Why are you REALLY going into nursing? Honest answers please. - page 16

Ok, I'm a bit frustrated with all of these posts telling us that we shouldn't go into nursing because we need a job and steady income. Sure, I do like to help people, but I need a steady job even... Read More

  1. by   finally
    Best of luck to you I think once you have some more clinical experience you'll realize if its right for you, and where you want to be....but in my own opinion(you know everyone has one) I think you'll realize you need to have a little more heart into it if your gonna last....Not that you need to be the next Florence...but you'll see....
    Quote from lizz
    No offense taken. Obviously, since I'm a student, I have no idea what area of nursing will be my "style" until I start working. Eventually, I'd like to work agency in a variety of jobs, so I could figure that out.

  2. by   Truly_Blessed
    Just because a person wants job security and a paycheck....does not mean they will make horrid nurses. Nor do their priorities have to be in the same order as what someone else thinks they should be. If someone says, hey I want to earn a living for my family first and foremost, I don't see anything wrong with that.
    Last edit by Truly_Blessed on Jun 11, '04
  3. by   Tweety
    To be honest I went into nursing not knowing what the pay rate was or that there was a shortage. I was living in a world all of my own back then. I sincerely wanted to be a nurse to help sick people.

    Now why do I stay a nurse with all it's stress and problems? That's a different question than why I went into nursing. I stay mainly because it's a nice middle income that I've built my life around, also it has security, and I'm not qualified to do anything else that is going to pay me what I get as a nurse. So in many ways I stay because of the money.

    But I still enjoy helping sick people.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from Truly_Blessed
    Just because a person wants a job security and a paycheck....does not mean they will make horrid nurses.
    I agree. (which is all I want to say but it's too short of a message so this is just filler. )
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from finally
    I think you'll realize you need to have a little more heart into it if your gonna last....Not that you need to be the next Florence...but you'll see....
    And what makes you think I don't have enough "heart into it"? You have no right to judge me, especially when you don't know me.

    This is what really annoys me. Just because I'm honest about needing a steady job, doesn't mean I don't care about people.

    I don't go on and on about caring because, quite frankly, I sometimes think it's disingenuous. There is no way I would go through the hell that is school if there wasn't a steady job at the end of the road. I need to pay bills, just like anybody else.

    But, at the same time, that doesn't mean I don't care about people. If anything, I'll be able to care for others more because I won't have to worry about taking care of myself.

    :angryfire
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 11, '04
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from lizz
    And what makes you think I don't have enough "heart into it"? You have no right to judge me, especially when you don't know me.

    This is what really annoys me. Just because I'm honest about needing a steady job, doesn't mean I don't care about people.

    I don't go on and on about caring because, quite frankly, I sometimes think it's disingenuous. There is no way I would go through the hell that is school if there wasn't a steady job at the end of the road. I need to pay bills, just like anybody else.

    But, at the same time, that doesn't mean I don't care about people. If anything, I'll be able to care for others more because I won't have to worry about taking care of myself.

    :angryfire
    I agree lizz. Can't it be both . Can't someone be in nursing because it's a livable income and they care?

    I agree, why put yourself through the hell of nursing school and the hell of day to day life as a nurse if you they paid minimum wage?

    But as a seasoned nurse, I can see Finally's point. There's a lot more to nursing than collecting a paycheck. Sometimes all the money in the world isn't worth the burnout, you have to have that compassionate edge to keep you going and in order to take care of patients holistically.
  7. by   Sheri257
    Quote from 3rdShiftGuy
    But as a seasoned nurse, I can see Finally's point. There's a lot more to nursing than collecting a paycheck. Sometimes all the money in the world isn't worth the burnout, you have to have that compassionate edge to keep you going and in order to take care of patients holistically.
    Well, hopefully, I have that compassionate edge as well. Obviously I won't know for sure until I actually become a nurse. Therefore, I don't go around making claims that I'll be this or that, and it would be nice if people would refrain from making judgements about what kind of nurse I will be, when I'm not even a nurse yet.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 11, '04
  8. by   peachyintenn
    I really think, that as in life, there is a balance.. Some people have or show more compassion than others, some people have a nick for saying all the right things, as some people are blunt as hell, and that is great too. If every nurse that came into my room, with me deathly ill, with sugary sweetness everytime, it would make my stay boring. When a nurse that is only doing her job came in, that would give me comfort, as would the compassionate nurse..

    Look, I am just starting out too, like the pre-reqs.. but give the girl a break, at least she made it through school and still wants to be a nurse.. I thought nurses united.. Lord knows, we should.. we are needed, wanted, and loved (secretly), but unappreciated, and blah, blah, blah, that I really don't even have a clue about yet.., but I am sure you all know how nurses are treated, by patients and fellow staff.. let's give each other a break.. now lets kiss and make up k..:kiss
  9. by   Chevelle
    I also have many reasons for wanting to pursue my RN.

    I want to work with transplant patients and their families.

    I want to support my family so that my husband can stay at home with my daughter. I want her to have at least one full-time parent.

    In regards to the above, I need a job that would allow me to do that without having to worry about losing my job everyday that I go into the "office."

    I want to work three 12's instead of 5 to 6 days a week.

    I want to be humbled.

    I love hard work, stress, being challenged and I need a job where everyday is different.

    I like having options with where a career can take me.

    I can be proud of who I am and be able to look into the mirror everyday. If I worked for a corporation with my business degree-all I am doing everyday is work that only benefits the corporation.

    I am sure there are more. The more I learn about nursing, the more I want to do it. I volunteered in our local hospital in another department and no matter what I was doing, when I saw the nurses all I could think was...what am I doing here? I want to do THAT!
  10. by   LeashRN
    To Topcat, ditto. You and I must share a mind as you summed up my exact feelings.
  11. by   Sheri257
    I'm sorry, but this is what bugs me about the, "I wouldn't want you as my nurse" scenario, when you honestly say you're going into nursing because you need a steady job.

    Working conditions for nurses may be lousy but, as they're also fond of pointing out, there's always been a nursing shortage of some kind. So, most nurses have probably been gainfully employed and, even if they're not always happy in their jobs, at least they had a paycheck if they wanted one.

    A lot of us, by contrast, have worked in other professions and, consequently, have suffered through constant rounds of layoffs that can make life downright miserable. Lousy working conditions may be tough, but try living with NO paycheck. It's a lot tougher.

    So it's easy for them to say, "Don't go into nursing for the money," when they've always had options and we haven't. It's not fair to say we're going to be lousy nurses because, just for once, some of us would like a steady career, and not have to look over our shoulders all the time, waiting for those pink slips.

    The first order of business in life is survival. I fail to understand why that somehow makes me less caring or compassionate.

    :angryfire
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 11, '04
  12. by   Truly_Blessed
    I feel ya Lizz. I think this will always be an ongoing debate in nursing. Bottom line...there are those who will never understand because they have/had certain luxuries, options, forgot where they came from, etc. And sorry to say, but those are the ones I wouldn't want as my a nurse, because they lack the ability to empathize.
    Quote from lizz
    I'm sorry, but this is what bugs me about the, "I wouldn't want you as my nurse" scenario, when you honestly say you're going into nursing because you need a steady job.
    Working conditions for nurses may be lousy but, as they're also fond of pointing out, there's always been a nursing shortage of some kind. So, most nurses have probably been gainfully employed and, even if they're not always happy in their jobs, at least they had a paycheck if they wanted one.

    A lot of us, by contrast, have worked in other professions and, consequently, have suffered through constant rounds of layoffs that can make life downright miserable. Lousy working conditions may be tough, but try living with NO paycheck. It's a lot tougher.

    So it's easy for them to say, "Don't go into nursing for the money," when they've always had options and we haven't. It's not fair to say we're going to be lousy nurses because, just for once, some of us would like a steady career, and not have to look over our shoulders all the time, waiting for those pink slips.

    The first order of business in life is survival. I fail to understand why that somehow makes me less caring or compassionate.

    :angryfire
    Last edit by Truly_Blessed on Jun 11, '04
  13. by   LauraLou
    Nursing is physically and emotionally draining. You can have seven patients, 40 meds to give by 0900, doctors issuing new orders, family members calling and no CNA to help. On top of this, one of your patients rings the call light every 10 minutes because he is scared, lonely, confused, etc. Another patient's husband is irate because the doctor hasn't been in yet and he comes to the nursing station every 15 minutes demanding to know when the doctor will be coming.

    Everyone, regardless of their motivation to become a nurse, would be stressed, frustrated and aggravated.

    I think the question to ask yourself is how would I deal with the situation? Do I have the patience, emotional maturity, temperament and other personal resources to cope with the situation without letting my feelings impact patient care? I believe how you answer that question is the best indicator of what kind of nurse you will be, not motivation.

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