ummm...etiquette???


  1. howdy all my school warriors...i'm back and complaining again (sorry)

    today was my first experience in a hospital...and - although i realize that my "preceptor" was not the most effective teacher (e.g. not effective at all) i was a little surprised by how umm....unfriendly / unhelpful (probably terrible grammar there) the nurses were on the floors!!! there were some exceptions - but -generally people were flat - out rude... even to the patients when they hit their call lights

    my questions are as follows:

    what is appropriate etiquette? if i couldn't find a chart - i was expected to just go searching and take it off of a desk or workspace - is that normal???

    how do you get your "sea legs" in a hospital?

    is it normal for people to just throw you in and watch you flounder?

    i have to say...i was astonished

    i guess my expectations were that us being new nurses and them being nurses, they would want to help us learn

    guess that's what i get for having expectations
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Rena RN 2003
    rudeness is never accepted in any facility where i've ever been.

    what i have seen is nurses so rushed that they don't have time to stop and make small talk. as far as finding charts go, we are on our own. we are taught to put charts back where we find them and to never wander off with them in case a nurse or dr. needs it. i have yet to see a floor nurse with time to go chart hunting with me. :chuckle

    don't know about "sea legs" either as i'm still finding mine. :chuckle but i don't flounder either. if i'm having questions about whether or not i'm doing what i'm supposed to be doing, i ask my instructor.

    i'm sure the nurses would love to help us learn. unfortunately, in most places, with patient loads the way they are the nurse just doesn't have time to teach us when he/she has so much of his/her own work to complete. they leave the teaching to the teachers/instructors. but most nurses i've come in contact with have had time to answer quick questions even if it was just with a "yes" or "no."

    i'm sorry you're feeling so shaky about your experience. just hang in there, i honestly believe it gets better.
  4. by   beaRNwhenIgroUP
    Originally posted by Rena RN 2003


    i'm sorry you're feeling so shaky about your experience. just hang in there, i honestly believe it gets better.
    thanks for the encouragement...i hope it does get better
    maybe it was a good thing...i found out what it's like to run around like a chicken w/ your head cut off, annoyed w/ paperwork and lack of instruction...

    i just prefer having a plan (however flexible) so i know at least a little about what can be expected during the accomplishment of a specific goal - even tho i know that things come up...

    anyhow, i won't be back in a HOSPITAL until senior year unless i volunteer for stuff like i did for today. so hopefully when i am actually there for rotations i'll be a bit more confident
  5. by   frankie
    Do not lower your expectations. Be kind, and good, and a patient advocate. Ask politely with a smile for a chart. Exchange pleasantries with the nurses. Some places never accept "new" anything/anyone. Some places always have open arms for patients, students, and, yes, even MDs. Keep your chin up. One day, you will set the tone for another student.
  6. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by frankie
    Do not lower your expectations. Be kind, and good, and a patient advocate. Ask politely with a smile for a chart. Exchange pleasantries with the nurses. Some places never accept "new" anything/anyone. Some places always have open arms for patients, students, and, yes, even MDs. Keep your chin up. One day, you will set the tone for another student.
    Very well put frankie
  7. by   rebelwaclause
    Sorry for your experience BeaRN. Rudeness is NEVER acceptable or cool, especially when its tossed at you. But on a cold-blooded, "The Real World - Nursing Unit" note......

    Welcome to nursing. Some nurses eat their young. Some nurses are rude and intolerant. The turn over for floor nursing is high and at an all time critical high in nursing shortages. The backlash effect is those who are "hanging" in there are tired, overworked and burned-out.

    Not your fault at all. Keep a positive attitude and you'll do fine. Check on a call light for another nurse and you'll be the winner. Sometimes your best experience is when you "flounder" and find the answer. You'll NEVER forget it! . Yeah - You gotta find that darn chart. Check with the doc's, they're good for hording a chart where you can't find it. Ancillary staff (PT, Case Managers, Dietary, etc). are second in line for holding charts captive.

    "It's all about the patient" is a motto that will help you when it doesn't make sense. If this motto doesn't work, then you've got to evaluate why you're in the nursing field.

    Hang in there...We need you!

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