pocket for something that my employer is willing to pay for as part of my work benefits?

    So that's why I am going for an ADN instead of a BSN.

    Makes a lot of sense actually. I didnt want to offend anyone. Your reasons seem to be very logical and I hope that works out for you. And as far as those extra leadership classes etc that I have to take, I think that will make me a more well rounded nurse. How does the pay differ for ADN nursesvs BSN nurses? Anyone know?
  3. by   HU_nurse
    Quote from klone
    I'm sorry, I took that statement to mean you believe an ADN nurse can't POSSIBLY be as competent as a BSN nurse. After all, why would you think you were going to be "ripped a new one" if you weren't saying or implying that a BSN nurse is somehow *better* than an ADN nurse.
    *smiles...nurses are a unique group of people. very defensive... I just had a feeling...
  4. by   lisamc1RN
    I agree with klone. It appeared, from your question, that there was doubt in your mind as to the competency level of an ADN.
  5. by   pama
    Sounds to me someone wants to start the Ivory Tower discussion AGAIN! The BSN is not for everyone, just as the ADN is not for everyone. Many non-tradional students, as well as students not as economically fortunate as others, cannot go for the BSN. It is just not possible.

    The NCLEX-RN is the final measure for all RN graduates, and if you look you will find ADN graduates out score BSN graduates on the NCLECX-RN. Plus, hospitals will tell you both are equally competent, and many ADN graduates hold higher competencies at graduation than their BSN conterparts.
  6. by   BamaGirlRN
    The pay does not differ where I live.
  7. by   klone
    Quote from HU_nurse
    Makes a lot of sense actually. I didnt want to offend anyone. Your reasons seem to be very logical and I hope that works out for you. And as far as those extra leadership classes etc that I have to take, I think that will make me a more well rounded nurse. How does the pay differ for ADN nursesvs BSN nurses? Anyone know?
    IMO, the leadership classes will not benefit you as a floor nurse, caring for patients. They will, however, benefit you if you want to go into nurse leadership. Not all RNs have higher goals beyond being a floor nurse. For those who do, the BSN is a good way to go. MANY MANY of us who are currently pursuing ADNs *DO* have plans to continue on with a BSN. But we're also not 22 anymore. We're married and have children to support. For us, that extra 1-2 years in school when we could be earning a paycheck *is* a big deal.

    There is no pay difference where I am between an ADN and a BSN. We're all RNs, with RN pay.
  8. by   GracefulRN
    OK, here's my $.02,
    I think that, and this is JMO, most of the people who do the ADN route are really interested in bedside nursing as an RN, because basically there is NO difference between an ADN and BSN prepared nurse with regard to bedside competence. The decision for getting an ADN vs. BSN is usually made by assesing your long term goals are and what your personal finances are. If you intend on getting an advanced degree in nursing it usually makes more sense to get your BSN, because: you'll need a bachelors (although not necessarily in nursing) to get into the program and in the long run it will cost you less. The only reason that someone who wants an advanced degree would get an ADN first, again JMO, is that either they didn't realize that they wanted to specialize or their financial situation at the time wouldn't let them do the BSN right off the bat.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Because not everyone's got the money for 4-5 years of school.
  10. by   Kabin
    From what I gathered, nursing pay works under unusual rules (socialistic?) from other professions. From what I've been told/read in these forums, BSN grads start off at about the same pay without taking into account many pertinent factors. And frankly, that's something that doesn't happen in many other employment fields.

    In almost any other field, graduates are rewarded for: better academics, better attended schools, more difficult degrees, more challenging course loads, etc. It may be part of what is wrong with nursing today. Where is the incentive for new nursing students to acheive higher goals?
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    No pay difference here either.

    steph
  12. by   klone
    Quote from Kabin
    From what I gathered, nursing pay works under unusual rules (socialistic?) from other professions. From what I've been told/read in these forums, BSN grads start off at about the same pay without taking into account many pertinent factors. And frankly, that's something that doesn't happen in many other employment fields.

    In almost any other field, graduates are rewarded for: better academics, better attended schools, more difficult degrees, more challenging course loads, etc. It may be part of what is wrong with nursing today. Where is the incentive for new nursing students to acheive higher goals?
    I don't agree that this is that uncommon. In most fields where there is a set pay scale (such as with the government), you start out at the lowest end of the pay scale when you're first hired, regardless of where you went to school, what your school grades were, etc. You just need to have the minimum qualifications in order to be eligible for the job. Having worked in the government for a good part of my life, this is not unusual to me.
  13. by   TLC RN
    There is a gazillion threads that will answer all your questions...but one thing I would like to point out...

    Where I live tuition alone for a ADN program for the 75 credit program you need would be about $4,000. For 75 of you 120 or more credits you need for a BSN...$18,750.

    As for it only taking two years to finish the ADN program: The program was designed to be completed in two years but I think becuase there are so many people that want to go to nursing school, many schools make their students take their pre-reqs before starting the nursing courses. So right now, it takes about 3 years to finish the ADN program. At least where I live.

close