Why Do Nursing Instructors Rely So Heavily On PowerPoints To Teach? - page 12

by SarahMaria

12,101 Views | 121 Comments

I have completed 3 semesters of Nursing School and so far, every lecture instructor has used PowerPoints in the classroom to teach. This method has been used probably 99% of the time. The PowerPoints are provided ahead of time... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from ERNURSEDAD
    <snip>While I am always interested in constructive feedback, I find it incredibly interesting how students are amazing critics of the teaching methods of nursing educators. Unless a nursing student themselves has been an educator before, I would challenge that person with the question, "What makes you, the novice to my field of expertise, able to judge what methods are the best to convey what I know that YOU need to know to get where you want to go?" Certainly, nursing instructors like anyone else in life exist on a spectrum: a handful are AMAZING and a handful really SUCK (and shouldn't be doing it), most however, land somewhere in the middle. Students often fail to recognize or own their part in the learning process. Many students often have too much going on in their lives (work, family responsibilities, etc). Then when things don't go well academically, it's the fault of the instructor's power points, or the hard exams, etc. When a class does poorly on an exam, I look at the top performers in the class and see how they did. If there are still A's on what the statistics say is a "difficult exam", that means the content still got through. Students may not like that particular instructor's style. Or if that instructor is known to be "hard"; some students won't ever give that instructor the opportunity to be a "good instructor". I would also challenge students to use your voices. By that I mean...if you are not getting what you need...be assertive and let your faculty know what it is you need to understand content and/or be more successful. NO...this does not mean us feeding you answers. But there are several times a semester where a student or group of students approach me with a proposal and I'm willing to re-do something, alter a due date or go over something again simply because I have been presented with an angle I had not previously considered. We are experienced nurses and educators (for the most part), we are NOT mind readers, folks!

    Great thread. But no surprise...nurses are excellent critical thinkers who ask the good and right questions!

    ERNURSEDAD/Runningstork
    Nursing faculty in Chicago
    I've never pretended that I'm an educator....what I am though is a student. I have a lot of experience being a student, I've done it for years. I'm proactive in my learning, and know how I learn most efficiently.

    This experience allows me to judge whether a professor is efficient in teaching me.

    For me, proper lectures (reading from the PowerPoint doesn't count) is very effective. Skits, games and class discussions....not so much.

    Either way, I'll figure out a way to learn what I need to learn...but it's always helpful when the Prof spends more time teaching and less entertaining.
    countryhick likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from cxg174
    As for preparation to teach- as long as you have more education that those you are teaching you are technically qualified- RN to teach LPNS, BSN to teach ADN, MSN to teach BSN. I don't know of any programs in my area that do not require at least an MSN or PhD to teach nursing, but there may be shortage areas that do accept less. I would imagine that those instructors are also going back to school though.
    So how what are the qualifications to teach post-doctoral students? lol
    ashleyisawesome likes this.
  3. 0
    Others who already have achieved the degree and who are actively involved with research and publishing making them leaders in their fields. Postdoctoral students are working on research in a particular field, they may be independent or with more advanced researchers who guide them. It is not really the same as a degree-earning program.
    Last edit by nursemarion on Dec 27, '10
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    I graduated last year as a lpn , and felt it was pure laziness.I can read the material myself, I want a instructor who really teachs, thank goodness real teachers dont teach like this.
    Last edit by TERRYKOZ on Dec 27, '10 : Reason: mispelling
  5. 0
    Quote from cxg174
    Others who already have achieved the degree and who are actively involved with research and publishing making them leaders in their fields. Postdoctoral students are working on research in a particular field, they may be independent or with more advanced researchers who guide them. It is not really the same as a degree-earning program.
    I know. I just had to bring it up.
  6. 0
    Actually, it is not our job. The instructor facilitates, but the student is responsible for the learning. Alarmingly, many students have the attitude that it is our job, and those students often do not do well because they do not take responsibility for their own learning.
  7. 0
    I so agree with you. Many students are reluctant to take responsibility for their own learning and blame anyone but themselves when they dont do well. These students are really difficult to help, because they expect someone other than themselves to do the work of learning.
  8. 1
    Quote from countryhick
    Actually, it is not our job. The instructor facilitates, but the student is responsible for the learning. Alarmingly, many students have the attitude that it is our job, and those students often do not do well because they do not take responsibility for their own learning.
    Are you saying it isn't your job to teach?
    ashleyisawesome likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from countryhick
    Actually, it is not our job. The instructor facilitates, but the student is responsible for the learning. Alarmingly, many students have the attitude that it is our job, and those students often do not do well because they do not take responsibility for their own learning.
    So the Professor has no responsibility regarding the quality of their performance?

    I agree the student is responsible for their learning....but surely the Professor is also responsible for teaching?

    A student ultimately responsible for their learning shouldn't necessarily mean self-taught.
  10. 0
    Quote from CuriousMe
    So the Professor has no responsibility regarding the quality of their performance?

    I agree the student is responsible for their learning....but surely the Professor is also responsible for teaching?

    A student ultimately responsible for their learning shouldn't necessarily mean self-taught.
    Of course not. Their sole purpose is to sit around on their butts, drinking coffee and offering criticism while waiting on their next paycheck.


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