Teachers fueling the "my degree is better than your degree" problem - pg.2 | allnurses

Teachers fueling the "my degree is better than your degree" problem - page 2

I'm in a BSN program. I'm 32, with kids, and a husband who has been super supportive of me taking the longer approach to entering the nursing scene. I also hope to move on to a masters program in the... Read More

  1. Visit  amoLucia profile page
    1
    Grn Tea's response is so right on - she says very clearly what your instructor is trying to convey, but just may not be as succinct & as clear. And as much as you may not want to hear it, it needs to be said.

    Way back in the dinosaur ages of the 1970s, my BSN instructors expounded with foresight on the future of our BSNs. My ADN (I have an Associate's degree) and that of my ADN and diploma associates were never minimized. But the differences were clearly explained and it has come to pass/come full around. They spoke the truth then, about the current now - and that was in the '70's!!!

    The need for the BSN was the written on the wall then and current instructors are merely re-iterating the state of the nursing profession and the healthcare industries as it is today. It is what it is. Just no mincing the words about it.
    GrnTea likes this.
  2. Visit  nguyency77 profile page
    1
    I can't say I know what you teacher is getting at, but it makes sense. If I were an ADN, I would attempt to bridge to BSN as soon as possible. It's not a matter of which degree makes a better nurse, but rather which degree will give you more opportunities.

    GrnTea:
    Someday soon I'm going to make a GrnTea appreciation thread, lol!
    amoLucia likes this.
  3. Visit  Orange Tree profile page
    1
    I agree that more education is always better. I'm not sure why some people find that idea so offensive. I am very proud of my associate's degree, but I'd be even happier with a master's!
    amoLucia likes this.
  4. Visit  msteeleart profile page
    3
    If I would of had the choice, I would have went the BSN route but every BSN program in town is at least $50k. I am no longer in my 20's and I have a child. I went the ADN route because I wanted to better our financial position, not put us deeper in debt. My student loan for the ADN is only $3500 and I have already been admitted at Ohio University for the RN to BSN which is the lowest priced program I could find. No instructor should bash any degree. We all have different situations and lives and the goal to be an RN is the same, but we each must go the route that is best for us.
    gummi bear, Blue Jam, and soxgirl2008 like this.
  5. Visit  Racer15 profile page
    1
    Meh, I went the ADN route because it was faster and far cheaper. I wasn't concerned about clinical ladders, I just wanted a job that paid more than $9.00/hour and I needed money. I already have a BSA, so getting another bachelors degree won't be that difficult or time consuming for me. The plan is to start on mine this fall, and I'll be making enough money to actually pay for the degree outright instead of having to rack up even more student loans. What works for someone is what they need to do. If this is your first degree and you don't have the debt I did, then a BSN probably makes more sense, but I had maxed out my grants and was having to pay for this degree with cash and loans, so I did what was most financially sound for me and I don't regret it.
    soxgirl2008 likes this.
  6. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    1
    I'm the same way. I have no lack of education, so the idea of being a bachelor's degree level nurse wasn't all that important to me.

    The closest BSN program to me is about an hour away (without traffic...so more like 2 hours) and I had a full scholarship for my ADN program. There was no way I could get into debt on top of the inconvenience of commuting and handling 3 little kids, so the ADN was a no brainer for me.

    My program has multiple articulation agreements with RN-BSN programs, so there's no "misconception" that my credits transfer. Graduate in May, start BSN program in June, done in 11 months.

    If both the ADN and BSN were equally accessible to me I definitely would've chosen the BSN, but this was the best choice for my family and I.
    gummi bear likes this.
  7. Visit  Jujubees profile page
    2
    I'm sure a bsn as a first degree over an adn has a variety of great benefits. the topic however was not that there are things about a bsn that are better than an adn. There's nothing wrong with a teacher saying "look, you're getting a top notch education" the problem and also the subject of the original post was the attitude of a teacher that "you will be a better nurse than your adn counterparts" being instilled into an entire class of new nurses. How will that benefit anyone or anything? How about this attitude instead "you will be better off than you would have been coming out of an adn program" Not the attitude of I'm better than others but the attitude of I'm better than I could have been otherwise. Let's have that instead.
    gummi bear and soxgirl2008 like this.
  8. Visit  soxgirl2008 profile page
    2
    ^^exactly. There is nothing wrong with being proud of your education. Higher education is always a good thing, but telling people "this is why you'll be a better nurse than that ADN nurse over there" is the wrong approach.
    heartsgal and gummi bear like this.
  9. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    Eloquently put, GrnTea, always.

    I think we can all agree that more education, as well as quality education, is better.

    I am proud of my roots. I found being in those same positions made me respectful of who is a part of the nursing care team...I have found when I did get through my BSN program, the WHY did click, but I knew the why prior...but it was more CLEAR when I got there.

    I am grateful of the knowledge, and the exposures of my program and the courses that helped built on the previous education. It is true that the BSN program I went to had research which went into nursing theory, which can really understand the WHY of your practice, as well as the more in-depth aspects of our practice.

    However, not many have the immediate opportunity to go the BSN route...I went the 12-year plan...I probably could've been a Dr., lol, but I choose Nursing
  10. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    Quote from soxgirl2008
    ^^exactly. There is nothing wrong with being proud of your education. Higher education is always a good thing, but telling people "this is why you'll be a better nurse than that ADN nurse over there" is the wrong approach.
    ^Agreed...too bad we don't know how her actual "delivery" was...hope she doesn't affect too many minds if it that is how she "approached" it
  11. Visit  Jujubees profile page
    0
    Quote from LadyFree28
    Eloquently put, GrnTea, always.

    I think we can all agree that more education, as well as quality education, is better.

    I am proud of my roots. I found being in those same positions made me respectful of who is a part of the nursing care team...I have found when I did get through my BSN program, the WHY did click, but I knew the why prior...but it was more CLEAR when I got there.

    I am grateful of the knowledge, and the exposures of my program and the courses that helped built on the previous education. It is true that the BSN program I went to had research which went into nursing theory, which can really understand the WHY of your practice, as well as the more in-depth aspects of our practice.

    However, not many have the immediate opportunity to go the BSN route...I went the 12-year plan...I probably could've been a Dr., lol, but I choose Nursing
    woah, how'd you get 12 years into your plan? is that including a lvn first? or a doctorate? just curious
  12. Visit  IndiCRNA profile page
    1
    Until recently the ADN-RN to BSN route had a huge advantage over the strait BSN route. Previous to about 2008 the only advantage of the strait BSN route was the whole "college experience". For young high school grads it really was the way to go IMO. However for adult students the ADN-RN to BSN was a really good option and provided many advantages not offered by the strait BSN route. In my opinion many grads of strait BSN programs were jelous of the advantages enjoyed by the ADN-RN to BSN route. Things have changed. With so many hospitals prefering to hire new grads with BSNs over ADNs the BSN provides advantages that the ADN-RN to BSN route can't offer.
    I find the huge expence of many BSN prgrams hard to justify considering that so many new grad RNs starting pay is around $20-$24 and hour. Pretty good pay for a two year program costing less than $10K, questionable for a program that takes 4 years and cost $60K plus.
    I did ADN RN in two years, as many people do in my state. Actualy only went to school 16 months, four, 4 month semesters for a total cost of around $6K. Then when I decided I wanted to go to CRNA school I did an RN to BSN program in a little less than a year. Don't let anyone blow smoke up your backside about new grads with a BSN being superior nurses to new grads with an ADN. It simply isn't true. I have a lot of experience teaching and precepting in my hospital's critical care nurse residency program. It is a very challenging 9 month program with high academic standards. Plenty of new grads wash out. We were unable to predict who would pass the program and go on to be competent critical care nurses based on the degree they brought to the program. We did notice that those who were a little older and had more life experience did better. Another thing we noticed is that so few of the new grad BSNs actually finish the 2 year contract they signed to get into the program vs 100% of ADN grads finishing the contract. In addition the BSN grads were a little more costly to train since they came to us without having been trained in many basic nursing skills. So while the ADN grads were learning about hemodynamics, or emergency procedures, or slicing up pig hearts, or observing a CABG operation, the BSN grads were down in same day surgery learning to place IVs, or in the ER placing NG tubes, or with lab learning to draw blood. Its hard to concentrate on learning critical thinking and priorities when you are concentrating on basic hands on skills.
    In the end though plenty with both degrees washed out and plenty with both degrees went on to be competent ICU nurses.
    Esme12 likes this.
  13. Visit  E.niles profile page
    0
    In Fla all credits from an ASN received from a public college transfer directly to a BSN from a public University, which is nice since my hospital is paying for most of my classes.


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