Sloppy clinical instructor? - page 2

I had one clinical day (my first clinical day) with an instructor that just started working at my college recently and I just can't stop thinking about an incident that occurred with her. I'm in my... Read More

  1. by   Irish_Mist
    Quote from 37changes
    Every single one of the TEN of us were told to file in to an elderly man's room to witness a straight cath recently. Add to that two nurses, a CNA, and our clinical instructor = 14 people in one half of a nursing home room, watching. This went on for awhile, too, as they were having problems actually reaching his bladder. They tried multiple different kinds of catheters. And we were all there watching the entire time.
    Why didn't this patient's nurse speak up? I for one as the patient's nurse would have told all of those people to get the heck out of the room. One or two students, maybe. But 14? That's just not okay at all. Poor guy.
  2. by   rhinoroc
    That really shouldn't have happened. You'll have so many more opportunities and meet patients who don't care if all the students are in there but the patient who is uncomfortable with even one extra student should be protected. Patient advocacy is huge in my book and sounds like it will be in yours. You'll see a lot of bad practice but I'd just keep an eye out for it at the moment and make note of what you don't want to be. If it happens again, walking out of the room because you know a patient is uncomfortable will be your way of advocating for the patient. When your instructor talks to you about it, that's your chance to explain you standing up for the patient and while you're there to learn, you're not there to break privacy rules.
  3. by   MassNurse24
    I agree that it is an uncomfortable situation. You are stuck between a rock and a hard place with this one. It's not appropriate to all barge in there and watch a procedure, especially if the patient looked really uncomfortable. It's important to be able to read body language and keep the patients best interest at heart. Most people wouldn't want everyone staring at them while getting a catheter placed. I would keep notice of this and if it keeps happening it would probably be best to go to a higher up and let them know. Good luck!
  4. by   Potatoskins
    Quote from rhinoroc
    That really shouldn't have happened. You'll have so many more opportunities and meet patients who don't care if all the students are in there but the patient who is uncomfortable with even one extra student should be protected. Patient advocacy is huge in my book and sounds like it will be in yours. You'll see a lot of bad practice but I'd just keep an eye out for it at the moment and make note of what you don't want to be. If it happens again, walking out of the room because you know a patient is uncomfortable will be your way of advocating for the patient. When your instructor talks to you about it, that's your chance to explain you standing up for the patient and while you're there to learn, you're not there to break privacy rules.
    Patient advocacy is probably one of the main reasons I went into nursing. I have a really big thing with vulnerable populations that can't stand up for themselves being taken advantage of. Children, elderly, those with mental illnesses. I will definitely walk out in the future, and did walk out before everyone else this time, but after the insertion. A classmate mentioned it in our meeting afterwards and I mentioned in front of the instructor that the patient looked very uncomfortable and that's why I left. This was after she defined consent as him not saying no.
  5. by   Potatoskins
    Quote from MassNurse24
    I agree that it is an uncomfortable situation. You are stuck between a rock and a hard place with this one. It's not appropriate to all barge in there and watch a procedure, especially if the patient looked really uncomfortable. It's important to be able to read body language and keep the patients best interest at heart. Most people wouldn't want everyone staring at them while getting a catheter placed. I would keep notice of this and if it keeps happening it would probably be best to go to a higher up and let them know. Good luck!
    I really hope it was just an off day for her. I don't know if I'll have her as an instructor moving forward, but if it becomes a pattern I'll definitely approach it at that point.
  6. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Mavrick
    At some, if not most, University/teaching hospitals the patients give consent to being observed for educational purposes when they sign consent for admission to the hospital. However, if the patient is clearly uncomfortable, a better educational experience is obtained by students NOT being present for the procedure.
    I, as a patient, may withdraw that consent at any time, and don't have to count on the students picking up on the fact that I'm uncomfortable with their presence.

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