Vent/ Encourgagement needed

  1. This message has been deleted. I posted this for encouragement, not as a debate over when/where students need to get skills. Try to stick to the original post. Thanks to all who offered the support. You're awesome.
    Last edit by Aneroo on Feb 13, '05
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   DDRN4me
    Sometimes, you just need to step back take a deep breath and pray for the end of the shift! enjoy your day off and your much needed sleeP!
  4. by   Tweety
    Welcome to the world of nursing. You described my life. LOL

    I hope you get a good rest, sounds like you need it.

    I've seen and heard of people hitting arteries before, so don't feel bad about that. Are you sure you hit an artery? A 16g is a mighty big IV, so gushing blood if it's a good IV wouldn't be unusual. Nonetheless, it's o.k.

    Good luck to you.
  5. by   WildShot
    I dont have any words of wisdom or anything but I do want to wish you the best of luck in school. I am in my first year ADN and am pretty much overwhelmed myself. I TRY to remember how much better i have it then some others, but its difficult when everything just seems to come at you at once. I like thinking of this when i get down or overcomplicate my day
    http://hobbes.ncsa.uiuc.edu/desiderata.html
    I hope it helps you some but most of all remeber when you do need a hand or a shoulder there are people out here that are here for you and understand what you are going through (not like a bf/gf/so can) only those of us that are going through or have gone through nursing school can understand. tomorrow is always another chance to do some good.

    pleasant dreams and better tomorrows

    Dave
  6. by   meownsmile
    I to was wondering if it actually was an artery. A 16g with a high alcohol content could have made it seem like an artery, but no matter now. Get some sleep, and maybe next round wont be so bad.
  7. by   wonderbee
    Sounds like one of those days in nursing life. Poor thing. I feel for ya. Sleep well. By the time you read this, you should be ready for new adventures. BTW, why the 16g? Was the dude gonna get blood?
  8. by   wonderbee
    Quote from WildShot
    I dont have any words of wisdom or anything but I do want to wish you the best of luck in school. I am in my first year ADN and am pretty much overwhelmed myself. I TRY to remember how much better i have it then some others, but its difficult when everything just seems to come at you at once. I like thinking of this when i get down or overcomplicate my day
    http://hobbes.ncsa.uiuc.edu/desiderata.html
    I hope it helps you some but most of all remeber when you do need a hand or a shoulder there are people out here that are here for you and understand what you are going through (not like a bf/gf/so can) only those of us that are going through or have gone through nursing school can understand. tomorrow is always another chance to do some good.

    pleasant dreams and better tomorrows

    Dave
    Dave, thank you so much for providing that link. Back in the dark ages when I graduated from high school, I read the Desiderata at our graduation. I thought it was beautiful and put it away. Haven't read it since. Reading it now, it has so much meaning. Thanks again.
  9. by   Aneroo
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    Sounds like one of those days in nursing life. Poor thing. I feel for ya. Sleep well. By the time you read this, you should be ready for new adventures. BTW, why the 16g? Was the dude gonna get blood?
    Trauma...fell down a flight of stairs after getting the crap beat out of him by a bunch of Marines. When we let go of pressure, a steady stream of blood came flying up a few inches...enough for us to jump back and get blood all over the bed and floor. Luckily, I don't believe anyone was hit (at least not on flesh, pretty sure no one got some on clothes at that time).
    Thanks everyone...I really needed the "It's ok" messages. Luckily, my bf IS in nursing school with me, so he totally understands what I go through, understands my vents, and understands the excitement over little things (like first foley).
    So, again, thanks for the words. I needed it, yall are awesome!
  10. by   BETSRN
    Quote from Aneroo
    Ok...It's 4 something in the morning. Excuse the crappy typing. So, I rotated thru the ED tonight, followed the charge nurse and went in to see patients, and helped with procedures. Great chance for me to get skills I wasn't able to get on floor. So, I got my first foley :hatparty: I didn't tell them it was my first until I had actually done it. Got an IV pretty early on also. Right before I left, a new patient came in, (+) ETOH. I was starting an IV on him. Applied tourniquet, felt "vein"- felt good, no pulsations (you see where this is going?). SO I stick it, with a 16g... SWOOSH! I hit a frigging artery. I didn't feel a pulsation. I don't know I could miss the fact it was an artery, but we soon figured it out as soon as the stick began. Has anyone else has something like this happen? The nurses joked with me about it, told me they had done it also, but they were licensed.
    Now, I'm incredibly tired. I'm only in front of the comp because I was eating. My bf didn't wake me up in time, so I was running late, which means no Taco Bell for me. Anywho, I had clinical at 0630 this morning. I was so overwhelmed. One of my patients started to desat. It took forever for me to get to start charting.About the 15th time I went to start charting, my student leader (charge for students) came over and asked me if I had gotten a weight on a patient... After walking around for 5 minutes trying to find the darn equipment room, I saw her over there near it. I was about to start crying, because I felt so behind. Just one of those moments where you wonder when it will come together (even though it has somewhat), wonder how you're going to finish everything on time. She gave me a breather for a minute and I was ok after that.
    So, I've hard a rough day. I'm goign to bed, sleeping til God knows when. See yall SUnday
    It will come together for you. However, I am wondering why you were allowed to start IV's as a student. If I were that charge nurse, you would not have been doing it under my license (no offense). That stuff should be done with your instructor. My point of this s do NOT let yourself get into sitautions where you could get into hot water!
  11. by   ageless
    It will come together for you. However, I am wondering why you were allowed to start IV's as a student. If I were that charge nurse, you would not have been doing it under my license (no offense). That stuff should be done with your instructor. My point of this s do NOT let yourself get into sitautions where you could get into hot water!

    A student does not work under another RNs license. It is no more transferable then a driver's license. "Yes, officer, I have Nancy Nurse's drivers license so please bill this speeding ticket to her."

    Tasks are delegated to non-licensed persons. After they have documented that the student is prepared to try a new skill the student is assigned a preceptor by his/her school. A student has malpractise insurance through his/her school.

    Hitting an artery when starting an IV will probably happen to all of us at some point in our career. It is one on the assumed risks with the procedure. Too bad the patient didn't need an ABG.
  12. by   BETSRN
    Quote from ageless
    A student does not work under another RNs license. It is no more transferable then a driver's license. "Yes, officer, I have Nancy Nurse's drivers license so please bill this speeding ticket to her."

    Tasks are delegated to non-licensed persons. After they have documented that the student is prepared to try a new skill the student is assigned a preceptor by his/her school. A student has malpractise insurance through his/her school.

    Hitting an artery when starting an IV will probably happen to all of us at some point in our career. It is one on the assumed risks with the procedure. Too bad the patient didn't need an ABG.
    In all my years of doing IV's I have NEVER hit or come close to an artery! The assumption that we will all hit one is absurd! one learns correctly (through much practice) where to stick a patient.

    Who is responsible for these students? I doubt the hospital wil,l take on that liability! I have to say as a nurse, I would NOT take the student as my responsibility,without being with that student for any and all procedures that might be difficult.

    We have students and their instructors frequently on our floor.. They NEVER do IV's at all, they do not draw blood, and any and all medications are passed/given with the instructor present.
  13. by   rnmi2004
    Quote from BETSRN
    Who is responsible for these students? I doubt the hospital wil,l take on that liability! I have to say as a nurse, I would NOT take the student as my responsibility,without being with that student for any and all procedures that might be difficult.

    We have students and their instructors frequently on our floor.. They NEVER do IV's at all, they do not draw blood, and any and all medications are passed/given with the instructor present.
    I can see how the instructor's physical presence would be required for the above situations for a 1st/2nd semester student, but at some point students should be doing certain things, like PO/SQ meds, unsupervised. And in later semesters, the students in my area are giving IVP's & drawing blood with an instructor or staff RN present.
  14. by   BETSRN
    Quote from rnmi2004
    I can see how the instructor's physical presence would be required for the above situations for a 1st/2nd semester student, but at some point students should be doing certain things, like PO/SQ meds, unsupervised. And in later semesters, the students in my area are giving IVP's & drawing blood with an instructor or staff RN present.
    Students are practicing under their instructor's licenses. If it were my license, I'd make darn sure I knew what was going on, what was being given, and what was going on with each of my students' patients.

    Had this student in question been supervised by a preceptor, she never would have hit an artery doing an IV stick. Obviously, she either never had anyone show her proper technique, or she didn't listen or attend to past instruction. I have never seen anyone ever do that! One learns in their first semester of nursing school that arteries pulsate. Veins (used for IV access) do NOT.

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