Why is it that prereqs are so minimal for some programs? | allnurses

Why is it that prereqs are so minimal for some programs?

  1. 0 Hi folks, new guy on the boards (felt it necessary to specify my sex)

    I just graduated with a BA in Philosophy this past May and have decided to pursue a nursing education, and i'm in a bit of a hurry to get the ball rolling for the January semester as I know I will need to spend at least one semester (or possible more than one) on prerequisite courses before entering into any program.
    My question pertains to prereq requirements for the various Associate's degree programs: why is that for some I would only need 1 chem OR bio OR phys and anatomy, whereas for others I need 10 (over two semesters worth) of courses? The programs with minimal requirements, such as the one linked below, are attractive to me; I would really like to begin my practical nursing experience in two and a half years rather than in four. But I am interested in learning about the quality of the program, given that the prerequisites are so minimal. The one in particular that i'm looking at is NLNAC accredited:

    (http://www.baystate.edu/programs/on-...iates/nursing/)

    How does it appear to you?
  2. Visit  victormansella profile page

    About victormansella

    Joined Dec '12; Posts: 8.

    16 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    0
    I'm confused...it looks like that program requires the typical non-nursing courses...a&p, microbiology, statistics, etc. it just looks like you have the option to take some of those courses along with your nursing courses. Lots of schools give that option, but sometimes how many courses you've completed plays a part in their selection process. Also, the nursing course load is so heavy on its own, I'd recommend taking as many of those courses beforehand as possible.
  4. Visit  victormansella profile page
    0
    I see. Yeah, after reviewing the program, it appears that most of the prereq's are included there. This seems like a waste of money because I could just take all 7 or 8 of them at a community college for less than 4k.

    Here is my other consideration...it will take two semesters of preparation before I can apply, but it might be a smarter choice:

    Nursing - Accelerated, BS - University of Massachusetts Boston
    The complete program is 28k as opposed to the 57k for the above associates. So between the prereqs and this program I would have a BSN for around 32k...does that sound more reasonable?
  5. Visit  HeyYogaGirl profile page
    0
    Hey new guy

    So, pre-req-wise I think different programs require different courses because some offer those courses in the program and thus don't need you to take them before (i.e., my program doesn't require pharm bc we take it first semester). However that is just a guess for your specific school. Maybe you could email or call their admissions department and ask them. It's worth a call or two before you commit yourself to a semester.

    When I was just starting I tried to sign up for courses that every school I was looking at wanted, to make sure not to limit myself and give myself more time to decide.

    Also, a big thing you want to look into with nursing school is their accreditation. There are like two different ones that are pretty well respected (you'll have to look it up, can't remember off the top of my head). You don't want to waste time and money to find out the hospital you want to work for doesn't accept your degree!!

    Btw have you looked into accelerated programs? I have a bachelors too and am doing an accelerated bsn program that is only 12 months. There were 10 pre-reqs tho but overall it's a bsn in like 2 years. There are also three year accelerated Master's of nursing programs for people with bachelors other than in nursing but I wouldn't recommend that for everyone.

    Good luck!
  6. Visit  HeyYogaGirl profile page
    0
    Looks like you are looking at absn programs! I think they're a really smart choice, do check accreditation though!
  7. Visit  victormansella profile page
    0
    Much thanks for the detailed response yogagirl!
    I believe the two accreditation organizations you mention are NLNAC and CCNE. The UMass Boston program I'm considering is accredited by CCNE and appears to be the most cost effective route I can take. The application deadline for 2014 is November 1st...if I begin at my community college now, does it sound like i'd have enough time to complete the 6 prereqs: A&P 1 and 2 with labs, Microbiology with lab, statistics, growth and development through lifespan, and nutrition ? I would have to complete these over spring and summer semesters...does that sound doable?

    Thanks again!
  8. Visit  x_factor profile page
    0
    Quote from victormansella
    Much thanks for the detailed response yogagirl!
    I believe the two accreditation organizations you mention are NLNAC and CCNE. The UMass Boston program I'm considering is accredited by CCNE and appears to be the most cost effective route I can take. The application deadline for 2014 is November 1st...if I begin at my community college now, does it sound like i'd have enough time to complete the 6 prereqs: A&P 1 and 2 with labs, Microbiology with lab, statistics, growth and development through lifespan, and nutrition ? I would have to complete these over spring and summer semesters...does that sound doable?

    Thanks again!
    Very do-able if you have the time to devote to it (if you don't work full-time, have children, ect.). You can take A&P 1, statistics, growth and development, and nutrition in the spring. Growth/Devlopment and Nutrition are both fairly easy classes, and you should be fine taking them with A&P 1 and Statistics.

    You can take A&P 2 and Micro over the summer. Hard, fast paced, and a ton of material. But if you are strong in the sciences and dedicate a lot of time to studying, you can pull off a good grade. Many people here have done both together in the summer and got A's in both. I'll be taking A&P 2 and Micro in the summer as well.
  9. Visit  victormansella profile page
    0
    Thanks x_factor, this is coming together quite quickly and your input is very encouraging. Does anyone happen to know if it is possible to get government loans even after completing my bachelor's degree, or is it more likely that I will have to take out private loans for these prerequisite courses? Both myself and my mother (with whom I live) are unemployed and have next to 0 income. I'm hoping to avoid taking out private loans but I will if there is no other way.
  10. Visit  PennyS profile page
    0
    Quote from victormansella
    Thanks x_factor, this is coming together quite quickly and your input is very encouraging. Does anyone happen to know if it is possible to get government loans even after completing my bachelor's degree, or is it more likely that I will have to take out private loans for these prerequisite courses? Both myself and my mother (with whom I live) are unemployed and have next to 0 income. I'm hoping to avoid taking out private loans but I will if there is no other way.
    That will depend on whether you have undergrad loans that were financed thru the federal program -I.e. Stafford. There are limits on the total amount you can borrow and if you reached those limits during your 1st undergrad, then you will have to look into other options. I cannot recall the exact max amount.

    Also- you may already be aware of this but you will need to take TEAS now for UMass.
  11. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    0
    Quote from victormansella
    Thanks x_factor, this is coming together quite quickly and your input is very encouraging. Does anyone happen to know if it is possible to get government loans even after completing my bachelor's degree, or is it more likely that I will have to take out private loans for these prerequisite courses? Both myself and my mother (with whom I live) are unemployed and have next to 0 income. I'm hoping to avoid taking out private loans but I will if there is no other way.
    For fed loans there's a 150% cap. Meaning if you're looking at a bachelors degree that requires 120 credits to graduate you should definitely qualify for loans if you have less than 180 hours. At community colleges you'd have to have less than 90 credit hours. It doesn't matter if you received aid for those hours or not. The intent is just to keep from financing long-term students.

    Some people squeak through and get them longer but the govt has been cracking down on it recently, so I'd prepare for the worst and hope for the best! Also there's an appeals process if you are denied that some people have success with.
  12. Visit  victormansella profile page
    0
    Thanks guys, you've answered all that you could in ignorance of my particular circumstances. I'll need to go sit and speak with a financial aid person now and see what my options are. I'll keep you all posted and once again, thanks for being an invaluable resource!
  13. Visit  meeep profile page
    0
    Lifetime undergrad federal loan limit is 57,500 iirc.
  14. Visit  victormansella profile page
    0
    Really? Does that include the Pell Grant? So far i've borrowed 13k, so I should have no problem borrowing more then? I remember that i'm eligible for the maximum amount because of my/my family's circumstances. I was under the impression though, that once one graduates from a BA program, one can't borrow from gov't student loans anymore (only private)...I think I was told this when I tried to go back for one class over the summer.


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