What do you dissect in A&P Lab? - page 5

I have to take it this fall and I'm curious. :)... Read More

  1. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Geekgolightly,

    Thank you for your thoughtful counter-point.

    I think that the point I was trying to make was lost somewhere though.

    The concern that I am trying to emphasize involves the use of computer-based learning, so I must ask point-blank.

    Did you have to identify structures in the practical on a real specimen?
    Was the computer-based training done on a real specimen(video), or was it a graphical representation?

    Did the other students have equal access to the computer program that you did?

    If all of the above is true, then I think it's a good alternative. Identifying structures on a real specimen, as opposed to a color-coded 3-d image is the whole point.
  2. by   geekgolightly
    Originally posted by Peeps Mcarthur
    Geekgolightly,

    Thank you for your thoughtful counter-point.

    I think that the point I was trying to make was lost somewhere though.

    The concern that I am trying to emphasize involves the use of computer-based learning, so I must ask point-blank.

    Did you have to identify structures in the practical on a real specimen?
    Was the computer-based training done on a real specimen(video), or was it a graphical representation?

    Did the other students have equal access to the computer program that you did?

    If all of the above is true, then I think it's a good alternative. Identifying structures on a real specimen, as opposed to a color-coded 3-d image is the whole point.
    Hi Peeps.

    Yes, unfortunately I did have to identify structures inside the cat and in other animal parts. I was not happy, but I was unable to coerce the department to allow me to work fully from video still shots and computer based models. (There were no good ones to be had.)

    The training was done from old anatomy videos and from a CD enhanced learning packet that comes with the teacher's text for the course. Ideally, I would have liked to have been given the opportunity to learn from a cadaver video/cadaver CD. This is asking quite a bit from my school which is poorly funded and surprisingly, before me, had never been asked to provide materials for this ethical postiion. I hope that if more and more people ask for this type of material to be provided that they look into materials that are worthy. I did learn from these methods, but I think that with proper/updated equipment, I could have enhanced my learning exponentially.

    I was in the lab with the students while they were dissecting and I watched videos and worked on the comp and wrote up papers while they dissected. Some of the students would wander over and check out what I was doing and I would show them different things when they wanted to know about how/what I was learning. Mostly though, no one seemed to want to come over. I think they felt I was a paraiah. The teacher made a fuss about it when I brought up my desire to learn in a way other than dissection, and so I had to go over her head. She didn't like that much. The A I earned was certainly not easy!
  3. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Geekgolightly,
    I was also on the "do not make eye contact" list in anatomy lab. :chuckle I was frustrated with the lack of videos on the subject of cat disssection. Our lab was crowded and our specimens were not dissected properly. The instructor would occasionaly identify a few structures depending on the system we were studying, but for the most part, as a student you were rushing past other students like a reporter trying to get the scoop to press before the other papparazzi.

    So I bought a video camera to record such events. Standing within the huddled masses of hyperventillating students, with the camera raised above everyones heads, I struggled with the zoom and various camera angles just to get a glimps of my education.

    The lab instructor bristled at the sight of such a contraption in her lab. Despite numerous attempts to get her to identify structures when I was standing along side her, when she was alone and doing nothing else, I never got a "cat video". All requests for scheduling of a session at any time that was convienient for her were met with looks of disgust.

    I did have a lecture instructor that just loved me. She ended up giving me a cat video and a reveiw of systems from a model. I had to lurk around the science department for a month like a stalker to get it done.

    I replayed the video for groups of huddled students around my tiny camcorder on playback. They all wanted to see the video too but wouldn't help me get it done and would not talk about it around an instructor.......................as if it was cheating or something.

    I think video should be used in conjunction with dissection. It only makes sense. Students would get so much more time with the structures.
  4. by   twarlik
    The video is a great idea, Peeps.
    At my school the lab instructors made a video for each unit of study. It consisted of them reviewing the material and pointing out important structures on the models and specimens. It was really helpful. Plus, now that they've got the videos, they won't have to make them again for future semesters.

    Todd
  5. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    If I can ever afford a DVD burner I'll do the same. The audio-visual department here will do it but won't let me edit. I promised my instructor to edit the parts she wanted out and give her final aproval.

    I offered to lend my camera to the department for just that same thing. I guess because it was my idea, it must be evil
  6. by   CseMgr1
    I don't remember what I dissected.....mainly because I missed most of the labs, because I was pregnant and in my first trimester. I'd get a whiff of that Formaldehyde, and it was Barf City. I do remember my A&P Professor requesting my presence after class one day. I thought he was going to tell me that I had flunked out, because I had missed so many of the labs. But he just looked at me, grinning and observed dryly: "I understand that you are with child". When I nodded yes, he told me not to worry about coming to the rest of the labs, that my test grades were decent. Thank GOD for little favors!
  7. by   KristinWW
    Ye old cat here
  8. by   angell883RN
    Here kitty kitty also a frog, a cow heart and we got to observe a real cadaver ,post autopsy-very interesting indeed!!!
  9. by   Love4Me
    So far just a cow's heart.
  10. by   kyti
    Cats (I love cats). Mine was pregnant and so was I. The smell made me want to gag.
  11. by   allthingsbright
    sheep brain and heart, fetal pigs....ewwww. i have a strong stomach and ripping the brain apart really made me whoozy.
  12. by   RedSox33RN
    Interesting!

    I haven't dissected anything since 5th grade biology, but am taking A&P 1 this summer. I don't know what our school uses. I have done frogs before, but I have a feeling their anatomy is quite different than anything else I'd see! :chuckle

    I'm actually looking forward to it though. I'm taking Human Biology now, without the lab though, since I knew I'd be taking it w/A&P 1 and 2, and I'm getting anxious to get going on it! The classes I'm taking this semester are helping me a lot, but only 1 (English Comp) is a requirement for my degree. The others are just credits at this point, but have helped, especially the Medical Terminology.
  13. by   JenRN_2B
    Sheep brain, Beef hearts and eyes, and cadavers

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