Why many new grads don't find jobs.... - page 6

by MN-Nurse 22,390 Views | 93 Comments

While eating breakfast at a local diner in my scrubs, my waitress was excited to share the news that she, "finished my CNA clinicals yesterday!!" "Great! How was it?" I asked. She starts nursing school soon. "Depressing,"... Read More


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    Indeed there are CNA clinicals. I did them in a Nursing home, and learned so much about being a nurse.

    We just hired 14 new grads this year. (I know the number exactly because I will be orienting them on June 1.) We are actually super excited about these Nurses and hope they will want to stay with us for a long time. It may not seem like a lot, but we are a 122 bed hospital...

    Some of them have experience at our hospital- we like this because we have an idea of how people will work in the culture and also if they are able to get to work on time etc. Some don't have any experience, but seemed like a good fit. We put the no exp people with very very strong committed preceptors and cross our fingers a bit...

    If you are going to take a job at a hospital with an eye on getting a position there, you really have to keep your eye on the prize 100% of the time. No "No show no call" days, No being late. No patient complaints, No staff complaints, and you should never make negative statements. It can go for you or against you.
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    It really makes a difference who you know does matter more than what you know! Sad to say but that is the reality in life no matter what business or job you seek! This puts the shy introverted person at a great disadvantage and the outgoing popular attractive person at a great advantage in school, work and life! I think its true that the attractive "photogenic" outgoing person can get by on their looks and personality and don't have to study or work as hard as the rest of the pack!
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    You can often obtain a certificate from your nursing school after your first semester of nursing classes with clinicals and then take the state exam and skills to get yur CNA certificate. This is how NY state does it. ANd yes there is a clinial component to the CNA course. NY mandates a certain number of hours.
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    You know what made me sad about this thread? How the lady in the post lamented about the "poor" folks at the nursing home with no socks, and how that is what made her NOT want to work in a nursing home, and go somewhere else that was less sad, easier work, more money, etc.,etc. What saddens me is that she didn't want to go into the trenches and be the person who made a difference. The people who are truly happy, truly effective in nursing are the ones who go in each day, determined to make a difference.
    bethanygreene, Irinauer, anie10, and 3 others like this.
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    I have the same issue. I would love to work as a CNA/PCA, but it would mean cutting my current pay almost in half. Since my living expenses are not being subsidized by my parents/huband etc, I simply cannot afford to live on that paycheck. I have been trying to find volunteer opportunities in the local hospitals, but even those are difficult to obtain if you don't know someone.
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    It took me over a year to land a CNA job at a rehab hospital while I was in nursing school. The tough part was being able to do 2-3 weeks of orientation full time during a day shift, which is impossible while in school. Thankfully the minute I passed the NCLEX, they were able to promote me to an RN position. The experience I received as a CNA was fantastic and gave me a better understanding of what I was learning in school as well as propelling me into a nursing career.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
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    Quote from country mom
    You know what made me sad about this thread? How the lady in the post lamented about the "poor" folks at the nursing home with no socks, and how that is what made her NOT want to work in a nursing home, and go somewhere else that was less sad, easier work, more money, etc.,etc. What saddens me is that she didn't want to go into the trenches and be the person who made a difference. The people who are truly happy, truly effective in nursing are the ones who go in each day, determined to make a difference.
    Your post moved me My mom had to be moved from our local Alzheimer's Unit to one 6 hours away due to times of anxiety and aggressive behavior. The Unit had to hire traveling CNA's (who make more than RN's) to do one-on-one care for her. They were awesome. But too expensive so she had to move.

    The new place is for patients who have a higher level of care needed - there are 3 patients for each CNA and the CNA's run all day long. The sad thing is, you can't keep an eye on 3 high aquity patient's all the time and my mom fell and broke her hip a couple of weeks ago. I made sure to thank each CNA the day I visited as they do a difficult and awesome job. I sat in the cafeteria and watched them interact with the patients and was impressed. Working in geriatrics is honorable work but very hard. Especially with dementia patients.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
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    I just wanted to input my two cents here. I did not want to be a CNA, personally. I didn't think it could fit into my life while I was in nursing school. I know that they would be flexible with hours, but I also know me and I knew I would pick up extra shifts and work more than I should. I also just wanted to take a different path than EVERYBODY else. I felt as though EVERYONE was a CNA and I wanted to stand out. I worked at a Girl Scout Camp for a summer as a health supervisor. I worked under the supervision of an RN who came to visit the site occasionally. I would dispense meds throughout the day, take care of first aid and oversee the general health and well-being of the girls. After that summer, I worked at a rehab facility for people who had TBIs. I dispensed meds, was included in their overall plan of care and learned a lot.

    Right after I passed my NCLEX, I got a great job as a public health nurse and I think that my experience really helped. I think it can be very rewarding to take the road less traveled
    Irinauer and PatMac10,RN like this.
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    Quote from buckeyepaige
    I have the same issue. I would love to work as a CNA/PCA, but it would mean cutting my current pay almost in half. Since my living expenses are not being subsidized by my parents/huband etc, I simply cannot afford to live on that paycheck. I have been trying to find volunteer opportunities in the local hospitals, but even those are difficult to obtain if you don't know someone.
    I think CNAs make about 1/4th of what I make now and I'm using my current paycheck to save up for nursing school. I've been eyeing the CNA course at the local community college just to get the experience (it isn't required for the nursing schools) but the schedule always conflicts with my pre-req classes. I work 40-50 hours/week and go to school. I was thinking I could go part time at my job and work part time as a CNA to reduce the hit in pay but we'll see if that can happen eventually.

    I am hoping my experience at my current job will help me a little. I've been in the same job for 14 years now and have a variety of IT experience. No practical healthcare assistance though. Once I'm in nursing school, I do hope to see if I can get a part time job though.
  10. 1
    Quote from buckeyepaige
    I have the same issue. I would love to work as a CNA/PCA, but it would mean cutting my current pay almost in half. Since my living expenses are not being subsidized by my parents/huband etc, I simply cannot afford to live on that paycheck. I have been trying to find volunteer opportunities in the local hospitals, but even those are difficult to obtain if you don't know someone.
    I really think you should cut yourself some slack about working as a CNA/PCA. While I think there is nothing wrong with it - it also isn't necessary to be a good nurse.

    Maybe all nursing schools don't work the same way - but when I went to school we learned basic patient care info first - how to make beds, how to transfer patients (we used gait belts), giving bed baths, doing vital signs, etc.

    I came at this second career in my late 30's with no medical experience at all. Most of the RN's I work with had no CNA experience either. And they are fine nurses.

    I guess I just want to make sure that folks realize that unless your school requires a CNA Certificate prior to nursing school, it's ok not to be a CNA first.

    It's also ok to do it if you want.

    But being a CNA first is no guarantee that you'll be a good nurse. That has more to do with what kind of person you are, how you view teamwork, what your goals are. It also doesn't guarantee you will get a job.

    edited to add . . .if this adds another layer of stress to your family life, I'd definitely opt out . . which is what my mentor warned me about. Going back to school when you have a family (and a job) is tough. I focused on becoming an RN.
    Wild Irish LPN likes this.


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