Vial Access Cannulas

  1. I have a quick question about vial access cannulas. What are they used for (besides the obvious). I don't understand why the blue "sticker" stays in the vial. Is this just to let someone know that the vial has already been used??? I remember going over this a while back, but I haven't used one during clinicals so now I can't remember.

    Thanks
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   rnmaven
    Quote from DustinRN
    I have a quick question about vial access cannulas. What are they used for (besides the obvious). I don't understand why the blue "sticker" stays in the vial. Is this just to let someone know that the vial has already been used??? I remember going over this a while back, but I haven't used one during clinicals so now I can't remember.

    Thanks
    Hi!

    The main reason hospitals utilize vial access spikes or cannulas is to complete a needleless system. Once a vial is spiked with the access device you are able to withdraw fluid using only a syringe and you don't have to draw up with a needle. It's simply to reduce needle sticks.

    They are very costly and that's why many hospitals tried to not use them for the longest time. With many vials today being single dose versus multidose containers you end up using a new vial access device for every vial. I'm not sure what the blue sticker is you refer to. I am mostly familiar with the Abbott needleless systems because I used to sell Lifeshield which is the Abbott system.....hope this info helps you........... And don't cry........it will end someday and you'll actually be a nurse!
  4. by   DustinRN
    Quote from rnmaven
    Hi!

    The main reason hospitals utilize vial access spikes or cannulas is to complete a needleless system. Once a vial is spiked with the access device you are able to withdraw fluid using only a syringe and you don't have to draw up with a needle. It's simply to reduce needle sticks.

    They are very costly and that's why many hospitals tried to not use them for the longest time. With many vials today being single dose versus multidose containers you end up using a new vial access device for every vial. I'm not sure what the blue sticker is you refer to. I am mostly familiar with the Abbott needleless systems because I used to sell Lifeshield which is the Abbott system.....hope this info helps you........... And don't cry........it will end someday and you'll actually be a nurse!

    Lol, it ends May 10th of this year!!! :hatparty: Thanks for the response. The blue "sticker" thing I am referring to is the spike that stays in the vial after you insert the vial access cannula into the vial. Here's a picture of it.






    I truely must say that I don't understand what you mean by
    Once a vial is spiked with the access device you are able to withdraw fluid using only a syringe and you don't have to draw up with a needle. It's simply to reduce needle sticks.
    Once the spike is stuck into the needle, do you just leave it in there? Does it come out after you get done using it? I'm sorry I'm just confused as to how this thing works.
  5. by   DustinRN
    Nevermind, I think I've got it. If you were going to administer MSO4 or anything that comes in a single/multiple dose vial you can just stick it in there and pull out the medication you need. Then, the harpoon like thing stays in the vial and you're left with a blunt cannula to stick into a y-site or any interlink site. But would you only use these with an IV medication as the blunt cannula will do you no good with IM/SQ injections?


    I'll have to start using these little things. I'm been drawing up all my medication with needles. Thanks!
  6. by   rnmaven
    Quote from DustinRN
    Nevermind, I think I've got it. If you were going to administer MSO4 or anything that comes in a single/multiple dose vial you can just stick it in there and pull out the medication you need. Then, the harpoon like thing stays in the vial and you're left with a blunt cannula to stick into a y-site or any interlink site. But would you only use these with an IV medication as the blunt cannula will do you no good with IM/SQ injections?


    I'll have to start using these little things. I'm been drawing up all my medication with needles. Thanks!
    I think you've got it! The point of these access spikes is just that to allow you to draw up fluid from a vial without a needle. However, it you need to do an IM/SC injection of that fluid/medication you need to add a needle onto the syringe. It's very confusing because if you don't have a total system, you ultimately have to use a needle at some point in the chain....If the additive port of an IV container isn't pre-pierced you need a needlet to add the medication to that IV container/bag. If your Y-ports on the IV tubing isn't pre-pierced or a valve you need a needle! In most hospitals these systems are a hodge-podge of things that come and go with cost cutbacks, etc.

    The little blue thing that you refer to is just to let you know that the vial has been accessed........in essence it shouldn't be used again because the thought is that all vial medicines today should be single use vials......not multi-dose. Good luck.........and celebrate your upcoming graduation!:hatparty:
  7. by   DustinRN
    Appreciate it.

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