Too Young? - page 2

I am waiting to hear from schools to see if I got into any Direct Entry programs. I know this is what I want to do and I'm really excited about it. My question is... have any of you ever had... Read More

  1. by   NurseLoveJoy88
    I just turned 20 in December and I will be a nurse at the age of 20 this year. People usually can't believe I'm so young. They often say I'm very mature for my age. I also think nursing school has aged me a bit ( dark circles around the eyes from being up late studying).

    I do worry that because of my age, it'll be hard to delegate to other nursing assistants who may be way older than me. I also worry that maybe patients and families won't take me seriosly. However, I know that as long as I know how to maintain professionalism, I should be fine.
  2. by   Daytonite
    Quote from nursing student 19
    i do worry that because of my age, it'll be hard to delegate to other nursing assistants who may be way older than me.
    now, that is a legitimate concern. i have seen that happen. most are not like that. it is the manipulative cnas who will be looking to cause trouble and get out of doing things that may be a problem. and, oh, can they be crafty. you have to learn assertiveness techniques as well as good principles of delegation, how to use them and not be afraid to use them. some cnas (the troublesome ones) act like bad little bratty children and literally have to be treated just the same or else they really do get out of control. guess who ends up feeling like they are the ones who are doing everything wrong? you. you don't need that kind of stress especially when you are a new grad. it helps to have been brought up by a mother like judge judy as a role model who won't take that kind of crap.

    i worked with some cnas in nursing homes that would make you want to pull your hair out! beside what i knew about assertiveness and the facility rules and regulations which some of this cnas broke with regularity, i used two books to help me out:
    • managing difficult people: a survival guide for handling any employee by marilyn pincus
    • working with difficult people by muriel solomon
    as rns and lpns and charge nurses we are often supervising (assigning and delegating) the care of patients that cnas give. if you need a list of the principles of delegation, i have and can list those, too, for you. i believe that your education entitles you to be respected by your coworkers at the very least.
  3. by   CSHRN
    I get it all the time. I'm 25 years old, a lieutenant in the army reserve and have been a registered nurse for 3 years now. I am tired of the ER population looking at my ID after I have identified myself, or calling me "kid," "son," asking how long I've been a nurse, or when I finished school. Just the other day while orienting a new nurse I missed an IV start and asked my orientee, who is older than me, to give it a try. Later he told me the patient said, "I guess the newbie couldn't get it." I've heard I will look good in the future, but I want to be taken seriously right now.
  4. by   Arievilo
    I completely understand where you are coming from. I went directly into a second degree nursing program right after I finished college - at 21 years old. I'm now about halfway through the program and 22 - but I had an awful lot of comments from professors who were shocked to see I was in a second career program at such a young age. I am also sick of the comments that professors make like "you guys have a lot of 'life' experience already since you've been working for so long." I am definately the youngest in my group. Most student are in their late twenties and early thirties and we even have a few students into their 50's. Its not bad, because its much more interesting being in a group with non-traditional students unlike the first four years of college with a bunch of kids who didn't really care. Good Luck!
  5. by   ProfRN4
    I think it is all in the way you act, speak and present yourself. I teach a lot of young students, and I really don't pay mind to their actual age. Then every once in a while when I see their DOBs, I realize just how young they are.

    And yes, while it is being judgmental, there are some things that make the younger students (and nurses) stand out in the crowd: Tattoos and piercings that are not appropriately covered. One of our best students has both arms fully inked, and more often than not, she wears long sleeves to cover them. In clinical, it is a must. She is young (mid 20's) but mature enough to know what is professional. Speech is another thing. Even when speaking in a non-formal forum (like skills lab, or during clinical (not during actual patient care). The remark that someone mentioned (how all statements sound like a question) is so true, and all I can think of is "Oh my Gawdddd" attached to it .

    Even the way you present yourself online or via text is key. Sure, I use text speak when I am talking to my friends. But I think it is completely unprofessional to communicate like that to a professor or a supervisor.

    On the flipside, I was a "young nurse", graduated at 20, and looked very young. So I speak from experience. I know I did not want to give up my youthful look, I always tried to maintain some symbol of my youth when i first started out. When I was in school, there was no one else my age (in the early 90's most of the students were mid-late 20's and 30's), so I kind of blended in with that crowd, and became 'mature'. As a professor, I still am considered young. Some (not too many any more) of my students are older than me. if it werent for the lab coat, I would be mistaken for a student!!
  6. by   NurseLoveJoy88
    Quote from daytonite
    now, that is a legitimate concern. i have seen that happen. most are not like that. it is the manipulative cnas who will be looking to cause trouble and get out of doing things that may be a problem. and, oh, can they be crafty. you have to learn assertiveness techniques as well as good principles of delegation, how to use them and not be afraid to use them. some cnas (the troublesome ones) act like bad little bratty children and literally have to be treated just the same or else they really do get out of control. guess who ends up feeling like they are the ones who are doing everything wrong? you. you don't need that kind of stress especially when you are a new grad. it helps to have been brought up by a mother like judge judy as a role model who won't take that kind of crap.


    i worked with some cnas in nursing homes that would make you want to pull your hair out! beside what i knew about assertiveness and the facility rules and regulations which some of this cnas broke with regularity, i used two books to help me out:
    • managing difficult people: a survival guide for handling any employee by marilyn pincus
    • working with difficult people by muriel solomon
    as rns and lpns and charge nurses we are often supervising (assigning and delegating) the care of patients that cnas give. if you need a list of the principles of delegation, i have and can list those, too, for you. i believe that your education entitles you to be respected by your coworkers at the very least.
    thanks daytonite !

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