Student's nurse fears.

  1. Your first day on the floor can be scary.
    Here are some tips that I've found to help, and
    I hope others can share some too.
    1. Be Friendly. Smile.
    2. Be Helpful. Offer assistance.
    3. Ask questions. If you are asked to do something for the first time, ask for a demonstration, explaining that you've never done this before.
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   Donna
    Still online? I am supposed to graduate next Wednesday-still have my finals to go.
    I am SCARED to death. I have been a CNA II for 5 years, but as a LPN I will have more responsibility. When does it all "come together"?
  4. by   KC
    I'm smiling very big when I type this.
    It 'all comes together' about the time that you start having "Nursing" dreams.
    My nursing dreams were about getting to work and finding I didn't have to work short staffed that night. I also dreamed about endless supplies and never running out.

    [This message has been edited by KC (edited 08-01-98).]
  5. by   SDOWD
    HELLO...
    I just graduated High-school May-98 and now Aug.10 I will begin Nursing School at HAR-BER (Harvey and Bernice Jones) school of nursing. It was just recently changed from "Baptist School Of Nursing-NW" in Springdale, Arkansas the other is in Little Rock. It will be a new experiance. I am excited...I'm interested in Pediatric and OB...Registered Nursing... I feel that would be a strong area for me... I was wondering if you had any ideas of how to do my best...in achieving my RN. I really do enjoy your Nursing Bulletin Boards it has given me ideas for NURSING... THANKYOU
    PLEASE REPLY...
    ~STACEY~
  6. by   KC
    Nursing is a blend of science and caring. No one can teach you caring, you have this from your heart. But Science can be learned. Since Science isn't just one thing, rather it's a collection of things that we have observed. And WoW! what a big collection. I'm just an average student, but I can pass on a couple of hints; do well in the core science classes, for they will allow you to enjoy your "Nursing" classes. Biology, Microbiology, Anatomy et Physiology, Chemistry, Pathophysiology, Pharmacology...the list seems endless. Also, a huge part of nursing is Nursing itself. This seems like an oxymoron, but hands-on nursing can begin very early in your education if you work at a hospital or nursing home (LTC). More than experience, you get a love for nursing. If you don't get a love for nursing, it isn't too late to become a cellular biologist, who, by the way, make more money than nurses, work better hours and don't get eaten for lunch periodically by their co-workers.
  7. by   bkf
    Stacey,
    Ive been a labor & Delivery nurse for about 5 yrs...it helped me get into the field by working as a "PCA/ PCT" while in nursing school...they got to know me and I got to learn and ask questiond...most units like to hire people they know...prove yourself ahead of time and enjoy the learning. Best of luck!! OB is a great career choice! BKF
  8. by   ChadleyNC
    So I begin classes for my ADN in the fall. August 25th and my first clinical day is the 10th of September. Lots to learn in a short time. I know that I will not be expected to know everything there is to know.. however.. I worry about a few things. I'm not new in any way to the clinical floor, I have held numerous positions that required immense quantities of patient contact. However, none of it was clinical in nature. All of it was support personnel positioning and this scares me. What if I am assigned to a terribly difficult nurse to shadow? How can I keep from irritating the fire out of an already overworked and underpaid person? :uhoh21: or what if my first assigned patient refuses care from me for some reason? I know these are everyday trials and things that must be dealt with, but preparation for the concept of all of this is a bit overwhelming when I think about it. Sure it's early for me to worry, but that's how I work best.. lol help?
  9. by   ChiaLing
    Quote from KC
    If you don't get a love for nursing, it isn't too late to become a cellular biologist, who, by the way, make more money than nurses, work better hours and don't get eaten for lunch periodically by their co-workers.
    That's so funny that you said that, because I'm actually starting nursing school in the fall, after switching away from molecular biology. I found that I just wasn't satisfied working in a research lab, and in fact, RNs generally make more money than I did as a research assistant (albeit I only have a B.A. in molecular biology). :chuckle
  10. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from ChiaLing
    That's so funny that you said that, because I'm actually starting nursing school in the fall, after switching away from molecular biology. I found that I just wasn't satisfied working in a research lab, and in fact, RNs generally make more money than I did as a research assistant (albeit I only have a B.A. in molecular biology). :chuckle

    Isn't this thread extemely old? How did it get here?
  11. by   wonderbee
    Some extras:

    Start becoming accustomed to using your nondominant hand. Nurses never seem to have enough hands. You will see in your clinical labs how often and use of that hand comes into play. Practice doing things with your nondominant hand around the house that you normally do with your dominant hand. It requires a bit of forethought.

    Don't be hard on yourself that it takes forever to make that first bed and give that first bed bath.

    Do pay attention to where things are located, especially linens. Make notes of any codes you need to get where you need to go.

    Do be quick to get your hands on a dynamap. There are NEVER enough working dynamaps on the floor and don't forget to plug it in to charge when you're done with it.

    DON'T waste your time trying to find a dynamap that does work if one is not quickly availble. Take manual VS using your steth and good old fashioned manual cuff. I'm surprised at the number of nurses on the floor that can't take a manual BP. Dynamaps aren't always accurate. Confirmations are usually done manually when readings are substantially out of the range of normal.


    BREATHE!
  12. by   z's playa
    Quote from JessicaGmz
    Isn't this thread extemely old? How did it get here?

    Holy cow is it ever ! :chuckle

    Z
  13. by   maronica
    I have a quesiton about being a recovering addict. Will this hender me from being licensed?
  14. by   ChadleyNC
    Quote from maronica
    I have a quesiton about being a recovering addict. Will this hender me from being licensed?

    I think that the issue of hinderance with licensure is going to be state specific. I do no know for sure, but I am pretty certain that unless you did something illegal at some point and have a felonious record of some kind that you would be allowed to test for and receive your license to practice.

    I work in for a substance abuse hospital and we see a good number of nurses come in to complete our program. Most of their licensure issues are not due to their addiction, they are due to something they did while under the influence.

    I would view the fact thtat you are in recovery not only as a positive thing, but as any other medical condition. Not all medical conditions must be reported, only those that may hinder your ability to perform.

    Best of luck to you...
    Chadley

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