RNotes or LPNotes?? - page 2

Hello, I'm getting ready to enter the second semester of my LPN program. I was wondering if any of you have the RNotes or LPNotes books? If so, which one would you suggest? I also have a PDA so, PDA... Read More

  1. by   carolinapooh
    Quote from nd_mom
    I had to buy RNotes while in the LPN program. It was required. Not sure why but it was very helpful.
    This may not be a helpful thing, but I know the RN one is thicker. I would imagine it's got more information in it that's equally relevant to both nurses (I know the RN one has conversions, assessment tips, common drugs, etc.). I don't know anything about what's in the LPN one other than the fact that it's thinner.
  2. by   trsa34
    Thanks everyone for all the advice. After looking on Skyscape, Amazon and Googling it, I called the Off Campus Bookstore and they had LPNotes for cheaper so I went up there and they also had and spiral bound called LPN Facts made Incredibly Quick. I looked through them both and compared the contents and decided to go with the incredibly easy one. I'll go back for the RNotes once I'm in RN school.
    Thanks again, It's good to know that when I need great advice with nursing, I can always come here.
    Tina
  3. by   CityKat
    Quote from Thedreamer
    Taken right off the Nursing boards website for scope of practice.

    LPN
    (a) Collecting data and conducting focused nursing assessments of the health status of clients.

    RN
    (a) Providing comprehensive nursing assessment of the health status of clients, families, groups, and communities.

    LPN is focused on patient. RN Does the patient, family, ect. When it comes to the patient care which is what I am referring to, there isnt a considerable difference in the actual patient assessment. LPN does a full head to toe just like the RN does, and in my state in most places where the LPN works, they do the assessment and the RN they report to signs off on it.
    What boards are you looking at? In NY state, the LPN isn't allowed to perform a physical assessment, it's what differentiates the two. "Collecting data and performing focused"....the key word here, is "focused". In the RN's scope, it is "comprehensive". That's the difference and it' pretty significant. Comprehensive is what it is, comprehensive...full head to toe. Focused is exactly what it is, "focused". That does not entail FULL head to toe physical assessment. Again, this is what differentiates an RN from an LPN in all states and what strengthens the fact that the RN is an independent practitioner and an LPN is not. She delegates tasks to the LPN, the LPN does not delegate tasks to her. The RN doesn't answer to anyone as an independent practitioner. I have NEVER heard of an RN in NY, Hi or Ca delegating their responsibility of assessing. If an RN just "signs off" on her patients assessment that she herself is responsible for, than her license is in jeopardy if the assessment was done incorrectly and the LPN didn't "see" something and something happens to the patient. LPN's are not trained to do full head to toe assessments. It is something they gain overtime. In NY state, it's the responsibility of the RN to perform the assessment and it says so in the scopes of practice. Sure, the scopes of practice may differentiate a tad from state to state, but they don't perform head to toe assessments and document their findings, it is the RN that does this. If I'm wrong, than my university is teaching us incorrectly.
  4. by   IrishIzCPNP
    RN v LPN...

    I can chime in that we were told over and over and over again that the 1 HUGE difference between the 2 is that only an RN can assess a patient. That is one task that can never be delegated. That's a pretty big thing when you consider the education behind an assessment.

    If there wasn't a pretty big difference the LPNs in my program wouldn't have only gotten out of 2 classes...and with that many feel a little lost because we learned things in those classes that they actually never learned.

    As far as RN or LPN Notes...no idea. Gonna look at it myself now. Only opinion wise...If you are going to stay an LPN I would get the LPN notes. If you are moving onto your RN now I would get the RN one unless you want the LPN one for working.
  5. by   marilynmom
    LPN can NOT assess patients in my state either.
  6. by   Thedreamer
    Well being that my LPN program here in floridas entire 2nd terms clinical was entirely head to toe assessments, and care plans, id beg to differ that we aren't trained in that area.

    As I said before, we know alot more then we are allowed to do. Mind you, I am reffering primarily to where most LPNs work, I.e. the nursing home. In a hospital setting such as the hospital down the street from my house, LPNs primarily just pass meds, and can be trained in certain specialty areas like wound care.

    There is a big difference in what LPNs are trained to do, and what we are allowed to do with scope of practice. That was my original point.
    Last edit by Thedreamer on May 12, '07
  7. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from Thedreamer
    Well being that my LPN program here in floridas entire 2nd terms clinical was entirely head to toe assessments, and care plans, id beg to differ that we aren't trained in that area.



    Nobody said they weren't trained in the area but in many states (maybe all) they are not allowed to do the formal assessment. The RN must do an assessment. The LPNs in my class know how to assess...but not to the degree learned in the LPN program. So it's possible that the assessment learned by an LPN is different then the assessment for RN. I don't know but it's entirely possible.
  8. by   CityKat
    Quote from Thedreamer
    Well being that my LPN program here in floridas entire 2nd terms clinical was entirely head to toe assessments, and care plans, id beg to differ that we aren't trained in that area.

    As I said before, we know alot more then we are allowed to do. Mind you, I am reffering primarily to where most LPNs work, I.e. the nursing home. In a hospital setting such as the hospital down the street from my house, LPNs primarily just pass meds, and can be trained in certain specialty areas like wound care.

    There is a big difference in what LPNs are trained to do, and what we are allowed to do with scope of practice. That was my original point.
    First off, this isn't a jab at the LPN in any way, ok. But, DESPITE the fact that you as an LPN are "allowed" to do more, why would you? If you do something out of your scope of practice, legally, you can lose your license. I understand about nursing homes and such, as they are run by mostly LPN's and UAP. But, if you're working in a hospital where there is an RN, the RN MUST DO the assessment. In most states, b/c it is what differentiates the RN and LPN. In reference to the Florida scope of practice, I would re-read that one more time. As I stated before it's "focused" and NOT a "comprehensive" assessment. Therefore, I would be weary if I were you, in performing a "comprehensive" assessment because of the liability. You don't want to lose everything you have worked so hard for It doesn't matter if you're allowed to, it's what your scope of practice says. You know? That is your Bible and it is what you should know inside and out. As far as being trained in assessment, you are, but not the way the RN is. I only know this because I have a few personal friends who are LPN's and I've talked to a few here in NYC. It varies from state to state, I'm sure. LPN's do give some medication, so they would have to know the basic ABC's to assessment.
  9. by   Thedreamer
    I simply said we are able to do it, but arent allowed to. No need to get feathers rumpled.
  10. by   kukukajoo
    LPN's in NH CAN assess. Yep it surprised me when I was reading the BON website and so was my instructor.
  11. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from kukukajoo
    LPN's in NH CAN assess. Yep it surprised me when I was reading the BON website and so was my instructor.


    Focused though...not comprehensive which is different. They are two different types of assessments. In truth an LPN would have to be able to do a focused one because if you can't do focused that really excludes you from being able to do so many other things. So it makes perfect sense that a focused is allowed. A comprehensive is very different. Most RN programs have a course just on assessment...an I hear it can be a nightmare sometimes (will be finding out soon...so far it's not fun so I hope it doesn't get worse).

    Nobody is knocking LPNs and their education but there is a difference between LPN and RN both in education and scope of practice.
  12. by   kukukajoo
    Participating in the development and modification of the comprehensive plan of care for all types of clients.

    Also from the LPN Scope of practice in NH.
  13. by   IrishIzCPNP
    Quote from kukukajoo
    Participating in the development and modification of the comprehensive plan of care for all types of clients.

    Also from the LPN Scope of practice in NH.


    Oh my...that does not enable you to do a comprehensive assessment. It says it in plain English that you can do focussed. Helping to with a plan of care is not an assessment. The above information is about the care of a patient and has nothing to do with an assessment.

    You cannot do a comprehensive assessment which was the focus of the above topic. The law says you can't do it. It doesn't matter what else you can do that like the stuff you post above...that doesn't mean you can do comprehensive assessment when it's written in black and white that you do focused.

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