We can't take the LPN boards while in ADN course. - page 2

last week we were notified by our nsg dept that adn students are no longer allowed to take the lpn board exams after our third semester. they said we now have to be enrolled in an lpn program in... Read More

  1. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from RNsRWe
    It isn't silly, as one of the primary reasons cited for this change is that the material an LPN is expected to have had in lectures and clinicals the RN student may not have even covered yet. And this is frequently the case, as the maternity/pediatric curriculum usually comes later in the RN program than would permissible if one were seeking eligibility for the PN exam.

    Scope of practice is also a big deal, as the RN programs aren't seeking to educate students on how to best work as an LPN.

    I can understand that to a degree. The thing is the LPNs coming in the RN program where I am at can test out of the first 2 semesters. Well as it turns out we learned quite a few things they never covered. So it really goes both ways except kind of backwards.

    I was also told the LPNs here didn't do OB rotations...just basically med surg stuff.

    So I see it silly because an LPN can test out of stuff they haven't done but an RN can't work as an LPN when we have more knowledge at this point then they had prior to finally coming in.

    I don't disagree with it not being allowed or have a problem with it. But when looking at the big picture it becomes silly because the rules are all over the place.
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    not every program is like this


    [s] [quote=sahstudent;2210671]i can understand that to a degree. the thing is the lpns coming in the rn program where i am at can test out of the first 2 semesters. well as it turns out we learned quite a few things they never covered. so it really goes both ways except kind of backwards[quote][quote].[/s]



    when lvn's go back to a transition class they generally have experience and i cant even imagine what in the world is in the first 2 semesters of rn school that a lvn has not done. cause all that stuff is just basic nursing. and remember you are not a rn trying to take the lvn test you are a nursing student ...big difference.

    [mouse] so i see it silly because an lpn can test out of stuff they haven't done but an rn can't work as an lpn when we have more knowledge at this point then they had prior to finally coming in[/mouse]
    Last edit by txspadequeenRN on May 19, '07
  3. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    not every program is like this

    when lvn's go back to a transition class they generally have experience and i cant even imagine what in the world is in the first 2 semesters of rn school that a lvn has not done. cause all that stuff is just basic nursing. and remember you are not a rn trying to take the lvn test you are a nursing student ...big difference.

    i'm not sure what you mean by not every program is like this.

    we went into more then basic nursing in our first 2 semesters. the lpns came in and were shocked. there was one lpn who decided to only skip 1 class and came for the next and was very glad she did. the lpns had no idea how to write a concept map or care plan and they had no idea you don't give k iv push...those are just some examples. there were also skills that they had not learned.

    and yes there is a difference but you can turn that around and say that if at this point the lpns come in and i have done everything prior to this point...at this point we are equal. we have been told by an instructor or 2 that we are at or passed the lpn level (not now but last semester).

    there is no doubt in my mind that we are educated to the level of an lpn or they wouldn't have had the lpns come back in at this point...and keeping in mind that they were open that they came into something and are in reality behind.
  4. by   Raeth
    We are allowed to become LPN's after 4 quarters. I think it's great... and instructors have been supportive of it, also have met some students further along in the program who work as LPN's in LTC (major hospitals here did away with LPNs a few years back) they have all suggested that we do the same. I know I will be taking the boards as soon as I finish 4th quarter... just too much good experience to pass up!
    Last edit by Raeth on May 21, '07 : Reason: my horrid typing!
  5. by   CuriousMe
    I don't know if it was statewide, but the Program I'm hoping to get into stopped letting their ADN students sit for the LPN test this past year.

    Peace,
    Cathie
  6. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from CuriousMe
    I don't know if it was statewide, but the Program I'm hoping to get into stopped letting their ADN students sit for the LPN test this past year.

    Peace,
    Cathie


    In PA it's a state thing. I'm sure it has to be a state thing because a school can't tell you what you can do in your personal life. I would imagine that you would just need to prove you took the courses and passed (easily done) before you sit for the boards. I guess the one way they could control it on a school level is if the state required a certificate of sorts from the school and they just refused to give them.

    Here it's a state thing.
  7. by   Achoo!
    We actually got a diploma stating that we passed the LPN curriculum after out forst yuear in the ADN program. We needed it in order to sit for boards. We took all of the skills classes, plus clinicals, inlcuding nursing management clinicals, so I don't understand how we could not be prepared to sit for the board?
  8. by   CrazyPremed
    In my state the ability to take the LPN boards is one of the selling points. The fact that we can work as LPNs while halfway through an ADN program - as opposed to the BSN - is one the main reasons that I came to the CC. Our curriculum here is set up to make it a normal transition. At the end of our second semester we've got to take the LPN predictor exam and if we don't do well enough, we may not pass. I'm glad that we still can take it!

    BTW, for ADN students taking the LPN exam, there has been a 100% pass rate over the prevoius three years.

    CrazyPremed
  9. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from SAHStudent
    I can understand that to a degree. The thing is the LPNs coming in the RN program where I am at can test out of the first 2 semesters. Well as it turns out we learned quite a few things they never covered. So it really goes both ways except kind of backwards.

    I was also told the LPNs here didn't do OB rotations...just basically med surg stuff.

    So I see it silly because an LPN can test out of stuff they haven't done but an RN can't work as an LPN when we have more knowledge at this point then they had prior to finally coming in.

    I don't disagree with it not being allowed or have a problem with it. But when looking at the big picture it becomes silly because the rules are all over the place.
    Ah, I can see the problem now.

    Like TX said, not every program runs this way; in fact, none in my area do. LPNs applying to my school were allowed to test out of the first semester only, Fundamentals, and they were expected to know the RN components of that first semester in order to successfully pass the "test out" option. I knew of exactly one that did that in the two years I was there. Others opted to go through the first semester and learn as the rest of us were learning.

    Also, our LPN programs most definitely teach OB! That was one of the problem areas for the early LPN testing in NYS.

    Finally, there was the problem of an RN student passing the NCLEX-PN, becoming licensed as an LPN, and not completing the RN program. Which means that they were NOT a graduate of ANY nursing program at all! And that meant no license available to them in other States should they desire to move or travel (much like the problem in CA with the 30-unit shortcut). It was a small concern since so few RN students exercised this option anyway, but still it was out there.
  10. by   RNsRWe
    The most recent issue of Advance for Nurses has an article on this BON policy change. However, it has an error in that it states that NYS is the ONLY State to still have this option. Oops!

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