Why many new grads don't find jobs.... - page 6

While eating breakfast at a local diner in my scrubs, my waitress was excited to share the news that she, "finished my CNA clinicals yesterday!!" "Great! How was it?" I asked. She starts nursing... Read More

  1. Visit  yooper13} profile page
    1
    I concur...I had NO healthcare experience going into school. I quit my (office) job a year ago to start my full-time program. In the middle of my 3rd semester, I got a job as a sitter at a local hospital. Did that for only 2 months, then applied for an extern position at same hospital. Started that last week...I am hoping that the experience I am getting with that will help me get a position after I graduate in August (tho I know there are no guarantees). BTW I did not know anyone in the hospital...just started at the bottom! WORK, STUDENTS!!!
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
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  3. Visit  paigekc} profile page
    0
    Thank you for all your advice! I will definitely look in to CNA classes at Red Cross and the nursing homes around here.

    Also thank you for telling me how to post a thread, it's been bothering me because I haven't been able to figure it out. haha.
  4. Visit  paigekc} profile page
    0
    I completely understand what you mean. I am in the same position. Recently had to look for a second job just so I can cover my bills and also up to my knees in student loans. I just keep telling myself it's worth all the hard work and one day I will be exactly where I want to be. It's hardwork, but with it, I believe comes a great reward. Keep it up, day by day, good luck in everything you do!
  5. Visit  kylee_adns} profile page
    0
    I did not have a healthcare job while going to school. I graduated from an ADN program last December and have had no problems landing a job with no healthcare experience. I started first in a LTC facility, and now work in a step-down unit in a hospital. I wish I did have the CNA experience of many of my peers while in school and now. At times I am awkward at doing simple things, and it takes me a minute to think about how I can accomplish what I am trying to do. I also encountered many aides during my clinicals that were rude if I had simple questions about things like how the equipment worked etc. I do not really think that this type of condescending attitude is appropriate.

    Although I did not work in the medical field, I tried to make the most the opportunities at my place of employment. I worked at a distribution center loading trucks, but joined the Severe Injury Response team to try to get any little "experience" that I could. It afforded me the ability to work two days a week while still being able to pay my mortgage. Working as a CNA would not have allowed me this amount of flexibility and pay. I guess that was a risk I had to take, and I was worried about it the whole time I went to school. I even told my husband that we might have to move when I graduated, if I had trouble gaining employment as a RN in our area. Luckily, we are able to stay in the same city, and I have a 10 minute commute to work. There are so many different aspects of nursing, and any life experience is valuable when working with people of all walks of life.
  6. Visit  windowrn} profile page
    0
    Quote from IEDave
    Other than possibly cost, I'd love to hear your rationale for this one.

    The reason that experienced people (or, "connected" people) are hired over others tends to boil down to one main reason - risk. There's less risk in hiring Uncle Bob's second cousin on Aunt Elsie Mae's side than a total stranger - even when someone comes along with excellent credentials. And, I've been passed over several times for positions for that very reason alone. Likewise, someone with a proven, verifiable track record in a given field will be a better risk than someone just starting out.

    Does that mean there's no hope for a new grad? Nope - sometimes you can get the gravy jobs even with everything stacked against you, depending on circumstances. That said - don't be too quick to turn your nose up at less "desirable" opportunities - typically, what you'll tend to find is that the less "risk-averse" organizations tend to pay less, or are more toxic workplaces. However, they will give a new grad a chance to prove themselves - which, when you're starting out is really what you need more than anything else.

    ----- Dave
    Specifically you don't have to work as a CNA to have connections in the hospital. Nurses who work on the floor are a great source of potential help to employment. I absolutely agree that, at least in my area, getting a job as a new grad can be difficult. It is all about connections and those don't have to be a result of working as a CNA.

    I highly recommend participating in a precepted semester if at all possible. Working one on one with a nurse with the ability to show off your critical thinking skills over the course of 150+ hours is worth a great deal in terms of giving a nurse manager a look at your potential ability to transition from student to nurse. Certainly showing up and doing the job of a CNA as delegated on a unit over time will get you knowledge of the staff, and manager.

    I recommend making connections with the nurses you work with during clinicals. Critical thinking, excellent clinical skills combined with connections made in a precepted position are definitely a combination well worth looking at as opposed to a CNA.
  7. Visit  gummi bear} profile page
    1
    There are a lot of young women in my classes right now that say that they do not want to work as a CNA because the work is "too hard, too dirty, not enough pay, has nothing to do with being a nurse, beneath them, etc". Although some people don't want to take a pay cut, or they just don't want to work while they are in school, I'm seeing a lot of girls thinking that they can become a nurse while avoiding "CNA work". I don't know where they plan on working because in my hospital everyone works together. Especially since there's often 2-0 CNAs on the unit with 8-14 nurses during a shift, and there's no time to be picky about getting the job done.
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  8. Visit  ArrowRN} profile page
    1
    Quote from gummi bear
    There are a lot of young women in my classes right now that say that they do not want to work as a CNA because the work is "too hard, too dirty, not enough pay, has nothing to do with being a nurse, beneath them, etc". Although some people don't want to take a pay cut, or they just don't want to work while they are in school, I'm seeing a lot of girls thinking that they can become a nurse while avoiding "CNA work". I don't know where they plan on working because in my hospital everyone works together. Especially since there's often 2-0 CNAs on the unit with 8-14 nurses during a shift, and there's no time to be picky about getting the job done.
    my wife just started on her CNA first job still in first week training and there was this patient who wanted to use the bathroom, she told the nurse who was right there at the time and the nurse went running around trying to find a CNA...finally she came upon mywife and another trainee CNA and by the time they got there the lady had already pooped and ****** on herself. The DON showed up and told the 2 trainees, my wife and the other girl, to clean it up. Now all logic would say the nurse could have helped the lady to the bathroom and all that would have been avoided, but like I told my wife, some nurses will just be a..."that not my job" nurse and she has all rights to say no, while others will just do what best for the patient. We can even argue as to why the floor CNA was not at their post. Needless to say the lady started to cry due to the shame and embarrasment. I feel sorry for new nursing students who think a certain job is "beneath them"...if that was their mom or their sister how would they want them to be treated?
    Last edit by ArrowRN on May 24, '12
    PatMac10,RN likes this.
  9. Visit  aea_11} profile page
    2
    Quote from gummi bear
    There are a lot of young women in my classes right now that say that they do not want to work as a CNA because the work is "too hard, too dirty, not enough pay, has nothing to do with being a nurse, beneath them, etc". .
    I would completely disgree. Being a nurse is providing holistic, and patient centered care. Providing care is not just administering medications, hanging ivs, but also it means to turn them, assisting them to the bathroom, etc.

    NOT all hospitals have CNAs. and if you are a nurse, and you think getting your hands dirty is beyond your scope, think again, because you cant always delegate tasks to the CNA, how are you supposed to assess their bodily fluids or skin if you aren't the ones changing them atleast once on your shift.

    That's why I believe its an asset to become a CNA prior to getting your license, it truly shows someone's ability to care for the patient.. even if it may seem "dirty". Because someone has to do it.


    Furthermore, Nurse directors and nurse managers want a new grad who is the "whole package". I have gone to 3 interviews and each have asked me my experience in the hospital setting besides clinicals. They want someone who can balance both school and work, this shows commitment and someone who can multitask, prioritize and organize. Being a CNA or a healthcare worker proves you went above and beyond-- and provides some sort of experience. As a CNA you are interacting with patients, improving communication skills, as well as being team player. Most importantly, it shows you can work independently, unlike in clinicals where you are supervised by your clinical instructor or another nurse.
    Last edit by aea_11 on May 24, '12
    Irinauer and PatMac10,RN like this.
  10. Visit  grownuprosie} profile page
    0
    Quote from man-nurse2b
    my wife just started on her CNA first job still in first week training and there was this patient who wanted to use the bathroom, she told the nurse who was right there at the time and the nurse went running around trying to find a CNA...finally she came upon mywife and another trainee CNA and by the time they got there the lady had already pooped and ****** on herself. The DON showed up and told the 2 trainees, my wife and the other girl, to clean it up. Now all logic would say the nurse could have helped the lady to the bathroom and all that would have been avoided, but like I told my wife, some nurses will just be a..."that not my job" nurse and she has all rights to say no, while others will just do what best for the patient. We can even argue as to why the floor CNA was not at their post. Needless to say the lady started to cry due to the shame and embarrasment. I feel sorry for new nursing students who think a certain job is "beneath them"...if that was their mom or their sister how would they want them to be treated?

    Logic would say
    that your wife should have taken the woman to the bathroom or at the least gotten a bed pan if for whatever reason she was not allowed to ambulate pt's yet. She went to CNA school. She knows how to help, but refused? Yeah,the nurse could have helped. However, if two able bodied, available, certified nursing assistants were available to... well, I don't know... assist me, the nurse (Student ATM), I would probably expect them to do it. Why does it sound like you are surprised that they were asked to clean up afterwards? Sorry, dude, but this is not the nurses fault.
  11. Visit  ArrowRN} profile page
    1
    nope u misunderstand me,the problem is not whose job it is, and my wife was no where close by to there and did not refuse anything the CNA trainess was on a totally different floors getting first days work orientation,on what is where, rule of the place etc etc. that's where the NURSE who refued to help a lady used the bathroom, left the patient, and found the trainee CNAs. my wife is a new CNA grad just getting her first job after looking for over 2 years. So if a new CNA could jump out of class and know everything without being oriented, kudos to you, but even that is not the problem...The problem is how the patient was treated, you missing the bigger picture...here. Anyways, When I am that nurse my choice would be to just take the lady to the bathroom,and be done with it, not refuse and run around like a fool calling out for a CNA. Being nice for 2 minutes isnt going to ruin ones status as a nurse...anyways thats just me.
    Last edit by ArrowRN on May 24, '12
    TAWBSNRN likes this.
  12. Visit  brandy1017} profile page
    0
    Quote from country mom
    You know what made me sad about this thread? How the lady in the post lamented about the "poor" folks at the nursing home with no socks, and how that is what made her NOT want to work in a nursing home, and go somewhere else that was less sad, easier work, more money, etc.,etc. What saddens me is that she didn't want to go into the trenches and be the person who made a difference. The people who are truly happy, truly effective in nursing are the ones who go in each day, determined to make a difference.
    A patient told me that Salvation Army came to the nursing home at Christmas and gave everyone gifts including slipper socks among the small practical gifts. I was surprised and didn't know Salvation Army helped in nursing homes too. That is beautiful! Has anyone else heard of this or other organizations volunteering in nursing homes?
  13. Visit  DarkLotus} profile page
    0
    This has been an interesting thread! I have been a CNA for 1.5 years and have worked in LTC and Home Health. However I do not plan on working as one when I start a BSN program this fall. I simply can not afford to put my kids in daycare for a full time school and a part time job! I will only have two days a week without school with five hours of time that my kids will be in daycare. Any daycare above the states definition of full time hours I have to pay for out of pocket instead of with a grant. I'm not even sure I will be able to afford the BSN program I have been accepted into so I might wind up working as a CNA for yet another year. If I do get enough grants and scholarships to afford to not work and go to school, I hope to volunteer one day a week at a hospital my first term which I dream will lead to a flexible shift as a nurse tech the next them. I do plan on working full time as a CNA or a tech over the summer even if it is in LTC. Although I dream of eventually working in L&D or Trauma, I'll be happy anywhere that I can obtain professional socialization and learn the non academic side of nursing.
  14. Visit  jennifer.ellerbach} profile page
    0
    Quote from MN-Nurse

    I nodded, "Yes, it can be hard, but you really do learn a lot. I wouldn't have my med surg job today if I hadn't started in a nursing home."


    "Yeah....but that's kind of like winning the 'CNA with no experience' lottery,"Students, get to work. I know other jobs pay more, but if you really liked those jobs, you would not be going to nursing school.
    I am a junior in nursing school right now. I am a nursing psychology double major. Being a double major means I am super busy all the time and am in school year around. As much as I know that I should try to get a job as a CNA, I just don't have the time if I want to continue making good grades.


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