What does NPH stand for when talking about insulin?

  1. This was a question in class yesterday that our teacher couldn't answer. I can't find the info anywhere, so do you know what it stands for?
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   KMSRN
    Quote from twintoo
    This was a question in class yesterday that our teacher couldn't answer. I can't find the info anywhere, so do you know what it stands for?
    http://www.health-dictionary.com/dia...ls/NPH_insulin
    An intermediate-acting insulin; nph stands for neutral protamine hagedorn. On average, nph insulin starts to lower blood glucose within 1 to 2 hours after injection. It has its strongest effect 6 to 10 hours after injection but keeps working about 10 hours after injection. Also called n insulin.
  4. by   Mint Julip
    Quote from twintoo
    This was a question in class yesterday that our teacher couldn't answer. I can't find the info anywhere, so do you know what it stands for?

    NPH = Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (Isophane insulin)
  5. by   Carolanne
    Your post made me remember something from our clinical -- we were learning the different types of Insulin - NPH, Regular, Lantus, etc. Whenever we drew them up, the instructor asked what type it was - long acting, rapid, etc. For the life of me I couldn't get NPH down, so I made up a mneumonic - NPH is longacting so No Particular Hurry is what got me through those clinicals! Also, I made up Lantus is Long, Regular is Rapid, Humalog is Hurry/ also fast.

    Here's a really neat site that helped me a lot when we were learning Insulin injections, mixing, etc. Gives you a narrated video of demonstrations:
    http://www.bddiabetes.com/us/demos/injecting.asp
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Carolanne, that is a neat animated demo! I just put a link to it up on my nursing site.
  7. by   nekhismom
    ahhh, insulin. Never knew what NPH stood for, either. I just knew it was long acting.

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