Thoughts from a graduating SN. - page 3

Nursing school for me is officially over. Our pinning ceremony happens this afternoon; with plenty of alcohol and finger foods to follow. I thought I would share my experiences in nursing school to... Read More

  1. by   amyk_ncsu
    Congrats on graduating!

    You described exactly the way I studied and approached my first degree in college. I was hoping to do the same for nursing school (start next month), but a lot advice I'd gotten had kind of made me think that I had to read everything and basically study 24/7 in order to even get a barely passable grade. I was very very nervous about starting and basically giving up my life. Well, you have made me feel 150% better in that my study habits might actually work, and hopefully work well. I'm sure some things will work and some wont, but at least I know that I might have some kind of free time after all.

    Thanks, and congrats again!!!!
  2. by   NaomieRN
    Congratulations!!!
    I do not think reading the book is a waste of time. My instructor said this past semester, reading the book is like the meat and the potato of his lectures. There are so much information in nursing, there is no way the instructor can cover everything. My instructor would give us the pages to focus on from the textbook. I would say almost 100% of the questions on the exams, came from the charts and the clients scenarios from the book. I also found out the end chapter questions help because sometimes the instructor would pull some questions from them. I think reading the book is more beneficial than not reading.
    Thank you for the rest of the tips, I will try to do more flashcards.
  3. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    Why are you gonna burn 3500 notecards......

    mail them to me.
    I'll fight you for them!!!! I'm dead serious! If you want copy the cards. I'll pay for a copy and shipping!
  4. by   tutored
    stop calling yourself a "male nurse" - you diminish yourself. Congratulations! Good luck on your career!
  5. by   tddowney
    Quote from JaxiaKiley
    Congrats! And thanks for sharing your study methods. I made so many flashcards so far in pre-reqs that I feel like I need to buy stock! I must say that flashcards really work for me. I suggest them to everyone.
    I use Powerpoint to make "flashcards."

    One slide for the drug name, for instance, and the second for pertinent info.

    I can transfer the PP file to my PDA and have it handy with me. Much smaller and handier than actual cards for my money.

    Thankfully, most of our instructors provide good objectives for what they want us to know, and often study guides to focus on the parts of the book they consider important.............often the nursing interventions, client teaching points, etc.

    I'm in an accelerated program, and reading all of the material simply isn't an option.
  6. by   tddowney
    Quote from redefinition
    congrats on graduating!


    my study habits were so different, though. i never studied ahead of time - i would do an all-wkend and all-night the night before of the test cram. i'd never go to bed before 3am on nights before tests, even finals. no flashcards and i did read pretty much everything because our profs would take the tiniest and most insignificant thing out of the text that was never discussed in class. study groups did nothing for me but give me a time to bond w/ fellow students. of course, my way definitely won't work for a lot of people!
    I could do that when I was in school for my first degree.

    Now that I'm over 50, the short term memory isn't what it used to be. I can't cram like that.

    Picking partners for a study group is the key to it working or not. If you're focused on the task, they're great. If you have one or two people who want a social session, the group is simply a waste of time.
  7. by   moongirl
    Quote from tutored
    stop calling yourself a "male nurse" - you diminish yourself.
    what?? how does this "diminish" him?????
    he is a male, and he is a nurse.. and proud of it. So whats your point?
  8. by   tutored
    Hi Moongirl! My point is that he shouldn't call himslef a "male nurse"....He's a nurse, period. it would help, I think, all nurses, but particularly male nurses, if we stop calling them something different from what they are, mainly, nurses. we don't call oursleves female nurses, do we? Nor did women entering the previously-dominated medical profession call themselves "female doctors", though I"m sure they were called as such in the late forties and early fifties. He's a nurse, and should be proud. Vocabulary such as "male nurse" is, I think, exclusional and labels nursing as a female profession (it isn't, as we all know).
  9. by   sunnyjohn
    bumping.... Good thread... (and waiting to hear were to send the paypal money for my flashcards! wink, wink, hint, hint!)

  10. by   cherokeesummer
    Congrats and your input is GREAT...you have a wealth of information. I am thinking of doing the question format note cards this semester...it is my last semester though so I dont' know if its too late LOL!
  11. by   Sheri257
    Quote from EnigmaticParadigm
    Textbooks - use ONLY if you don't understand something from lecture. I can't tell you how important this is. I've seen so many of my classmates fail (or do poorly) on exams because they thought they needed to know EVERYTHING about the disease process in question. Basically, the instructors hand out the major concepts you need to know. Sure, they might pull in an odd question or two, but that is not reason enough to read 100+ page chapters. If there is something in the lecture/ lecture notes you don't fully grasp, THEN go to the book; never before. You'll waste your time memorizing concepts that you won't be tested on. Knowledge is wonderful and you'll have an entire lifetime ahead of you to learn the "details." For nursing school, memorize what you HAVE to know.
    The big problem with this statement is: what you have to know varies considerably with each instructor. As a recent grad myself, I can definitely say that many of my instructors DID NOT spoon feed everything we needed to know in lecture.

    If you don't read ... in many cases it's a ticket for failure. While you can get by without reading the book for some instructors ... that definitely is not the case with all of them. I'd have to say at least half of my teachers tested directly from the book ... heavily.

    With some instructors 50 percent of the test questions came directly from the reading ... not lecture. And even for those who didn't test from the book that much, a good ten percent of the questions came from the book, no where else.

    If you go into a test not knowing anything about ten percent of the material and not being able to answer ten percent of the questions ... you're at a major disadvantage.

    On a 100 point test, that means you're already down 10 points so you better do fantastic on everything else. It's not a great risk to take, especially with tough critical thinking questions ... where the margin for error on nursing school tests is pretty small as it is.

    Ask anybody who's failed an entire semester by missing just one point on every test ... ignoring the reading does catch up with you.

    Yes, getting bogged down in too much of the reading details can hurt you ... you definitely have to learn how to read more efficiently and effectively.

    But, ignoring the reading all together can and will hurt you even more. Nursing instructors don't have time to spoon feed everything you need to know in lecture and expecting them to do that is, IMO, nuts.

    The people who did not read in my class were the people who failed and had to repeat. Believe me ... they learned the hard way and started reading after that.

    9 times out of 10 ... when people tried to challenge test questions ... the instructor would always point to the book. It was there: people just didn't read it ... and they definitely paid the price.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 24, '06
  12. by   mysterious_one
    Quote from lizz
    The big problem with this statement is: what you have to know varies considerably with each instructor. As a recent grad myself, I can definitely say that many of my instructors DID NOT spoon feed everything we needed to know in lecture.

    If you don't read ... in many cases it's a ticket for failure. While you can get by without reading the book for some instructors ... that definitely is not the case with all of them. I'd have to say at least half of my teachers tested directly from the book ... heavily.

    With some instructors 50 percent of the test questions came directly from the reading ... not lecture. And even for those who didn't test from the book that much, a good ten percent of the questions came from the book, no where else.

    If you go into a test not knowing anything about ten percent of the material and not being able to answer ten percent of the questions ... you're at a major disadvantage.

    On a 100 point test, that means you're already down 10 points so you better do fantastic on everything else. It's not a great risk to take, especially with tough critical thinking questions ... where the margin for error on nursing school tests is pretty small as it is.

    Ask anybody who's failed an entire semester by missing just one point on every test ... ignoring the reading does catch up with you.

    Yes, getting bogged down in too much of the reading details can hurt you ... you definitely have to learn how to read more efficiently and effectively.

    But, ignoring the reading all together can and will hurt you even more. Nursing instructors don't have time to spoon feed everything you need to know in lecture and expecting them to do that is, IMO, nuts.

    The people who did not read in my class were the people who failed and had to repeat. Believe me ... they learned the hard way and started reading after that.

    9 times out of 10 ... when people tried to challenge test questions ... the instructor would always point to the book. It was there: people just didn't read it ... and they definitely paid the price.

    :typing
    YOu couldn't have said it better, I have been wanting to add to this thread for a while about this subject with the reading of the books, myself. I commend the OP for the ideas with the flashcards, but to recommend not to read the book is dangerous. Our instructors also do not cover a lot in class and sure enough things will show up on the tests, that you could only have read in the books. And often it is more then 10 percent. For anyone reading this thread , be careful and evaluate your instructors first before you decide not to read your books at all.
  13. by   WDWpixieRN
    To elaborate a bit further on my earlier post, I have to agree with lizz and mysterious...I remember two tests that had questions almost identical to info given in the text, and many more times that there were tidbits I would never have known had I not gone through the text....that doesn't mean I caught everything -- it's a LOT of reading sometimes...but to totally ignore that the text exists is asking for problems when it comes time to add up all those test points!! But I definitely think this is something that you'll only know after learning about your instructors...

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