Teaching Hospitals??

  1. Hi, All!

    Happy Friday!

    Probably a silly question but what's the difference in a 'teaching' hospital and a typical hospital?? And how can you tell if a hospital is one or the other??

    Thx!
    S
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   cursenurse
    i think that teaching hospitals are affiliated with a college or university and teach med students (that's what i've always thought.) it's usually easy to tell if a hospital is a teaching one, it is something that will be stated in the description of the hospital.
  4. by   EMTtoRN
    I agree with the above post. I know I used to work at a teaching hospital and patients were usually taken care of residents under the guidance of senior md's unless the pt said otherwise. When I was a pt there I was bombarded all day with residents. They usually get alot more funding though because they are affiliated etc and get many grants for new things since they teach techniques.
  5. by   Smile!
    Ah...Is it better to try to work in a teaching hospital when you first graduate or, at that point, does it really matter??
  6. by   Gompers
    Quote from Smile!
    Ah...Is it better to try to work in a teaching hospital when you first graduate or, at that point, does it really matter??
    I prefer a teaching hospital, especially for new grads. Because you are surrounded by bumbling medical students and insecure residents, it's easier to fit in and you feel much more comfortable asking questions. It's a big-time learning environment because they are sometimes researching a lot of new things. When you're all learning, you feel more like a team. Now, during nursing school when I worked as a CNA at a non-teaching hospital, it seemed to me like the doctor-nurse relationship seemed more subordinate and the docs didn't seem to have a whole lot of patience with inexperienced nurses. This is just my own experience, so please no flames!!! :uhoh21:
  7. by   suzanne4
    Starting out the big teaching hospitals are the best place to be. Everyone is used to teaching, most of the docs are there all of the time so they don't mind taking the time to teach you something new. Plus more research is going on there, and you usually will see the newest thigs there first.

    Good luck....................
  8. by   wonderbee
    Anyone have any info on Shands in Gainesville? I might like to work at Shands on graduation.
  9. by   anc33
    I'll actually begin working there (Shands UF) as a new grad later this summer. The pay is not great (17.25) but I enjoy academic environments and am looking forward to engaging in research, etc. I don't know which Shands you are interested in but, if it's Gainesville, give Jennifer in the HR dept. a call.
  10. by   wonderbee
    Quote from anc33
    I'll actually begin working there (Shands UF) as a new grad later this summer. The pay is not great (17.25) but I enjoy academic environments and am looking forward to engaging in research, etc. I don't know which Shands you are interested in but, if it's Gainesville, give Jennifer in the HR dept. a call.
    Thanks for the info anc. Is that pay rate for a GN? I just know I'd love a teaching hospital. I worked at Jackson Memorial in Miami years back in a clerical capacity and just loved the environment. I'm in between my first and second semesters so there will be some time before I start making moves for my graduate job. Gainesville looks like a nice place to live too.
  11. by   anc33
    GN and RN pay are the same.
  12. by   Jen2
    I worked at a 200 bed community hospital for 3 years and hated it. I have just started at a 850 bed teaching hospital and I love it. I still have a year of nursing school left, but I can tell you that I felt at home in this hospital from day 1. A totally different environment than what I am used to and I love it.
  13. by   PCGrad06
    the hospital i will be training at is a teaching hospital. i have heard good things about it too. they are more willing to help you and their starting pay is more also i think.

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